State and Local Policy Database

Building Benchmarking, Rating, & Transparency

Energy use information is critical for quantifying and evaluating building energy use patterns in order to develop the most effective ways to reduce energy use in a city’s building stock. Benchmarking and energy use disclosure can also reduce the informational gaps that limit investment in energy efficiency improvements. Additionally, the process of benchmarking itself has been correlated with energy savings. Required public disclosure of energy use information increases the visibility of high-energy-consuming buildings, helping buyers and renters to incorporate energy use into their process of choosing a home or investment. This sub-category includes information on two topics:

  • Commercial Benchmarking and Disclosure Policies – Adoption of a policy requiring energy benchmarking and disclosure; implementation status of policy; training and guidance available regarding compliance with policy; enforcement mechanisms in policy; stipulation in policy regarding availability of disclosed individual building energy use information (i.e. general public, parties to a transaction, or government only); release of a report, database, or other analysis of energy use data.
  • Residential/Multifamily Rating, Benchmarking and Disclosure Policies and Practices – Adoption of a policy requiring energy benchmarking/rating and disclosure; implementation status of policy; training and guidance available regarding compliance with policy; enforcement mechanisms in policy; stipulation in policy regarding availability of disclosed individual building energy use information (i.e. general public, parties to a transaction, or government only); inclusion of a field for energy efficiency features (e.g. documentation of HERS, LEED or other green ratings) in the real estate multiple listing service (MLS) serving the city.
  • Voluntary Benchmarking – Presence of a policy or program that encourages buildings to benchmark energy use through ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager. The program must have been active in 2013-2014, target some or all of the city’s private building stock, and have methods in place to measure participation.

Arlington may not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector, under state law. Energy efficiency measures are not included in the MLS serving the Arlington area.

Last Updated: October 2015

Residential and Commercial 

The City of Atlanta require benchmarking and transparency for commercial buildings greater than 25,000 square feet. Implementation began in 2015, and the first annual transparency report will be issued the first quarter of 2017.

Training and Guidance provided by the City or State

The City of Atlanta has provided several benchmarking training sessions and will continue to provide them in 2017. Following the training, a Technical Support Team provides one-on-one technical assistance. Additionally, the Southface Help Desk provides technical assistance during regular business hours. General questions and additional resources can be accessed on the program website

Enforcement Strategy

There is a $2,000/year civil fine for noncompliance. There is no penalty for poor energy performance.​

Energy Use Disclosure 

All commercial properties greater than 25,000 square feet must disclose energy use to the City, which then issues an annual public transparency report on building performance.

Reports and Database

Reports can be found on the program website. The first report will be published the first quarter of 2017.

Last Updated: January 2017

Commercial

Austin's Energy Conservation and Audit Disclosure Ordinance (ECAD) requires commercial buildings to obtain ENERGY STAR ratings and disclose ratings to prospective buyers starting in 2012. This ordinance was adopted in November 2008 and was implemented in June 2009. Compliance deadlines began June 2012.  

Residential

The ECAD requires audits of single-family homes prior to a sale and audits of large multifamily buildings. This ordinance was adopted in November 2008 and was implemented in June 2009.  Austin MLS, the multiple listing service serving the Austin region, includes fields for energy efficiency features of homes listed on the market.

Training and Guidance Provided by the City or State

Residential single-family housing- Austin provides annual education and outreach events for local real estate professionals (including realtors, real estate agents, lenders & title companies), local home performance companies and over 70 local registered energy auditors/professionals. Media materials and resources include the ECAD webpage, marketing & advertising materials and dedicated customer contact group supporting phone and email inquiries.  

Residential multifamily properties- Austin provides annual education and outreach events for local multifamily property owners and property management companies, local home performance companies and also local registered energy auditors/professionals.  Media materials and resources include website, marketing & advertising materials and dedicated customer contact group supporting phone and email inquiries. 

Commercial buildings- Austin provides annual education and outreach events for building owners, property management companies and third party energy professionals to support energy benchmarking and reporting every year.  Media materials and resources include website, marketing & advertising materials and dedicated customer contact group supporting phone and email inquiries.                          

Enforcement Strategy 

Non-compliance with ECAD is a Class C misdemeanor with fines from $500 to $2,000. Anyone may file violations with the City of Austin Municipal Courts for review and action.

Energy Use Disclosure 

Residential single-family housing is defined as properties with 1-4 dwelling units (includes duplex, tri and four-plexes). The ECAD Ordinance requires the properties over 10 years old or at the end of the year they turn 10 years old to be audited before the time of sale. Audits must be conducted by a qualified ECAD Energy Professional, and owners have to disclose home’s energy efficiency as part of the real estate transaction.

Residential multifamily properties with five or more units are required to complete an energy audit of the residential units. These audits must be done the year the property turns 10 years old, with new audits conducted every 10 years after. The Energy Audit results must be disclosed to current and prospective tenants. 

Commercial buildings, larger than 10,000 square feet, are required to benchmark and report their energy use rating every year. At least 12 months of energy data and some basic information about buildings are needed before reporting. Annual energy benchmarking reporting should be completed by June 1st and submitted to the City of Austin by July 1st. First-time compliance requirements phased in over a three-year period from 2012 to 2014. The owner of a commercial facility must make this information available to a prospective purchaser of the facility before the time of sale.

Reports and Database

The ECAD ordinance has a comprehensive data management system tracking annual compliance for each market.  Annual reports have been provided since 2009.                                                                                                                                                            

Last Updated: January 2017

Baltimore does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector.

The multiple listing service for the Baltimore region, MRIS, has included fields for energy efficiency features.
 

Last Updated: January 2017

Birmingham does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector.

The Multiple Listing Service that serves the Birmingham region includes fields for energy efficiency features.

Last Updated: January 2017

Commercial

In April 2013, the city council adopted the Building Energy Reporting and Disclosure Ordinance. The ordinance requires that all commercial buildings over 35,000 sqft benchmark their energy and water use using Portfolio Manager and report the data to the city annually. The city will then publically disclose the building-level energy use information on a website annually. The city publically discloses the building-level energy use information on a website annually. The city also releases analyses of energy use data provided through the policy. The policy also includes mechanisms for enforcement and penalties in cases of non-compliance. Boston has provided outreach and support to help property owners comply.

Residential

The Building Energy Reporting and Disclosure Ordinance also requires that all residential buildings over 35 units benchmark their energy and water use using Portfolio Manager and report the data to the city annually. The city publicly discloses the building-level energy use information on a website annually. The policy includes mechanisms for enforcement and penalties in cases of non-compliance. 

The multiple listing service serving Boston includes a field for energy efficiency features of homes listed on the market.

Voluntary Benchmarking

Boston engaged non-governmental agencies to lead by example and voluntary report under the Building Energy Reporting and Disclosure Ordinance before reporting was required. To date, state government, the regional transit authority, the water authority, and federal buildings in Boston are participating in reporting as a result of this initiative.

Last Updated: January 2017

Through Boulder's EnergySmart DSM program, businesses and property owners can benchmark their buildings for free. The 2015 Building Performance Ordinance requires commercial properties to benchmark their energy use. In Boulder, only licensed rental properties in the residential sector have required benchmarking.

Last Updated: October 2015

The residential sector is subject to the Time of Sale Energy Efficiency Ordinance, which mandates minimum energy efficiency upgrades must be made when buildings are sold. The MLS service covering the Burlington area does not currently include fields for energy-efficient features.

Last Updated: October 2015

Carrboro does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector. The MLS which serves the Carrboro area does not include fields for energy-efficient features.

Last Updated: April 2014

Charlotte does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector. 

Triangle MLS, the multiple listing service for the Charlotte region, includes energy efficiency categories for the homes listed on the market.

Last Updated: January 2017

Charlottesville may not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector, under state law. Energy efficiency measures are included in the MLS serving the Charlottesville area.

Last Updated: October 2015

Benchmarking Policy - Commercial and Residential

The Chicago Energy Use Benchmarking Ordinance requires commercial and residential buildings greater than 50,000 square feet to benchmark using Portfolio Manager, verify the data, and make the information transparent to the city. Covered buildings must comply by providing annual reports to the City. Every three years, benchmarking data must be verified by a trained professional. This ordinance was adopted in September 2013, implemented shortly thereafter, and the reporting schedule began in June 2014. This ordinance is enforced by the commissioner of the City’s Department of Business Affairs and Consumer Protection, and non-compliance holds a daily fine. The aggregated benchmarking data is made available to the public on an annual basis, and building-specific data is released to the public after the second year that a property reports under the ordinance.

The ordinance is now fully implemented and all properties covered by the ordinance were required to report by June 1, 2016. Some properties were also required to comply in 2015 or 2014, since properties were phased-in by building size and sector.

Chicago offers training and guidance to building owners through a full time help center hotline. Chicago also worked with local utilities to ensure access to whole-building energy use data for buildings with multiple tenants, simplifying the process of data collection. Also, at the time of sale realtors can access home energy cost transparency reports which they are then required to provide to home purchasers. 

The multiple listing service serving Chicago includes fields for energy efficiency features of homes listed on the market.

Training/guidance through the city or state

Chicago offers benchmarking training and guidance to building owners through a full time help center hotline / email address. To date, the Help Center has facilitated over 10,000 email and phone interactions since 2014. Also, the City has worked with partners to offer 40 free trainings over the past 3 years.

Chicago also worked with local utilities to ensure access to whole-building energy use data for buildings with multiple tenants, simplifying the process of data collection.

Enforcement strategy for non-compliance or poor energy performance

This ordinance is enforced by the commissioner of the City’s Department of Business Affairs and Consumer Protection (BACP), and non-compliance holds a daily fine.

Energy use disclosure

All commercial and residential properties 50,000 square feet or greater are required to disclose energy use to the City of Chicago. The City of Chicago is then authorized to share the building-specific energy use information publicly after the 2nd year that a property reports to the City.

City database of energy use data

Currently, data are publicly available in a database (which can be downloaded) for the properties that were required to comply in 2014 and again in 2015. The data are available on two platforms: City of Chicago's Data Portal and Chicago Building Energy Performance Map. Realtors to access home energy cost transparency reports.

Additional analysis of building energy use data are provided in the City’s annual energy benchmarking reports, which have been published in 2014 and 2015.

Energy efficiency features in local MLS

Midwest Real Estate Data (Chicago’s MLS) provide a number of green fields, including:

  • HERS Index Score
  • ENERGY STAR Score/Certification
  • LEED Certification
  • NAHB Certification
  • Green features, including PV, solar hot water, geothermal, low flow commodes, air exchanges, etc.

Last Updated: January 2017

Cincinnati does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector. The MLS service that serves the Cincinnati area includes fields for energy-efficient measures.

Last Updated: January 2017

Cleveland has a voluntary program - Cleveland 2030 District - to encourage building benchmarking in commercial buildings.

Last Updated: March 2017

 In June 2014, the City of Columbus, launched the Columbus Energy Challenge - a voluntary benchmarking program - with a goal to reduce energy use from buildings over 50,000 square feet by 20% by 2020 and benchmark 70% of those buildings (approximately 680 buildings). Each participating business is provided with quality information about energy benchmarking, training opportunities, tutorials on how to register buildings using ENERGY STAR® Portfolio Manager®, and a spreadsheet template that makes automatically uploading utility data easy.  As of October 2016, there are 113 buildings registered in the Challenge, equaling 18,856,598 square feet of space that are benchmarking through the program. 

There is not enforcement strategy in place, but a rewards and recognition strategy is in place for those entities that do participate and reduce energy usage 20%. They are called the GreenSpotLight Awards.

Last Updated: March 2017

Dallas does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage commercial or residential building benchmarking. 

Last Updated: January 2017

Commercial and Residential 

In December 2016, Denver city council passed the Energize Denver program which requires commercial and multi-family buildings over 50,000 square feet to track and report their ENERGY STAR score, beginning in 2017. In 2018, buildings over 25,000 square feet will be required to report their score. 

Denver also has a voluntary program to encourage building benchmarking for commercial and multi-family buildings. Watts To Water is a program dedicated to energy and water use reduction from the commercial sector in the Denver metro area. Participating buildings must share data in ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager.

In addition to the city's programs, the multiple listing service, CREN, has many fields to indicate energy efficiency features of the homes listed on the market.

Training and Guidance Provided by the City or State 

Many ‘How to Benchmark’ training sessions have been held as part of the voluntary benchmarking program.  See past newsletters for details on all the trainings. 

Upon passage of Energize Denver, the City will implement the benchmarking and transparency requirement with the assistance of a third-party Help Center designed to provide building owners with live support and trainings for those who seek it. The help center will answer the phone, emails, provide answers to FAQs, online and in person training sessions on how to benchmark, helping owners submit their report in Portfolio Manager and more. 

Enforcement Strategy 

There will be a financial penalty of $2,000 to be enforced if an owner has failed to submit their report after multiple issued warnings and offers of assistance with benchmarking.

Energy Use Disclosure

Once all eligible buildings have submitted their reports in Portfolio Manager, the City will post each building’s ENERGY STAR score on a publicly available website.

Reports and Database

The City will implement a tool to track all required data fields for all buildings as well as an annual analysis of building energy usage data once the benchmarking requirement is in effect and the city has data from its first reporting period.

Last Updated: March 2017

Detroit does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector.

Last Updated: January 2017

Dubuque does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector. The MLS service, which serves the Dubuque area, does not include fields for energy-efficient measures.

Last Updated: October 2013

El Paso does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector. The region’s multiple listing service includes fields for energy efficiency features of homes listed on the market.

Last Updated: January 2017

Fort Worth's Business Smart is a voluntary program to encourage energy performance in the commercial sector. The program recognizes building owners for their participation and achievements in improving the energy efficiency of their buildings.

Last Updated: March 2017

Hartford does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector.

The Multiple Listing Service that serves the Hartford region includes fields for energy efficiency features.

Last Updated: January 2017

Commercial

Houston has started a voluntary commercial benchmarking program, the Green Office Challenge, to encourage commercial buildings to benchmark and share their energy usage data.

Residential

Houston does not have a benchmarking program for residential buildings. The the multiple listing service which serves the Houston region, Houston Green MLS, includes many fields for energy efficiency features of homes listed on the market.

Last Updated: January 2017

Indianapolis does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector.

The multiple listing service that serves the Indianapolis region includes fields for energy efficiency features of homes listed on the market.

Last Updated: January 2017

Jacksonville does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector.

The region’s multiple listing service includes fields for energy efficiency features of homes listed on the market.

Last Updated: January 2017

Commercial and Residential Benchmarking

Kansas City has passed an energy benchmarking/rating and transparency policy for commercial, public, and multifamily residential buildings and has adopted a standard for residential buildings. The commercial and multifamily residential buildings are addressed in the Energy Empowerment Program while the residential buildings use the ENERGY STAR® rating system. 

The MLS service that serves the Kansas City area includes fields for energy-efficient measures.

Training and Guidance Provided by the City or State

Kansas City offers training sessions monthly. Additional guidance resources can be found online

Enforcement Strategy

A written warning will be issued to any owner who fails to submit any required benchmarking information. In the event required benchmarking information is not reported within 60 days of the date the written warning is issued, the owner may receive a fine as low as  $50.00 and not more than $500.00. For any continuing violation of this article, each day of the violation shall be considered a separate offense, up to $2,000.00 annually.

Energy Data Disclosure

All submitted benchmarking data, including any ENERGY STAR score, shall be made available to the public.

Database and Reports

All submitted benchmarking data is available for the public to view on the program website.

Last Updated: January 2017

Knoxville encourages but does not require buildings in any sector to benchmark or disclose their energy usage data. The MLS which serves the Knoxville area does not include fields for energy efficiency features.

Last Updated: October 2015

Las Vegas does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector.

The multiple listing service (MLS) that serves the Las Vegas metro area includes fields for energy efficiency features.

Last Updated: January 2017

There are no benchmarking or disclosure requirements in place for commercial buildings. For residential buildings, the state of Kansas requires homebuilders to disclose energy efficiency measures to potential buyers. The MLS service which serves the Lawrence area does not include fields for energy-efficient measures.

Last Updated: October 2015

Commercial and Residential Benchmarking

The State of California adopted Assembly Bill (AB) 802 in October of 2015. It will require commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet and larger to benchmark energy usage annually. This will most likely begin in 2018.

Los Angeles has adopted an ordinance that will go beyond AB 802 and require all buildings over 20,000 square feet (both commercial and residential) to annually benchmark energy and water usage beginning in 2017. 

Training and Guidance provided by the City or State

The City is in the process of setting up a Benchmarking Help Center in collaboration with the LA Better Buildings Challenge. This will be a call-in hotline as well as one-on-one guidance that building owners can use when they need technical assistance to help complete the benchmarking process.

Additionally, the city is working with the local chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council to launch an outreach and education program. This will help building owners understand all the requirements of the ordinance as well as provide benchmarking training. 

Enforcement

The LA Department of Building and Safety will be responsible for enforcing the benchmarking ordinance. The City made a big effort to incorporate these requirements with the Department as part of new code enforcement operations. This will help ensure the longevity of the program and integrate it with other building related requirements. 

Energy Use Disclosure 

The benchmarking ordinance requires annual disclosure to the general public for commercial, residential and municipal buildings. 

Reports and Database

The city plans on publishing a database with both the compliance information as well as the energy and water consumption information. The city will also complete analysis of this data to better understand energy and water usage trends across its building stock. 

Last Updated: February 2017

Louisville does not have mandatory programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector. The Office of Sustainability and The Louisville Energy Alliance encourage building owners to voluntarily benchmark their buildings through the Louisville Kilowatt Crackdown.  

Last Updated: January 2017

Madison does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector. The MLS which serves the Madison area does not include fields for energy efficiency features.

Last Updated: October 2013

Memphis does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector.

The multiple listing service which serves the Memphis region includes energy efficiency fields for features of homes listed on the market, using the Memphis Green Features Checklist.

Last Updated: January 2017

Miami does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector.

The multiple listing service that serves the Miami region includes energy efficiency fields for features of homes listed on the market.

Last Updated: January 2017

Milwaukee does not currently have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector. 

Last Updated: January 2017

Commercial

The Commercial Building Rating and Disclosure Ordinance, passed January 2013 and requires benchmarking of commercial buildings greater than 50,000 square feet. Benchmarking results are available to the public annually. If a building owner does not comply with the ordinance, the action may result in loss of business license.

Residential

The city does not require benchmarking for residential buildings at this time. The Multiple Listing Service (MLS) that serves the Minneapolis region includes fields for energy efficiency features.

Last Updated: January 2017

Nashville does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector.

The multiple listing service that serves the Nashville region includes fields for energy efficiency features.

Last Updated: January 2017

New Orleans has a benchmarking program in place for its municipal buildings. The city does not yet have a benchmarking program for private sector buildings.

The MLS service that serves the New Orleans area includes fields for energy-efficient measures.

Last Updated: February 2017

Commercial

Local Law 84 requires annual ENERGY STAR benchmarking and public disclosure for large commercial buildings, specifically single buildings larger than 50,000 square feet, and groups of smaller buildings on a single lot that together are larger than 100,000 square feet.  This policy was enacted December 2009 and was implemented in May 2010. The data became public in September 2012. There is an online help room and reference guide to aid in compliance. Failure to comply with the law results in a $500 fine per quarter of noncompliance with a maximum of $2,000 per year for one instance. NYC annually discloses a dataset to the public. Reports have been released from 2012 through 2014.

In October 2016, the New York City Council voted to amend the law to include mid-size buildings that are larger than 25,000 square feet. Building owners of these properties will begin to report energy and water use to the City in 2018.

Residential

Local Law 84 requires annual ENERGY STAR benchmarking and public disclosure for large multifamily buildings. This policy was enacted December 2009 and was implemented in May 2010. The data became public in September 2013. There is an online help room and reference guide to aid in compliance. Failure to comply with the law results in a $500 fine per quarter of noncompliance with a maximum of $2000 per year for one instance. NYC annually discloses a dataset to the public. Reports have been released from 2011 through 2014.

Last Updated: January 2017

Oakland does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector. 

Updated: February 20156

Oklahoma City does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector.

The Multiple Listing Service that serves the Oklahoma City region includes fields for energy efficiency features.

Last Updated: January 2017

In December 2016, Orlando passed an energy benchmarking and transparency policy, Building Energy and Water Efficiency Strategy. The policy requires existing commercial and multifamily buildings larger than 50,000 square feet to track whole-building energy use. Building owners must report energy use data to the City annually and make their information transparent to the real estate marketplace. The policy covers less than five percent of Orlando’s buildings, but accounts for more than 50 percent of total energy and water used by all buildings citywide. Private sector buildings are required to report beginning May 1, 2018.

Through another program, the Kilowatt Crackdown, buildings not subject to the City's benchmarking ordinance can voluntarily benchmark energy and water use using ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager. Orlando's Kilowatt Crackdown 2.0 launches in 2017.

The Multiple Listing Service (MLS) that serves the Orlando region includes fields for energy efficiency features.

Last Updated: January 2017

Benchmarking is not required for any sector of buildings in Park City. The Park City MLS includes fields for energy-efficient features.

Last Updated: October 2015

Commercial and Residential Benchmarking

Bill No. 120428 requires commercial and multi-family residential buildings over 50,000 square feet to benchmark and disclose energy usage data. The program is in its fourth year of implementation for commercial buildings and first year of implementation for residential properties.

Training and Guidance provided by the City or State

The City of Philadelphia offers in-person training and phone assistance through the Office of Sustainability and in partnership with the Delaware Valley Green Building Council. The city also provides guidance documents online.

Enforcement 

The City issues Notices of Violation for properties that do not report or fail to disclose realistic energy performance. The city has the ability to fine properties $300 for non-compliance and, after 30 days, an additional $100/day until the Notice of Violation is resolved.

Energy Use Disclosure 

Data is disclosed on the program webpage, as well as through the city’s data visualization tool

Reports and Database

The city data and reports can be found online

Last Updated: January 2017

Commercial and Residential Benchmarking

The city currently supports a voluntary program lead by the Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) called the Kilowatt-hour Krackdown” that has seen hundreds of buildings voluntarily contribute benchmark data. Additionally, the City is currently in discussions with BOMA to enhance the program to provide incentives to building owners who have not yet benched their building. There is a training program in place supported by the utilities and delivered by BOMA that covers the full cost of participation and technical support for building owners. ​

AR MLS, the multiple listing service that serves the Phoenix region includes fields for energy efficiency features and green certifications of homes listed on the market.

Last Updated: January 2017 

In October 2016, Pittsburgh passed a mandatory bechmarking and disclosure ordinance for commercial buildings over 50,000 SF. Annual building benchmarking information will be published online.

The City of Pittsburgh will be the first to disclose its buildings’ performance, reporting municipal building energy use by June 1, 2017, for the 2016 calendar year. Implementation for private sector buildings will report by June 1, 2018 for the 2017 calendar year. Non-compliance is not subject to penalty or enforcement.

 

Last Updated: March 2017

Commercial

In April 2015, Portland City Council adopted the Commercial Building Energy Performance Reporting Ordinance.  This benchmarking and transparency policy requires commercial buildings greater than 20,000 square feet to track energy performance metrics and report this information annually to the City. Implementation began in 2015 with 340 of Portland's largest commercial buildings reporting their benchmarking results to the City.

Residential

In December 2016, Portland City Council unanimously adopted the Home Energy Score Policy, Title 17.108. The policy requires the disclosure of home energy performance scores when homes are listed publicly on the market for sale. The disclosure requirement is placed on home sellers, who must disclose the home energy score and associated information to the City and to prospective buyers who visit the home while it is on the market. The proposed scoring tool is the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Score, which provides an asset rating that allows buyers to compare prospective homes on an apples-to-apples basis. The policy goes into effect January 1, 2018.

Training and Guidance provided by the City or State

To help commercial building owners and managers benchmark and comply with reporting requirements, the City worked with the Energy Trust of Oregon and energy utilities to provide six free, hands-on training sessions, a step-by-step compliance guide and a benchmarking telephone hotline to provide customized assistance.  

Enforcement Strategy 

Any commercial building owner or tenant that fails to comply with the ordinance, can be subject to a civil penalty up to $500 for every 90-day period which the non-compliance continues.  

Energy Use Disclosure 

Disclosure of commercial building energy use to the City of Portland is required annually. Starting with data for calendar year 2016, the City will map individual building energy performance metrics to inform commercial market decisions. This online map will be available to the general public. 

Reports and Database

An analysis of the first year commercial building benchmarking compliance data was completed during the summer of 2015. A summary report of this analysis for calendar year 2015 is published on the policy website.

Last Updated: February 2017

Providence does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector. Providence was selected to participate in the City Energy Project (CEP), a joint project by the Natural Resource Defense Council and the Institute for Market Transformation. 

Last Updated: February 2017

Raleigh does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector.

The Multiple Listing Service that serves the Raleigh region includes fields for energy efficiency features.

Last Updated: January 2017

Under state law, Richmond may not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector. Energy efficiency fields are included in the multiple listing service that services the Richmond area.

Last Updated: January 2017

Commercial

The State of California adopted Assembly Bill (AB) 802 in October of 2015. It will require commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet and larger to benchmark energy usage annually. This will most likely begin in 2018. 

California requires commercial buildings to obtain and disclose ENERGY STAR ratings to transactional counter parties and the California Energy Commission at the time of a sale, lease or financing for the entire building through AB 1130.

Residential

SoCal MLS, the multiple listing service that serves the Riverside region, includes energy efficiency fields for features of homes listed on the market.

Last Updated: January 2017

Commercial

The State of California adopted Assembly Bill (AB) 802 in October of 2015. It will require commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet and larger to benchmark energy usage annually. This will most likely begin in 2018. 

California requires commercial buildings to obtain and disclose ENERGY STAR ratings to transactional counter parties and the California Energy Commission at the time of a sale, lease, or financing for the entire building through AB 1130.

Residential

Sacramento does not have a program for residential building benchmarking. SoCal MLS, the multiple listing service that serves the Sacramento region, includes energy efficiency fields for features of homes listed on the market.

Last Updated: January 2017

 

Salt Lake City has a voluntary program that encourages building owners to benchmark their energy use called the Mayor’s Skyline Challenge. This initiative encourages building owners in the city to meet and exceed air quality and energy-saving targets of the Sustainable Salt Lake Plan. 

Last Updated: January 2017 

San Antonio does not have a benchmarking program for commercial or residential buildings. 

San Antonio MLS, the multiple listing service that serves the San Antonio region, includes fields for energy efficiency features of homes listed on the market.

Last Updated: January 2017

Commercial

The State of California adopted Assembly Bill (AB) 802 in October of 2015. It will require commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet and larger to benchmark energy usage annually. This will most likely begin in 2018.

California requires commercial buildings to obtain and disclose ENERGY STAR ratings to transactional counter parties and the California Energy Commission at the time of a sale, lease, or financing for the entire building through AB 1130.

Residential

SoCal MLS, the multiple listing service that serves the San Diego region, includes energy efficiency fields for homes listed on the market.

Last Updated: January 2017

 

Commercial 

Chapter 20 of the San Francisco Environment Code requires audits and public transparency of benchmarks for all commercial buildings over 10,000 square feet. This chapter was approved by the city council in February 2011 and its implementation was phased in over three years. This requirement is enforced by the Director of the Department of the Environment and non-compliance may result in a fine. Training is available online through the Portfolio Manager help page.

Residential

SF ARMLS, the multiple listing service that serves the San Francisco region, includes energy efficiency fields for homes listed on the market.

Last Updated: January 2017

Commercial

The State of California adopted Assembly Bill (AB) 802 in October of 2015. It will require commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet and larger to benchmark energy usage annually. This will most likely begin in 2018. 

Additionally, California requires commercial buildings to obtain and make transparent ENERGY STAR ratings to transactional counter parties and the California Energy Commission at the time of a sale, lease, or financing for the entire building through AB 1130.

Residential

San Jose does not have a benchmarking program in place for residential buildings. SoCal MLS, the multiple listing service that serves the San Jose region, includes energy efficiency fields for homes listed on the market.

Last Updated: January 2017

Commercial

CB 116731 requires commercial buildings over 20,000 square feet to benchmark and disclose energy usage data upon request to prospective buyers, tenants, lenders, or existing tenants. Any building under 20,000 square feet may voluntarily benchmark and disclose. The policy was adopted in January 2010, and was implemented throughout 2011. Compliance requirements went into effect in April 2012. There is an online help room and a helpline for training and guidance. The policy is enforced by the director through a fine, or at the director’s discretion. The building owner must disclose upon request to prospective buyers, tenants, lenders or existing tenants.

Residential

CB 116731 requires multifamily buildings over 20,000 square feet to benchmark and disclose energy usage data upon request to prospective buyers, tenants, lenders, or existing tenants. Any building under 20,000 square feet may voluntarily benchmark and disclose. The policy was adopted in January 2010, and was implemented throughout 2011. Compliance requirements went into effect in April 2012. There is an online help room and a helpline for training and guidance. The policy is enforced by the director through a fine, or at the director’s discretion.

The NorthWest MLS, the multiple listing service serving Seattle includes fields for ENERGY STAR, LEED, and Built Green homes.

Last Updated: January 2017

In January 2017, St Louis adopted the Building Energy Awareness bill. It requires certain buildings to record annual whole-building energy and water consumption data in ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager. City-owned buildings will benchmark in the first year under the ordinance in 2017. Privately-owned commercial buildings 50,000 sq.ft. and larger will need to comply by April 1, 2018. Both city- and privately-owned buildings will be required to report their consumption information each year thereafter. The city will publish benchmarking data on a public website and produce a report  of citywide analysis.

The St. Louis High Performance Building Initiative encourages buildings - otherwise not mandated - to benchmark their energy use. The goal of the program is a 25% reduction in building energy consumption by the year 2020.

The multiple listing service for the St. Louis region, includes energy efficiency categories for the homes listed on the market. 

Last Updated: March 2017 

Tampa does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector.

The multiple listing service that serves the Tampa area includes fields for energy-efficient measures.

Last Updated: January 2017

Virginia Beach does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector.

The Multiple Listing Service that serves the Virginia Beach region includes fields for energy efficiency features.

Last Updated: January 2017

Commercial

The Clean and Affordable Energy Act requires commercial buildings over 50,000 square feet to benchmark and publicly disclose energy usage data using ENERGY STAR software. This policy was adopted July 2008, and implementation began in 2010. Disclosure must be done annually, and data will be published on a website managed by the District. Non-compliance results in a fine. A website has been set up as well as a help center for training for compliance.

Residential

The Clean and Affordable Energy Act requires large multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet to benchmark and publicly disclose energy usage data using ENERGY STAR software. This policy was adopted July 2008, and implementation began in 2010. Disclosure must be done annually, and data will be published on a website managed by the District. Non-compliance results in a fine. A website has been set up as well as a help center for training for compliance.

The local Multiple Listing Service (MLS) incorporates fields for energy efficiency features into real estate listings.

Last Updated: January 2017