State and Local Policy Database

Fleets

Collectively, state governments own approximately 500,000 vehicles. Operation and maintenance costs for these fleets every year run to more than $2.5 billion nation-wide. In response to this significant cost, states may adopt definitive energy efficiency standards for state vehicle fleets. These standards ensure a reduction in fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. States may also set binding goals to reduce petroleum use or requirements for the procurement of hybrid-electric or all-electric vehicles.

Alabama Act 2009-650 adopts a procedure for implementing and administering a green fleets program of procuring state motor vehicles based on criteria that include fuel economy and life cycle costing; requires fleet managers of state motor vehicles to classify their vehicle inventory for compliance with this act; establishes goals for fuel efficiency for state motor vehicles; establishes procurement policies; creates the Green Fleets Review Committee to ensure compliance; provides for advisory subcommittees; and provides that fleet managers submit annual plans for procuring fuel-efficient vehicles.

ACT-650 prescribes that the average fleet fuel economy be increased each fiscal year by four percent for light-duty vehicles, three percent for medium-duty vehicles, and two percent for heavy-duty vehicles, and implements an anti-idling policy for state owned or operated vehicles."

Executive Order Number 38 was signed by Governor Bentley on March 21, 2013, which ensured the compliance of the Green Fleet Law (Act 2009-650) which mandated improvements in fuel economy and emissions through life cycle cost procurement of new vehicles and utilization of proven new technologies in existing vehicles. This program focuses on issues such as fuel efficiency and cost-effective maintenance. The goal is to have the lowest possible cost per mile driven which is to include acquisition, operation and replacement.

Last Updated: July 2017

No policy in place or proposed.

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Updated: July 2017

No policy in place or proposed.

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Updated: July 2017

No policy in place or proposed

 Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Updated: July 2017

In Management Memo 08-04, issued March 14, 2008, the Department of General Services and the California Energy Commission (CEC) established a minimum average fuel economy standard for passenger vehicles and light duty trucks in the state fleet. The combined annual purchases by each state entity must meet a standard of 27.5 miles per gallon (MPG) for passenger vehicles and 22.2 MPG for light duty trucks.  In 2015, DGS worked with CEC to update the standards for the passenger vehicles from 27.5 MPG to 38 MPG, issued through Management Memo 15-03. 

Executive Order B-2-11, issued January 28, 2011, requires an extensive analysis be conducted to eliminate all non-essential and cost-inefficient state fleet vehicles and equipment. The resulting right-sizing contributed to reduced petroleum use by the state fleet, particularly since the reduction was conducted to eliminate the most fuel inefficient vehicles.      

Executive Order B-16-12, issued March 23, 2012, requires California's state vehicle fleet to increase the number of its zero-emission vehicles through the normal course of fleet replacement so that at least 10 percent of light-duty fleet purchases are zero-emission by 2015 and at least 25 percent are zero-emission by 2020. Through this action, the state government’s fleet will be leading the way to the Executive Order’s goal of more than 1.5 million ZEVs in California by 2025, which will annually displace at least 1.5 billion gallons of petroleum fuels.

California's 2016 Zero-Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Action Plan, issued October 2016, expands upon the zero-emission vehicle purchasing mandate included in EO B-16-12. This plan ensures that at least 50 percent of light-duty fleet purchases are zero-emission by 2025. Management Memo 16-07 provides direction to state agencies for implementation.

Recent policies enacted to improve the fuel efficiency of California’s state government fleet include:

  • Management Memo 16-07 (December 2016) – provides direction to state agencies for implementing the Governor's 2016 ZEV Action Plan.
  • Management Memo 15-03 (April 2015) – increases the minimum fuel economy standard for light-duty passenger vehicles to 38 miles per gallon (MPG) from 27.5 MPG.
  • Management Memo 13-04 (January 2013) – provides direction to state agencies for implementing Executive Order B-16-12 requirements
  • Management Memo 12-05 (May 2012) – reinforces the obligation for state departments to maximize their use of alternative fuels and reduces or displaces petroleum consumption for their fleets.
  • Management Memo 12-06 (May 2012) – requires state agencies to request reconditioned, used, or remanufactured automotive parts, and re-refined or synthetic motor oil and lubricants, whenever practical and cost-beneficial as state vehicles are repaired. The use of these products can help protect the environment and reduce petroleum consumption compared to the use of new materials.
  • Management Memo 12-03 (April 2012) – mandates solar reflective colors for most new vehicle purchases, which reduce air conditioning needs and related petroleum consumption
  • Management Memo 08-04 (March 2008) – established a minimum average fuel economy standard for most fleet vehicles. Efforts are currently underway to update the established minimum average fuel economy standard to reflect the market availability of more fuel efficient vehicles.                                                         

Assembly Bill 236 (2007) added California Public Resources Code §25722.8 (a), establishing the goal of reducing or displacing the state fleet’s petroleum use by 10 percent by January 1, 2012, and by 20 percent by January 1, 2020, as compared to a 2003 baseline. To date, the state fleet has reduced its petroleum consumption by at least 13-percent and is on its way to meeting the 2020 goal of a 20-percent overall reduction. Additional information is available in the 2012 Progress Report for Reducing or Displacing the Consumption of Petroleum Products by the State Fleet.

Last Updated: July 2017

Executive Order D 0011 07 directs agencies to reduce petroleum consumption by state fleets by 25% by 2012, compared to FY 2005-2006 levels, while increasing fleet efficiency. Executive Order D 2015-013 renews this target, requiring all state agencies and departments to reduce average petroleum-based fuel consumption per vehicle by a minimum of 4% annually and at least 20% by 2020 from a baseline of 2015 or 2% annually and at least 10% by 2020 for Department of Public Safety Highway Patrol vehicles. Executive State agencies and departments shall further achieve an absolute reduction in petroleum-based fuel consumption by 15% or 7.5% for vehicles deemed exempt over the same time period. 

The Colorado Energy Office (CEO) recently completed a state fleet opportunity assessment. The assessment provides recommendations for the state to purchase vehicles or other equipment and implement policies that would decrease lifecycle costs and reduce air emissions and petroleum consumption.  These include increased utilization of low-rolling resistance tires, idling reduction, and telematic deployment.

Based on results in the fleet opportunity assessment, the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) and CEO are piloting idling reduction technologies in the state’s light- and heavy-duty trucks.  In addition, CDOT is in the process of incorporating telematics into all of its vehicles.  Telematics improve efficiency through behavioral changes, such as decreases in idling and high-speed driving, and maintenance optimization.

Additionally, CEO has the Refuel Colorado Fleet Coaching Program. The fleet coaches provide technical consulting to public and private fleets throughout the state. Energy coaches provide detailed analysis of fleets and create a business plan for efficient and alternative fuel vehicle adoption. Numerous state agencies are utilizing this service.

Last Updated: July 2017

CT Statute CGS 4a-67d (modified by PA 04-231) requires that cars and light-duty trucks purchased by the state must have an average EPA estimated fuel economy of at least 40 mpg. Purchases must comply with EPAct's state fleet acquisition requirements and must obtain the best achievable fuel economy per pound of carbon dioxide emitted in their vehicle class.

Last Updated: August 2017

Executive Order 18 sets goals for vehicles operated by state agencies to reduce petroleum consumption by 25%, vehicle emissions by 25%, and vehicle miles traveled by 15% by the end of fiscal year 2012 (using 2008 as the baseline year). In conjunction to these efficiency goals, the Governor requested that the size of the fleet be reduced by 20% from 2008 levels. Using data, Fleet Services was able to cut 22.6% or 579 vehicles. As of 2012, the amount of miles driven in Fleet vehicles was reduced by 21.62% and fuel use reduced by 11.22%. This saved 5,851,660 pounds of Co2 pollution into the atmosphere. One of the key components of EO 18 was to green Delaware's fleet and to enhance compliance with the Clean Air Act and Energy Policy Act.

All new light-duty vehicles state agencies, departments, and offices purchase must be hybrid electric, alternative fuel, fuel-efficient, or low emission vehicles, unless such a purchase compromises health, safety, or law enforcement needs.

Last Updated: July 2017

The District requires newly purchased or leased fleet vehicles to be of the maximum fuel efficiency, minimum size, and appropriate engine size necessary to meet operational needs (District Municipal Regulation, Title 27, Section 2116). The policy also requires a minimum of at least 22 miles per gallon (D.C. Code § 50-203) and limits the purchase of SUVs unless they are to be used for security, emergency, rescue, snow removal, or armored vehicles. 

District Municipal Regulation, Title 27, Section 2116 mandates the use of compact size, passenger vehicles for District government operations. Any exceptions must be justified based on a program needs and approved by the Director of the Department of Public Works (DPW).  The Director of DPW has imposed a policy for every new vehicle purchased or leased; the same number of vehicles must be surrendered for removal from the fleet (one-for-one replacement). The DPW also utilizes right-sizing.

The DC Fleet Share program reduces fleet size and vehicle miles traveled and improves fuel efficiency. It comprises 85 government-owned vehicles, 98% of which are CNGs, hybrids, and E-85s including 4 all electric vehicles. The program has resulted in reducing 360 passenger vehicles from the fleet, or 17% of the fleet’s passenger vehicles. The program also helps reduce frivolous driving as agency managers can track vehicle usage in real time, detect whether or not a vehicle is left running, and the miles travelled for each reservation. The fleet also includes non-vehicle alternatives including segways, mountain bikes, and scooters which has allowed the District to avoid the use of fuel for the equivalent of 50 vehicles.

Last Updated: July 2017

Executive Order 07-126 requires the Department of Management Services to only approve the purchase of new vehicles with the greatest fuel efficiency in a given class, as required for that vehicle to minimize emissions of greenhouse gases.

Also, in accordance with S. 286.29(4), F.S., when procuring new vehicles, all state agencies, state universities, community colleges, and local governments that purchase vehicles under a state purchasing plan shall first define the intended purpose for the vehicle and determine which of the following use classes for which the vehicle is being procured:

  • State business travel, designated operator;
  • State business travel, pool operators;
  • Construction, agricultural, or maintenance work;
  • Conveyance of passengers;
  • Conveyance of building or maintenance materials and supplies;
  • Off-road vehicle, motorcycle, or all-terrain vehicle;
  • Emergency response; or
  • Other

For all vehicles use classes except "other," when being processed for purchase or leasing agreements, vehicles must be selected for the greatest fuel efficiency available for a given use class when fuel economy data are available.

Last Updated: July 2017

No policy in place or proposed

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Updated: July 2017

House Bill 2175 calls for each agency to purchase the most fuel-efficient vehicles that meet the needs of their programs, provided that life-cycle cost-benefit analysis of vehicle purchases include projected fuel costs.  Eligible vehicles include those identified as a top performers for fuel economy in the U.S. EPA's "Fuel Economy Leaders" report.

Last Updated: July 2017

No policy in place or proposed.

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Updated: July 2017

To help achieve the statewide goal of reducing petroleum use by 20% by July 1, 2012, as compared to 2008 petroleum use, Illinois state agencies must work towards meeting the following goals:

  • By July 1, 2015, at least 20% of new passenger vehicles purchased must be hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and 5% must be battery electric vehicles (EVs);
  • By July 1, 2025, at least 60% of new passenger vehicles purchased must be HEVs and 15% must be EVs;

Agencies that operate medium- and heavy-duty vehicles must implement strategies to reduce fuel consumption through diesel emission control devices, HEV and EVs technologies, alternative fuel use, and fuel-efficient technologies. Agencies must also implement strategies to promote the use of biofuels in state vehicles; reduce the environmental impacts of employee travel; and encourage employees to adopt alternative travel methods, such as carpooling.

Last Updated: July 2017

No policy in place or proposed

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Updated: July 2017

No policy in place or proposed

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Updated: July 2017

The Kansas secretary of administration shall adopt rules and regulations that require that the average fuel economy standard for state-owned motor vehicles purchased during fiscal year 2011 shall not be less than 10% higher than the average fuel economy standard of state-owned motor vehicles purchased during fiscal year 2008, if such higher average fuel economy standards are life-cycle cost effective for such motor vehicles purchased during fiscal year 2011.

Last Updated: July 2017

No mandatory policy in place or proposed. The Kentucky Division of Fleet Management is a member of the Green Fleets of the Bluegrass. Green Fleets of the Bluegrass aims to improve the environmental performance of vehicle fleets across Kentucky by reducing petroleum fuel use. Green Fleets of the Bluegrass is a voluntary recognition program of the Kentucky Clean Fuels Coalition (KCFC).

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Updated: July 2017

LA Revised Statute 39:364 requires the Commissioner of Administration to purchase and/or lease alternative fueled vehicles unless fueling infrastructure is not available in the area where the vehicles will operate.

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must require specific improvements to state fleet efficiency that exceed existing Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards.  State procurement requirements for hybrid-electric or plug-in electric vehicles may be counted, but alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are not included. 

Last Updated: August 2017

Statute (MRSA Title 5 1812-E) mandates that except for cars and light-duty trucks purchased for law enforcement and other special use purposes, the State Purchasing Agent may not purchase or lease any car or light-duty truck for state use unless the car has a manufacturer's estimated highway mileage rating of at least 45 mpg and the light-duty truck has a manufacturer's estimated highway mileage rating of at least 35 mpg.

Last Updated: July 2017

Maryland does not currently have an energy efficiency requirement for the state vehicle fleet. However, the Maryland Energy Administration runs the Maryland Smart Energy Communities program, which incentivizes local governments to adopt policies related to the energy efficiency of their buildings and fleets.  By participating in this program, local governments set the goal of reducing their fleet's petroleum consumption by at least 20%. There are 67 participating local governments, including the largest cities and counties in the state.

Last Updated: July 2017

The Green Communities Act requires the state to purchase hybrid and alternative fuel vehicles in such numbers that 50% of the fleet is hybrid or AFV by 2018. In addition, the Green Communities Act also requires the development of a fuel efficiency standard for the state fleet. This standard was developed and approved by DOER and the Operational Services Division and encompasses the state's entire light duty fleet of more than 2,800 vehicles. The standard is accompanied by an innovative calculator that allows fleet managers to input desired vehicles and immediately see whether or not their acquisitions will meet the standard. DOER has hosted webinars and one-on-one trainings to help fleets understand and comply with the standard.  Efforts to comply with the standard have resulted in fleet efficiency gains of 26% while saving the Commonwealth approximately $5,000 dollars in upfront vehicle costs.  In addition, compared to the vehicles replaced, the new vehicle acquisitions are projected to save agencies $17,000 dollars in fuel costs and 6,800 gallons of gasoline annually

The Operational Services Division, in collaboration with DOER and other stakeholders, recently rebid the statewide vehicle contract to provide public entities with greater access to fuel efficient vehicles.  The new statewide vehicle contract has made an array of fuel efficient, hybrid and alternative fuel vehicles available for purchase by any state agency, campus, or municipality. Included on this contract are 23 models that get 30 mpg or better, 10 hybrid electric models, 6 plug-in hybrid electric models, 3 electric only vehicles, and 6 vehicles that runs on Compressed Natural Gas (CNG). 

In addition, DOER and the Operational Services Division released an Advanced Vehicle Technologies statewide contract that provides access to after-market hybrid and alternative fuel conversion technologies, electric vehicle charging stations and idle reduction technologies. This contract includes 10 vendors that offer public entities an expanded range of options for reducing vehicle petroleum consumption, particularly for vehicle types with limited fuel-efficient options available commercially, such as pick-up trucks and heavy duty vans. Through a State Fleet Efficiency grant program, DOER supports Executive Branch state agency efforts to reach compliance with the Fuel Efficiency Standard by partially or fully funding the acquisition of technologies procured from the Advanced Vehicle Technologies statewide contract.

Last Updated: July 2017

No policy in place or proposed

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Updated: July 2017

Minnesota Statutes requires the state to reduce the use of gasoline by on-road vehicles owned by state departments by 25 percent by 2010 and by 50 percent by 2015, and the use of petroleum-based diesel fuel in diesel-fueled vehicles by ten percent by 2010 and 25 percent by 2015, using 2005 as a baseline. Per Executive Order 11-13, Minnesota’s state agency fleet now references the EPA’s Green Vehicle Guide for fuel economy and energy efficiency and requires an agency procuring a vehicle to choose one with a score of 7 or greater for leased vehicles.

Last Updated: July 2017

Mississippi Code Sec. 25-1-77 requires that at least 75% of all vehicles in the State fleet must meet EPA fuel economy standards of 40 miles per gallon (MPG) by July 1, 2014. Additionally, Sec. 25-1-77 states that the Office of Fleet Management must encourage the use of fuel efficient or hybrid vehicles, as well as alternative fuel vehicles, including ethanol, biodiesel, natural gas, and electric power. 

Last Updated: July 2017

Fuel Conservation for State Vehicles, Sections 414.400 - 414.417 RSMo, (in place since 1999) and the Federal Energy Policy Act establish opportunities for Missouri state agencies to manage transportation fuel consumption and promote the use of clean domestic alternative fuels.  The Missouri statute seeks to increase the average fuel efficiency of the state fleet and increase the use of cleaner alternative transportation fuels in state vehicles. Each state agency, with assistance from the Department of Natural Resources (Division of Energy), shall develop and implement a vehicle fleet energy conservation plan for the purposes of reducing vehicle fuel consumption (414.403, RSMo). The Division of Energy and the Office of Administration are required to develop and implement a program to manage and progressively reduce state agency vehicle fleet consumption.  Guidelines must be developed, updated and revised every two years that require the overall vehicle fleet fuel efficiency for each agency to meet or exceed the fuel efficiency that would be achieved if each vehicle in the agency's fleet met the CAFE standard (414.400, RSMo). 

Last Updated: July 2017

Per Governor Initiative, the State of Montana has been directed to meet and is currently in compliance with federal CAFÉ standards. Through the Statewide Fleet System, Montana tracks CAFÉ ratings down to vehicle specific performance in an electronic Equipment Vehicle Management System (EVMS). Further per 2-17-416 MCA all new vehicles purchased meet current CAFÉ standards, unless there is a usage requirement exception.

Last Updated: July 2017

The state does not use the term “efficiency” in mandating fleet purchases. The state does require (LB 974) that more than 50 percent of the passenger fleet be intermediate, compact or subcompact: “After August 24, 1975, all state-owned vehicles that are passenger cars purchased, leased, rented, or approved for purchase, lease, or rent by the bureau shall be of the intermediate, compact, or subcompact class. Not less than fifty percent of such state-owned vehicles shall be of the compact or subcompact class unless the costs to operate and maintain such vehicles are not to the advantage of the state or such requirement fails to meet the intent of sections 81-1008 to 81-1025.”

Last Updated: July 2017

While Nevada Revised Statute 486A.010 requires clean vehicle purchasing and alternative vehicle use in certain counties, Nevada does not have a statewide energy-efficient fleet requirement.

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Updated: July 2017

Executive Order 2016-03 sets updated goals of reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the state passenger vehicle fleet by 30 percent on a metric-ton basis by 2030, as compared to a 2010 baseline. This executive order supersedes Executive Order 2011-01, which required every state agency to comply with the Clean Fleets Program (CFP).

Last Updated: July 2017

New Jersey follows federal guidelines and requires 75% of light duty, non-emergency vehicles to be alternative fuel vehicles. 

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Updated: July 2017

Alternative Fuel Acquisition Act, signed into law in 2002 and amended in 2007, requires that 75% of vehicles bought by state agencies and educational institutions meet or exceed national CAFE standards, are hybrid vehicles, are capable of using alternative fuel, or are plug-in electric vehicles. The Energy, Conservation, and Management division (ECMD) of the New Mexico Energy, Minerals, and Natural Resources Department (EMNRD) is required to compile and submit an annual report to the Governor and the Legislature evaluating the status and effectiveness of the Act. The state has an Alternative Fuels Program Manager who coordinates reporting for statutory requirements related to transportation and promotes New Mexico-produced gaseous fuels. The manager also promotes, coordinates, monitors, and implements state alternative fuel transportation programs to include mass transit demonstration projects and petroleum reduction strategies. 

As part of New Mexico's "Lead by Example" initiatives set forth in Executive Order 2007-053, it shall be the goal of all Executive Branch state agencies to achieve a 20 percent usage reduction below 2005 levels in the state fleet and transportation-related activities by 2015 based on the average transportation-related energy usage per state employee. Through a rideshare program, the state promotes multimodal and efficient motor transport.

New Mexico will be developing a strategic plan to advance the building of natural gas vehicle infrastructure and adoption of natural gas vehicles. The state will also be developing an outline for a pilot project that highlights how CNG can be utilized in New Mexico.

Last Updated: July 2017

New York does not have an overall fleet efficiency standard or target, however, the state is partnering with municipalities to expand state and local ownership of electric vehicles. Additionally, NYSERDA and the NYPA are working with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to reduce its energy consumption. 

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Updated: August 2017

The North Carolina Department of Administration must give purchase preference to new state vehicles with fuel economy ratings that rank among the top 15% of comparable vehicles in their class. 

A Fiscal Year 04-05 “special budget provision” required a 20% reduction (adjusted to 17.5 based on provision criteria) in petroleum use by the state vehicle fleet. The 2011 NC General Assembly extended this Petroleum Displacement Plan (PDP) requirement through FY 2016, allowing for a more robust comparison and foundation for petroleum reduction planning.

The State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Program requires covered fleets to either acquire alternative fuel vehicles (AFV) as a percentage of their annual light-duty vehicle acquisitions or to employ other petroleum-reduction methods in lieu of acquiring AFVs. DOE established these requirements through 10 CFR Part 490.

Last Updated: July 2017

No policy in place or proposed

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Updated: July 2017

Executive Order 2007-02S ordered each state agency to reduce their fuel consumption. Ohio law (Revised Code Section 123.011 (F)(1)) requires each state agency to develop average fuel economy standards. Each state agency submits data to calculate average fuel economy, per each state agency. There are 47 state agencies that have fleets with a variety of vehicles, and the average fuel economy was 17.4 mpg in fiscal year 2009.

By executive order there is a requirement for continuous improvement, which effectively sets a default target to do better than the previous year (>17.4). Fiscal year 2010 fleet plans are now being submitted and will be compared to the fuel economy baseline. The baseline and one subsequent year's data is necessary to establish a realistic target by rule.

Last Updated: July 2017

No policy in place or proposed.

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Updated: July 2017

The Oregon Department of Administrative Services, responsible for managing the state's public agency vehicle fleet, has a goal of increasing the average fleet miles-per-gallon 10% by 2020, from a 2007 baseline. This target is included as an official Key Performance Metric (KPM) in the agency's Annual Performance Progress Report. According to Oregon's 2016 progress report, the program has increased fleet fuel efficiency by 8.2% over the 2007 baseline and is on track to achieve this target by 2020.

Additionally, the Oregon Department of Administrative Service’s Statewide Fleet Management Policy (#107-009-040) discusses fleet efficiency in two sections:

  • Regarding the efficient and economical use of state vehicles, underutilized vehicles are subject to reassignment or sale, and high-efficiency vehicles are prioritized for high-usage scenarios, where their comparative efficiency produces the greatest gains. 
  • For purchasing new vehicles, a mandatory Total Cost of Ownership analysis prioritizes alternative-fuel or Hybrid vehicles meeting the 1992 Energy Policy Act (EPACT) requirements, followed by Low-Emission II standard gas vehicles, and then standard gas vehicles. The state fleet motor pool also has a dispatch prioritization policy that recommends Natural Gas Vehicles (NGVs) to those commuting within the rated distance of the NGV tank. In other words, if you are driving to a destination for state business that is within the range that one tank of natural gas, then the state employee, absent a special request, is assigned an NGV.

While not efficiency-focused, the Oregon Department of Energy had been recognized for its alternative fuel efforts. 

Last Updated: August 2017

No policy in place for energy efficiency requirements for state vehicle fleet.

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included. 

Last Updated: July 2017

Per the new Executive Order 15-17, the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance ("DCAMM"), within the Department of Administration, in coordination with OER, is developing strategies for reducing fossil fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions from the State fleet, with the goal of ensuring that a minimum of 25 percent of new light-duty state fleet purchases and leases will be zero-emissions vehicles by 2025.

Executive Order 05-13 (August 22, 2005) requires that state fleet purchases of motor vehicles comply with the Energy Policy Act of 1992 by ensuring that a minimum of 75% of new vehicles purchased are alternative fuel vehicles and the remaining 25% are hybrid-electric vehicles. All new light duty-trucks in the state fleet will achieve a minimum of 19 mpg city for the fleet and be certified as at least a low-emission vehicle. All new passenger vehicles will achieve a minimum of 23 mpg city for the state fleet. The order also discourages the purchase of sport utility vehicles, calling on all state agencies to purchase the most economical, fuel-efficient and low emission vehicles appropriate to the mission.

The Lead by Example initiative has given Rhode Island state government an opportunity to lead by example by increasing the number of zero-emissions and partial-zero-emission vehicles (electric, hybrid electric) and compressed natural gas vehicles in the State Fleet. As of May 22nd, 30 vehicles have been ordered. Increasing the number of zero-emissions vehicles is a critical part of the States goal to reduce both transportation related air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Electric, hybrid electric and compressed natural gas vehicles can help increase energy security, improve fuel economy, lower fuel costs, and reduce emissions.

Last Updated: July 2017

State agencies purchasing motor vehicles must give preference to hybrid, plug-in hybrid electric, biodiesel, hydrogen, fuel cell, or flexible fuel vehicles when the performance, quality, and anticipated lifecycle costs are comparable to other available motor vehicles.

Section 1-11-220 (e) requires the Division of Motor Vehicle Management to “acquire motor vehicles offering optimum energy efficiency for the tasks to be performed; 1-11-220 (g) requires it to “improve environmental quality in this State by decreasing the discharge of pollutants.” Additional legislation is pending.

Last Updated: July 2017

While South Dakota utilizes flex fuel vehicles and promotes the use of ethanol blends in fleet vehicles, the state does not have a statewide energy-efficient fleet requirement. 

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Updated: July 2017

Tennessee Code Annotated §4-3-1109 (Energy Efficient State Vehicles) establishes the goal that 100% of newly purchased passenger vehicles be energy-efficient vehicles or alternative fuel motor vehicles. Energy efficient vehicles are defined as flexible fuel vehicles; hybrid-electric vehicles; a compact fuel-efficient vehicle defined as a vehicle powered by unleaded gasoline that has an EPA-estimated highway gasoline mileage rating of at least 25 miles per gallon or greater for the model year purchased; an electric vehicle; a vehicle powered by natural gas; or a vehicle powered by ultra-low sulfur diesel that meets Bin 5, Tier II emission standards mandated by the U.S. EPA and that has an EPA-estimated highway mileage rating of at least thirty miles per gallon or greater for the model year purchased.

As of June 30, 2016, the State owned 508 energy-efficient passenger motor vehicles, including 372 flex fuel vehicles, 72 hybrids, 5 electric, and 79 energy-efficient vehicles that have an average highway fuel economy of at least 25 MPG. Included in these totals are 47 vehicles that were purchased during FY2016, all of which were energy-efficient. The State met its target goal of purchasing 100% energy-efficient passenger vehicles in FY2016.   .

Tennessee statute requires that 25% of newly purchased vehicles used in EPA-designated nonattainment areas must be hybrid electric vehicles, provided that such vehicles are available at the time of procurement. For areas not designated as nonattainment areas, the 25% requirement can be met with compact fuel efficient vehicles in addition to hybrid electric vehicles.

TCA § 4-3-1105(17) also requires the Department of General Services "provide State vehicle energy management life-cycle (operational and maintenance) cost analysis."   

State governments that operate, lease, or control a fleet of 50 or more light-duty vehicles within the United States must comply with the Federal Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992. In order to meet the requirements of EPAct, 75% of all newly acquired light duty vehicles in Nashville, Knoxville, Chattanooga, Memphis, and the Tri-Cities must be alternative fuel vehicles. Clean diesel fuels, propane, and compressed natural gas conversion vehicles are now available through established statewide contracts.

The Department of General Services' Division of Motor Vehicle Management is actively developing a strategic plan for each agency to reduce, if possible, their number of miles traveled and/or their number of vehicles in service that is specifically tailored to match the agency's fleet profile. The overall objective is to reduce cost and secondary to increase the use of alternative fuel sources. 

Last Updated: August 2017

In accordance with SB 700 of 2013, each state agency and institution of higher education is required to create a plan that sets a goal for reducing gasoline usage. Also, the State Vehicle Management Plan contains low-emission and alternative fuel vehicle purchase requirements.

TXDoT, the largest state fleet, is in the process of reducing its fleet by 37%.

Last Updated: July 2017

In 2014, Utah established a target for 50% of all state fleet vehicles to run on compressed natural gas by July 1, 2018 (S.B. 99). In addition, Utah Transit Authority received a $5.4 million low- or no-emission vehicle deployment grant this year from the Federal Transit Administration for the purchase of five electric buses. The new vehicles will support service from downtown Salt Lake City to the University of Utah, which partnered with UTA in securing the grant. 

HB110 (March 2007) “State Fleet Efficiency Requirements” is intended to accomplish three goals: (1) reduce fleet costs or increase energy efficiency; (2) improve air quality by decreasing the carbon output from state vehicles; and (3) reduce the state’s dependence on foreign oil. It requires agencies that use state fleet vehicles to design programs that will reduce fleet costs by increasing energy efficiency through decreasing the volume of fuel used, increasing fleet mpg, and implementing improved maintenance of vehicles, among other approaches. As part of H.B. 110, the Utah State Fleet works to reduce fleet operation's vehicle count, reduce operating costs, and increase total miles per gallon (MPG). Utah's FY2016 report describes the state's progress. The Division of Fleet Operations (DFO) reduced the number of their vehicles by 65 to help implement their first goal. DFO also reduced its operating costs from $4,176,890 in FY 2015 to $3,887,160 in FY 2016. Finally, DFO reduced the total miles driven between FY 2015 to FY 2016 from 80,402,859 to 79,755,324 despite an increase in total number of gallons consumed (134,506 additional gallons) and higher average MPG from 14.3 in FY 2015 to 13.8 in FY 2016.  Between FY 2012 and FY 2016, that resulted in a total miles reduction of 631,624.

Last Updated: July 2017

Executive Order 15-12, the Governor's Climate Cabinet and State Agency Climate Action Plan, requires that the state “purchase vehicles that have the highest available fuel efficiency in each respective vehicle class (e.g., passenger cars, light duty trucks, etc.) pursuant to performance specifications recommended by the state operations working group established under section I (J). These performance standards should include consideration of vehicles that not only meet high fuel economy standards but that also provide lower total emissions of greenhouse gases, criteria pollutants, and hazardous air contaminants.”

Executive Order 15-12, the Governor's Climate cabinet and State Agency Energy Plan, required that the State Operations Working Group establish vehicle performance standards for use by state entities when considering the purchase of vehicles. The State Operations Working Group determined that when state agencies are purchasing light duty fleet vehicles they should consider (in this order) using the EPA Fuel Economy and Environment Label associated with the vehicle type to be purchased:

  1. The Fuel Economy & Greenhouse Gas Rating. If vehicles have the same Rating then,
  2. Consider the vehicle Smog Rating. If vehicles have the same smog rating then,
  3. Consider the Fuel Economy, and if all three ratings are the same then the purchaser will,
  4. Consider Price.  

 

In addition, as part of the Vermont Action Plan associated with the multi-state ZEV MOU, the state will “establish goals to ensure that a minimum of 25 percent of new light-duty state fleet purchases and leases, for applicable uses, will be ZEVs by 2025.” 

Last Updated: July 2017

Executive Order 19, signed by Governor Bob McDonnell in July 2010, expired when the new Governor issued Executive Order 31 in October 2014. State vehicle fleet energy efficiency requirements are not addressed in EO 31. However, the Virginia Department of General Services includes in its policies and procedures guidelines for the purchase of fuel-efficient, low-emission state-owned vehicles, when practicable. In addition, DGS’s leasing vehicles guidelines encourage the use of compact, fuel-efficient, and low-emission vehicles.

The state included in the 2014 Virginia Energy Plan (VEP) a goal to increase the number of natural gas, propane, and electric vehicles in state and local government fleets to 300 by the end of 2017. Virginia’s fleet conversion program directs up to $9 million in federal Congestion Mitigation Air Quality (CMAQ) and state matching funds to pay the incremental costs of these vehicles. Vehicles that receive this funding must be garaged in areas that do not meet the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone, carbon monoxide, or particulate matter (nonattainment areas) and for former nonattainment areas that are now in compliance (maintenance areas). 

The Commonwealth also offers temporary “bridge” and long-term loans to state agencies and localities in both non-attainment and attainment areas, as well as loans for alternative fueling and electric vehicle charging infrastructure. These programs support the alternative fuel vehicle recommendation made by a working group of the Virginia Climate Change and Resiliency Update Commission.

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Updated: July 2017

The Washington State Electric Fleet Initiative, launched in December 2015, established the goal that at least 20% of all new state passenger vehicle purchases would be electric vehicles by 2017. Currently the state fleet includes more than 120 EVs. The delivery of an additional 130 long-range EVs (220 mile range) is now underway.  

Washington state agencies must phase in fuel economy standards to achieve an average fuel economy of 36 miles per gallon for passenger vehicle fleets by 2015 (RCW 43.41.130). State agencies must purchase ultra-low carbon fuel vehicles or, when purchasing new conventional vehicles, achieve an average fuel economy of 40 miles per gallon (mpg) for light-duty passenger vehicles and 27 mpg for light-duty vans and sport utility vehicles. When calculating average fuel economy, emergency response vehicles, passenger vans with a gross vehicle weight rating of 8,500 pounds or greater, off-road vehicles, ultra-low carbon fuel vehicles, and vehicles driven less than 2,000 miles per year are excluded.

The largest fuel use in in State Government is the Washington State Department of Transportation ferry system. Washington State Ferries operates the largest ferry system in the United States. In 2013, Washington completed installation bio-fuel blending systems to reduce fleet CO2 impacts. In addition, Government Fleet magazine recognized DOT Fleet Operations for the fourth consecutive year as one of the nation's top 40 most sustainable and efficient public fleets, presenting WSDOT with a 2012 Green Fleet Award.

Governor’s Executive Order 05-01 (signed by Governor Locke January 2005) directs agencies to give priority to the purchase and use of hybrid and other fuel efficient/low emission vehicles and new petroleum-efficient technology vehicles. State agencies were further directed to prioritize purchase of plug-in electric (PEV, such as the Nissan Leaf) and plug-in hybrid (PHEV, such as the Chevrolet Volt) light- and medium-duty vehicles where anticipated driving range will not require routine charging in the field and lifecycle costs are within 5 percent of an equivalent hybrid (HEV, such as the Toyota Prius) (RCW 43.19.648).

The State Administrative and Accounting Manual (SAAM 12.20.30c) established rules regarding minimum annual days of use and mileage requirements for state-owned vehicles. The utilization requirement eliminates all non-essential and cost-inefficient state fleet vehicles. The most fuel inefficient vehicles were removed from the fleet and petroleum use reduced as a right-sizing result. 

Executive Order 1039 puts a freeze on the purchase of four-wheel drive support utility vehicles.

WSDOT Secretary’s Executive Order E 1094 directs employees to minimize idling time in all aspects of WSDOT’s operation.

WSDOT Secretary’s Executive Order E 1047 directs employees to conserve fuel whenever possible by eliminating the need for business travel by using telecommunications, the most energy efficient vehicles, or combining vehicle trips.

Last Updated: July 2017

The Governor’s Natural Gas Vehicle Task Force was created by executive order in June 2012. Among 16 recommendations issued by the task force and outlined in its final report is a minimum goal of transitioning twenty-five percent (25%) of the state fleet to NGVs in four years. The task force also recommended the inclusion of bi-fuel vehicles on the state fleet’s RFP. The W.Va. Purchasing Division includes an alternative fueling mechanism for every vehicle classification. Vendors are also required to provide the federal mpg for each vehicle classification, which is given bid award consideration. 

Last Updated: July 2017

The Wisconsin Department of Administration's fleet management policy requires all state agencies to collectively reduce gasoline use by at least 20% by 2010 and 50% by 2015 in state-owned vehicles as compared to the total amount used in 2006. In addition, state agencies must reduce petroleum-based diesel fuel use by 10% by 2010 and 25% by 2015.

The department shall, whenever feasible and cost-effective, encourage all state agencies to collectively reduce the usage of gasoline and diesel fuel in state-owned vehicles that is petroleum based by at least 20% for gasoline by 2015 and 10% for diesel by 2015 as compared to the total amount used in 2006.

Last Updated: July 2017

No policy in place or proposed

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Updated: July 2017