State and Local Policy Database

Interconnection Standards

Interconnection standards define how a CHP system (or any other kind of distributed generation, like photovoltaic arrays or wind turbines) can physically connect to the grid. To remain economically viable, CHP systems and other distributed generation (DG) technologies rely on the ability to purchase backup power from the electric grid, and to sell excess electricity they generate back to it. The lack of a consistent standard that explicitly establishes parameters and procedures for connecting to the grid drives up both monetary and transaction costs for technology manufacturers and owners, discouraging CHP deployment. Interconnection standards that support CHP are uniform and transparent and do not allow room for arbitrary delays.
Interconnection Standards:

Alabama has not implemented statewide interconnection standards.  In response to the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005, the state examined existing interconnection agreements with utilities and determined that, except for a few provisions which were addressed by the state, existing interconnection agreements addressed best practices for distributed generation and concluded that no statewide standards were necessary.

Last Updated: July 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Alaska’s interconnection standards are only applicable to systems 25kW and smaller, and only to those powered by renewable fuels, including biomass. The state has not established an overall standard for interconnection processes, but instead will review each regulated utility’s interconnection standard to judge for “reasonableness.” The Regulatory Commission of Alaska considered interconnection requirements for non-utility generators connecting to the Muncipal Light and Power (ML&P) electric system in Anchorage in a docket that is now closed.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

In June 2007, the Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) initiated a rulemaking process to establish statewide interconnection standards for distributed generation. This proceeding is still in progress. Draft rules released June 26, 2015 are available here and a ruling is still pending, but the commission has recommended utilities use the draft regulation until regulations are finalized.

The state's utilities independently developed interconnection agreements for distributed generation (DG) prior to the ACC's ongoing proceeding to establish statewide standards. The Salt River Project, Tucson Electric Power, and Arizona Public Service—the state’s major utilities—have all established their own interconnection procedures. It is likely that the state’s regulated utilities will adopt the ACC’s interconnection standards when final rules are adopted.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Standard Interconnection Agreement

Description: Distributed generation facilities that can be net-metered are able to interconnect using the state’s standard interconnection agreement. Only renewable energy-powered generators are eligible, including biomass. Systems may not be larger than 300kW at non-residential facilities, and an external disconnect switch is only required for some systems.

Last Updated: July 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Rule 21

Description: California was among the first states to establish a standard interconnection policy for distributed generation. Approved in 2000, Rule 21 applies to CHP and other DG systems up to 10 MW. It has been adopted as a model by all three major investor-owned utilities and follows the established technical guidelines of the IEEE 1547 interconnection standard.

In September 2012, the California Public Utilities Commission enacted several major changes to Rule 21 for the first time since 2000. Changes include a "fast track" application process for systems that meet certain size standards, as well as several detailed study options for larger facilities.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Code of Colorado Regulations 723-3

Description: Modeled very closely on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (FERC) interconnection standard for small generators, Colorado’s interconnection standards are a product of its Renewable Energy Standard, adopted in 2005. Like the FERC standard, Colorado delineates three distinct tiers of interconnection to cover systems up to 10MW in size. CHP is explicitly eligible for interconnection under these standards. In the 2008, the Colorado House of Representatives enacted H.B. 1160, requiring municipal utilities to essentially adopt the PUC's interconnection rules.

The PUC adopted new rules for net metering in September 2009, as required by SB 51. The new rules made relaxed some of the insurance requirements for interconnection, and addressed utility concerns with highly seasonal circuits and voltage flicker.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Connecticut General Statute § 16-243a

Description: Approved in 2007, Connecticut’s interconnection standard applies to distributed generation, including CHP, up to 20MW in size. This standard pertains to the two investor-owned utilities in the state, and separates distributed generation into three distinct tiers based upon system size. These tiers mirror those of FERC’s interconnection standards, upon which Connecticut’s standards are closely based.

Connecticut's guidelines include a standard interconnection agreement and application fees that vary by system type. However, they are stricter than FERC's standards and differ in several significant ways, including the requirement of an external disconnect switch and an interconnection transformer, the requirement for customers to indemnify their utility against "all causes of action," and the requirement to maintain liability insurance in specified amounts based on the system's capacity.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Delmarva Power & Light, Delaware's only investor-owned electric utility, has four basic levels of interconnection based on system size and system type. Delaware Electric Cooperative has two tiers. All forms of CHP including fossil- and renewable-fueled systems of up to 10 MW are eligible for interconnection in Delaware.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: District of Columbia Small Generator Interconnection Rules (DCSGIR)

Description: In February 2009, the District of Columbia Public Service Commission (DCPSC) adopted interconnection regulations that apply to systems up to 10 MW that are operated in parallel with the electric distribution system and not subject to the interconnection requirements of PJM. Four tiers are laid out with various criteria systems seeking to interconnect. IEEE 1547 is generally used as a technical standard for evaluation. External disconnect switches are not required for systems below 10 kW, but are required for all other systems. Systems larger than 1 MW require liability insurance.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Florida Public Service Commission Rule 25-6.065

Description: The Florida Public Service Commission adopted its interconnection standard in March 2008. The standards, which apply to distributed generation systems up to 2MW in size, delineate three separate tiers of interconnection based upon system size. The interconnection rule applies only to generation using renewable fuels, but includes waste heat in its definition of “renewable energy.” Some CHP systems may be interpreted as using “waste heat” as a primary fuel, but there is no wording that clearly defines CHP as eligible for interconnection using this standard.

Last Updated: July 2017

Interconnection Standards:

There is currently no interconnection standard in place that applies to CHP.

For more information on interconnection standards, click here.

Last Updated: July 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Hawaii Public Utilities Commission Order 24159

Description: In April 2008, The Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO), Hawaii’s largest electric utility, adopted, by order 24159, enhanced and improved interconnection regulations for distributed generation. Order 24159 makes changes to the existing interconnection standard applicable to HECO, Rule 14H. The new rules do not explicitly state that CHP is an eligible technology. The standard, which is based upon the IEEE 1547 standard, offers no explicit limit on size of system, but there are clearly expedited processes for systems smaller than 100kW.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

There is currently no interconnection standard in place that applies to CHP.

For more information on interconnection standards, click here.

Last Updated: July 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Illinois Senate Bill 680

Description: Though currently only “emergency rules,” in response to the lack of a formal rulemaking by the deadline of April 1, 2008 set by the enabling legislation, the Illinois Corporation Commission is considering an interconnection standard that would explicitly include CHP. The current in-place emergency rules do include CHP, and are based upon the IEEE 1547 Standard. Four tiers of interconnection are delineated, separating interconnection into different size categories up to 10MW.  In March 2010, the ICC established interconnection standards for Large Distributed Generation Facilities, or those over 10 MW.

Last Updated: July 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Indiana Administrative Code, Title 170, Article 4

Description: Established in 2005, Indiana’s interconnection regulations delineate three distinct tiers of interconnection, and CHP is explicitly eligible. There is no size limit established for CHP systems, but systems larger than 2 MW are subject to increased fees for required pre-interconnection studies. In general, it is easier to interconnect if a system adheres to the IEEE 1547 standards.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Iowa Interconnection Standard

Description: In Iowa, rate regulated utilities include only the state's two investor-owned utilities, MidAmerican Energy and Interstate Power and Light (IPL), and Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative. Iowa's detailed interconnection standards apply to distributed generation facilities of up to 10 megawatts (MW). The definition of a distributed generation facility includes qualifying facilities (QFs) under PURPA and alternative energy production (AEP) facilities as defined by Iowa law. The rules are contained in IAC § 199-45 adopted by the IUB in January 2017. Like many recent interconnection regulation adoptions in other states, the Iowa rules set four levels of review for interconnection requests.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Net Metering and Easy Connection Act

Description: In May 2009, the State adopted the Net Metering and Easy Connection Act (House Bill 2369), establishing general interconnection rules for distributed generation systems. The rules only apply to renewable sources of distributed generation (and presumably renewable-fired CHP), and only apply to systems with capacities up to 200 kW. If a customer meets all safety and interconnection requirements, utilities may not require additional liability insurance. The rules (KAR 82-17-1, et seq.) were adopted by the Kansas Corporation Commission in July 2010.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Kentucky Interconnection Standard

Description: Applicable only to systems powered by biomass or biogas, Kentucky’s interconnection standard also only is available to systems 30kW or below.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Louisiana Interconnection Standard, La. R.S. 51:3061

Description: Louisiana requires that regulated utilities offer interconnection to distributed generation systems powered by renewable fuels. The interconnection standard includes fuel cells and microturbines as eligible for interconnection, though they must be fully fueled by renewable fuels such as biomass. The maximum system size is 300kW for non-residential applications.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Docket No. 2009-219 - Order Adopting Interconnection Rule

Summary:  In January 2010, Maine's Public Utility Commission (PUC) adopted interconnection procedures. These rules apply to all transmission and distribution utilities operating in Maine. The interconnection procedures set four tiers of review for interconnection requests for all eligible technologies and systems subject to Maine PUC jurisdiction. The four tiers are not subject to jurisdiction of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC).

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Code of Maryland Regulations Title 20, Subtitle 50, Chapter 9: Small Generator Interconnection Standards

Description: Enacted by the Maryland Senate in 2007 and effective 2009, Maryland’s small generator interconnection rules delineate four distinct tiers of interconnection, and the smallest systems are not subject to fees to apply for interconnection. The rules cover interconnection for systems up to 10 MW in size, and specifically allow for the interconnection of CHP. Systems must adhere to the standards promulgated in IEEE 1547.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Massachusetts Distributed Generation Interconnection Rules

Description: Massachusetts’ investor-owned utilities use an established interconnection process for all distributed generation, including CHP. There are three tiers of interconnection, corresponding with increased system scrutiny and fees. There is no set limit on system size, but a more extensive system impact study may be required on systems larger than 1MW, and is definitely required for systems larger than 5MW.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Michigan Public Service Commission Order, Case # U-13745

Description: Michigan’s interconnection standard delineates five separate tiers of interconnection, and covers systems of all sizes with the largest interconnection tier – 2MW systems and above. However, utilities are the final arbiters of which types of systems and sizes are suitable for their distribution systems. Fees for interconnection range from $100 to $500, depending on system size.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

The Minnesota Public Service Commission initiated a new docket to update its interconnection standards in June 2016. The Commission will re-examine the Minnesota Standards for Interconnection of Distributed Generation that were established in September 2004 in Docket E-999/CI-01-1023. The existing standards delineate uniform procedures applicable to all investor-owned utilities, apply to systems up to 10 MW in size, and include CHP systems. Several aspects of the review process are different depending on the size of system. 

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

There is currently no interconnection standard in place that applies to CHP.

For more information on interconnection standards, click here.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Missouri Interconnection Guidelines

Description: Missouri requires that utilities offer interconnection to distributed generation systems of 100kW or less, provided they are powered by renewable fuels, including fuel cells.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Montana's interconnection standards apply to all small-generators of electricity (including CHP) up to 10 MW in size, regardless of fuel type. These interconnection standards apply to the two regulated electric utilities in the state, which constitute a majority of the state’s customers and retail sales. The standard has multiple tiers of interconnection, allowing for expedited approval for smaller systems.

Last Updated: July 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Nebraska Interconnection Standard

Description: Nebraska’s interconnection standard only applies to systems 25kW and smaller, and only to those powered by renewable fuels such as biomass.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Nevada Interconnections Standard

Description: In December 2003, the Nevada Public Utilities Commission (PUC) adopted interconnection standards for customers of Nevada Power and Sierra Pacific Power with on-site generation up to 20 megawatts (MW) in capacity. These standards are largely consistent with IEEE 1547 standards, California's interconnection rule (California Rule 21) and the model interconnection agreement developed by the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC). Nevada Power and Sierra Pacific Power have incorporated the standards into their tariffs as Rule 15. These standards apply only to CHP fueled by biogas, biomass, LFG, municipal solid waste, or tire-derived fuel.

Last Updated: July 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: New Hampshire Interconnections Standard

Description: The New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission (PUC) established interconnection rules for net-metered systems up to 1 MW in January 2001. Systems that connect to the grid using inverters that meet IEEE 1547 and UL 1741 safety standards do not require an external disconnect device. However, the customer-generator assumes all risks and consequences associated with the absence of a switch. Utilities may not require customer-generators to perform additional tests, or pay for additional interconnection-related charges. Insurance is not required.

Last Updated: June 2016

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: New Jersey Administrative Code 14:4-9

Description: New Jersey provides for interconnection of distributed generation systems, which, though not explicitly inclusive of CHP, can include CHP at the discretion of the applicable electric distribution company. These standards are applicable to the state’s investor-owned utilities. There are three separate levels of interconnection, and systems up to 2MW in size are covered by the interconnection standard. There are varying fees that scale up in accordance with system size, and varying degrees of review that must occur before a system can interconnect.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: New Mexico Public Regulation Commission (PRC) rules 568 (NMAC 17.9.568) and 569 (NMAC 17.9.569)

Description: Adopted by the PRC in July 2008, New Mexico’s interconnection rules simplify the interconnection requirements of qualifying facilities up to 10 MW in capacity, and specifically allow for the interconnection of CHP. Four levels of capacity are distinguished, with smaller capacity systems requiring less stringent interconnection processes. All systems are required to comply with applicable local and national utility standards—including NEC, IEEE, and UL standards—and disconnect switches are required on all systems. The PRC may require a generating facility to obtain insurance, and interconnection customers are required to pay reasonable application fees. Municipal utilities are exempt from these standards, as they are not regulated by the PRC.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: New York State Standardized Interconnection Requirements and Application Process for New Distributed Generators 5 MW or Less Connected in Parallel with Utility Distribution Systems (SIR)

Description: In 1999, New York became the second state in the country to adopt an interconnection standard and they have been periodically revised since. A 2015 REV Order directed the implementation of a process to raise the threshold applicability from 2 MW and the SIR was updated in March 2016 to apply to systems up to 5 MW. The standard is consistent with IEEE’s 1547 interconnection standard and explicitly allows for the interconnection of CHP systems. While the NYSIR interconnection standard applies up to 5 MW, the utilities with service territory covering the majority of the state have procedures that include systems up to 20 MW.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: North Carolina Utilities Commission Docket No. E-100, Sub 101

Description: Applicable only to investor-owned utilities, the interconnection standards adopted by the North Carolina Utilities Commission as a result of this docket lays out three separate tiers of interconnection, in much the same manner as the FERC standards. Systems over 2MW in size must go through a more extensive study than smaller systems, and application fees scale up in line with system size.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

There is currently no interconnection standard in place that applies to CHP.

For more information on interconnection standards, click here.

Last Updated: July 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Ohio Administrative Code 4901:1-22

Description: In 2007, Ohio adopted new interconnection standards applicable to distributed generation, including CHP. Ohio’s interconnection standards now separate interconnection into three tiers, to allow for easier and more streamlined applications for the smallest generators and a similarly streamlined application for larger generators that are still smaller than 2MW. A third tier provides a process for generators up to 20MW. A plain-language guide to interconnection accompanies the new tiered system. Ohio’s standards are also compatible with IEEE’s 1547 interconnection standard.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

There is currently no interconnection standard in place that applies to CHP.

For more information on interconnection standards, click here.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Oregon Public Utility Commission Order No. 07-319, Order No. 09-196

Description: Oregon has three separate interconnection standards and several interconnection standards particular to different utilities. One standard is for the interconnection of non-net metered small generator facilities up to 10MW, one is for non-net metered large generator facilities larger than 20MW, and one for net-metered systems. No specific technologies are identified as applicable for interconnection, and CHP is not precluded from interconnecting under any of the standards.

The interconnection standards for specific utilities were adopted in 2007 and delineate standards for systems up to 2MW in size for businesses, and 25 kW for all residential customers. The PGE and PacifiCorp standard delineates multiple levels, or tiers, of interconnection. Systems that are appropriately vetted and 25 kW or smaller can be interconnected under the first level without fee. The second and third levels of interconnection are generally correlated with greater degrees of scrutiny, possible application fees and longer application and approval processes.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Pennsylvania Administrative Code Title 52, Chapter 75, Subchapter C

Description: Pennsylvania, in accordance with its Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards Act of 2004, adopted interconnection standards for DG, including CHP, in August 2006. The standards cover four different tiers of interconnection, up to 5 MW in size. Specific technical screens and timelines are associated with each level of interconnection. Pennsylvania’s standards were based upon the model interconnection standards promulgated by the Mid-Atlantic Distributed Resources Initiative Working Group, and also adhere to the technical standards delineated in the IEEE 1547 interconnection standards.

In October 2016, the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission issued an final order amending interconnection rules that reflected a number of adjustments, including raising the size-limit on customer generation capacity.

Last Updated: August 2017
Interconnection Standards:

In 2011, the Rhode Island General Assembly passed General Law 39-26.3 “Distribution Generation Interconnection,” with the stated finding that “expeditious completion of the application process for renewable distributed generation is in the public interest. In November, 2011 the RI PUC adopted a tariff titled, “RIPUC #2078, Standards for Connected Distributed Generation,” for which CHP is eligible. The tariff is for renewable interconnecting customers as well as interconnecting customers, and, therefore, covers all forms of fuel. Additionally, the tariff applies to systems greater than 10 MW. 

Under tariff #2078, National Grid offers a three-tiered (Simplified, Standard, and Expedited) interconnection processes for distributed generation, including CHP. A project's review path is determined by project characteristics including generation type, size, customer load, and the characteristics of the grid where the system is to be located. Maximum total review days depend on review type, ranging from 15 days for a Simplified Review to 120-150 for a Standard review (usually complex projects). These standards were cited as supportive policies in the 2015 Energy Efficiency Program Plan which was approved by the Rhode Island PUC. 

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: South Carolina PSC Order, Docket No. 2005-387-E

Description: In 2006, the South Carolina Public Service Commission enacted interconnection standards for small distributed generation with a maximum capacity of 100 kW for non-residential systems. The standards do not apply to three-phase generators, and only apply to the state’s four investor-owned utilities. There is a $250 non-residential system application fee as well as minimum $300,000 liability insurance coverage. Redundant external disconnect switches are required. Total interconnection capacity is limited to a maximum of 2% of rated circuit capacity, and there are no codified procedures for dispute resolution.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: South Dakota Public Utilities Commission Rule 20:10:36

Description: The South Dakota Public Utilities Commission adopted its interconnection standards in May 2009. The standards, which apply to customers of investor-owned utilities, delineate four levels of interconnection for systems up to 10 MW in capacity. All interconnections use the IEEE 1547 standards, and South Dakota’s standards call for reasonable timeframes for application and approval. The requirement of external disconnect switches is authorized, limited interconnection to area networks is permitted, and general liability insurance is required

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Tennessee Interconnection orders

Description: On January 5, 2007, the Tennessee Regulatory Authority (TRA) issued orders in dockets 06-00182 and 06-00183 stating that Entergy and Kentucky Utilities had already implemented standards 11 (net metering), 14 (time-based metering), and 15 (interconnection) as described by PURPA 2005, prior to August 8, 2005 and further consideration of those standards by TRA was not required (i.e., declining to make any changes in the existing standards).

In August 2007, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) adopted a modified version of PURPA 2005: "TVA shall make available, upon request, interconnection service, for generators with output of 20 MW or less, to any electric consumer that it serves." As part of its decision, TVA is allowing the distribution utilities that operate in its territory the flexibility to create their own interconnection procedures that are similar to TVA's.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

In response to the 1999 Texas Public Utility Regulatory Act that determined that on-site generation was an entitlement to all customers, the Public Utility Commission of Texas developed generous interconnection regulations, effective 2001. Texas’ rules allow the interconnection of distributed generation, including CHP, up to 10 MW, and do not establish a limit on the total interconnected distributed generation capacity at any one facility. Rules apply to a variety of size tiers, which allow for less restrictive interconnection for systems of smaller sizes. Additionally, the rules establish customer-friendly timelines on approval or rejection of interconnection applications, ensuring proposed projects do not sit in regulatory limbo.

For systems larger than 10 MW, a step-by-step guide on how to interconnect larger distributed generation to the ERCOT transmission grid. The Distributed Generation Interconnection Tool for Texas was developed by the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) and the State Energy Conservation Office (SECO) with support from the US Department of Energy. It can help ensure a successful and timely interconnection process from beginning to end.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

On April 1, 2010, the Utah Public Service Commission (PSC) adopted final rules for interconnection. The rules took effect April 30, 2010 and are based on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (FERC) interconnection standards for small generators, adopted in May 2005 by FERC Order 2006. Utah's rules for interconnection include provisions for three levels of interconnection for systems up to 20 MW, based on system complexity. Interconnection requirements, standards and review procedures are divided into three tiers. While CHP is not specifically defined as an eligible technology, the regulatory rules are interpreted as applicable to all electric generation resources.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Vermont Public Service Board Rule 5.500                               

Description: The Vermont Public Service Board (PSB) developed this interconnection rule for all distributed generation not subject to the state’s net metering rule. Rule 5.500, then, applies to all CHP systems. The PSB does not cap system size, though certain systems are eligible for a “fast track” application process. Systems not eligible for interconnection under the “fast track” mechanism are subject to additional studies and/or screening criteria.

Last Updated: July 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Virginia Interconnection Standard

Description: In 2009 the Virginia State Corporation Commission adopted interconnection rules for those systems that are not net metered. The rules feature three tiers of interconnection, ranging from those under 500kW to those of 20MW. Fees differ depending on system size and a dispute resolution process is stipulated. No fuels or technologies are specified, and none are explicitly precluded.

A separate interconnection standard is applicable to systems that are also net metered. Systems powered by renewable fuels may be net metered.

Last Updated: July 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Washington Administrative Code Chapter 480-108

Description: The Washington Utilities and Transportation Commissionhas adopted interconnection standards for distributed generation systems, including CHP, up to 20MW in size. Two separate tiers for interconnection exist; the first tier applies to systems smaller than 300kW. The second tier applies to systems between 300kW and 20MW, and generally follows the interconnection standards promulgated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC).

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: West Virginia Interconnection Standard

Description: In 2010 the West Virginia Public Service Commission established an order that developed a new interconnection standard. This standard features two tiers of application, up to 2MW in size. CHP is an eligible technology.

Last Updated: July 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapter PSC119

Description: Established in 2004, Wisconsin’s interconnection standards allow for distributed generation, including CHP, up to 15MW in size. To allow for ease of application, interconnection service is divided into four tiers, based upon system size, with strictness of requirements increasing as system size increases.

Last Updated: August 2017

Interconnection Standards:

Policy: Wyoming Interconnection Practices

Description: Wyoming has not actually established an interconnection standard but instead relies on the interconnection requirements imbedded in its net metering rules. Biomass-powered systems up to 25kW are eligible, along with other renewable-fueled systems.

Last Updated: August 2017