State and Local Policy Database

Wyoming

State Scorecard Rank

50

Wyoming

4.5Scored out of 50Updated 9/2016
State Government
Score: 2 out of 7
State Government Summary List All

The state offers several consumer incentives to encourage energy-efficient investments. The state government encourages the use of energy savings performance contracts but does not otherwise lead by example. There are no research centers focused on energy efficiency within the state.

Financial Incentives List All

Financial incentive information for Wyoming is provided by the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE Wyomingand State Energy Office contacts. Information about additional incentives not present on DSIRE is listed here. In addition to the state-funded incentives on DSIRE and below, Wyoming has enabled Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE). The state does not, however, have any active PACE programs. For additional information on PACE, visit PACENation

Last Updated: July 2017

Building Energy Disclosure List All

There is no disclosure policy in place.

Last Updated: July 2017

Public Building Requirements List All

No policy is in place or proposed. However, the Wyoming State Energy Office has a program for local governments which would include an energy audit and retrofits as described in the audit. The intent of this program is to retrofit existing buildings to maximize energy savings and create sustainable reduction in energy usage. A tracking system is being developed to calculate energy savings from these improvements. The program covers both audit and improvements on a cost share basis.

Last Updated: July 2017

Fleets List All

No policy in place or proposed

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Updated: July 2017

Energy Savings Performance Contracting List All

The Wyoming Business Council, in conjunction with the State Energy Office, re-launched the Wyoming Energy Conservation Improvement Program (WYECIP) in 2011. This program provides support for facilities seeking to enter into an ESPC, including model contracts and other documents to assist with implementation of performance contracts.

Last Updated: July 2017

Research & Development List All

No public research centers have a focus on energy efficiency.

Last Updated: July 2017

Important Links List All
Buildings
Score: 1 out of 7
Buildings Summary List All

The state's ICBO Uniform Building Code is voluntary for both residential and commercial buildings and is based on the 1989 MEC. Wyoming has convened a stakeholder advisory group and offers code training and outreach.

Residential Codes List All

Wyoming's residential building code is voluntary. Known as the ICBO Uniform Building Code, it is based on the 1989 MEC and may be adopted and enforced by local jurisdictions. Some jurisdictions have adopted more stringent codes than the voluntary standard: the 8 most populated cities and counties in Wyoming have an energy code that meets or exceeds the IECC 2006 or equivalent. Teton County and Jackson are moving to the IECC 2012; Cheyenne adopted the IECC 2009; Casper, Rock Springs, and Gillette adopted a modified IECC 2006.

Last Updated: August 2017

Commercial Code List All

Wyoming's commercial building code is voluntary. Known as the ICBO Uniform Building Code, it is based on the 1989 MEC and may be adopted and enforced by local jurisdictions. Some jurisdictions have adopted more stringent codes than the voluntary standard: the 8 most populated cities and counties in Wyoming have an energy code that meets or exceeds the IECC 2006 or equivalent.

Last Updated: August 2017

Compliance List All
  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: NA
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: NA
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: Wyoming Conference of Building Officials (WBCO)
  • Training/Outreach: The Wyoming State Energy Office has ongoing seminars available.

Last Updated: September 2016

CHP
Score: 0 out of 4
CHP Summary List All

Wyoming does not have policies in place to encourage the deployment of CHP systems. No new CHP installations were completed in 2015.

Interconnection StandardsList All

Policy: Wyoming Interconnection Practices

Description: Wyoming has not actually established an interconnection standard but instead relies on the interconnection requirements imbedded in its net metering rules. Biomass-powered systems up to 25kW are eligible, along with other renewable-fueled systems.

Last Updated: June 2016

Encouraging CHP as a ResourceList All

There are currently no state policies designed to acquire energy savings from CHP (like other efficiency resources) or energy generation from CHP (in terms of kWh production) that apply to all forms of CHP.

Last Updated: June 2016

Deployment IncentivesList All

There are currently no state policies that provide incentives for CHP deployment.

Last Updated: June 2016

Additional Supportive PoliciesList All

There are currently no additional supportive policies to encourage CHP.

Last Updated: June 2016

Utilities
Score: 0.5 out of 20
Utilities Summary List All

Wyoming has relatively little energy efficiency programming throughout the state. Wyoming Public Service Commission approved demand-side-management programs for Rocky Mountain Power (RMP) that began January 1st, 2009 (see Docket No. 20000-264-EA-06). Supported by the PSC, the portfolio was largely driven by resource needs identified in the utility’s IRP. These programs represent the state’s first significant energy efficiency activity.

Cheyenne Light and Power, Black Hills Power, Carbon Power & Light, Lower Valley Energy and Questar Gas also run limited sets of energy efficiency programs.

The most recent budgets for energy efficiency programs and electricity and natural gas savings can be found in the State Spending and Savings Tables.

Customer Energy Efficiency Programs List All

Wyoming Public Service Commission approved demand-side-management programs for Rocky Mountain Power (RMP) that began January 1st, 2009 (see Docket No. 20000-264-EA-06). These programs represent the state’s first significant energy efficiency activity.

RMP’s 2011 Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) reflected a significant increase in energy efficiency over past planning cycles. The utility forecasts energy efficiency additions through 2030. Currently, RMP offers several rebate programs RMP is responsible for about 57% of electricity sales in Wyoming. Cheyenne Light and Power, Black Hills Power, Carbon Power & Light, Lower Valley Energy and Questar Gas also run limited sets of energy efficiency programs.

The most recent budgets for energy efficiency programs and electricity and natural gas savings can be found in the State Spending and Savings Tables.

Last Updated: July 2016

Energy Efficiency as a Resource List All

There is currently no policy in place that treats energy efficiency as a resource. Wyoming does have an integrated resource planning (IRP) process, although the frequency with which utilities must update these plans is not specified in the state’s rules.

For more information on energy efficiency as a resource, click here.

Last Updated: July 2016

Energy Efficiency Resource Standards List All

There is currently no EERS in place.

For more information on Energy Efficiency Resource Standards, click here

Last Updated: July 2016

Utility Business Model List All

A three-year pilot decoupling program was approved for Questar Gas Company in June 2009 for its General Service class of customers. The pilot began July 1, 2009 and remains in effect. It is adjusted annually (Docket No. 30010-94-GR-8, May 2009).

load management tracking adjustment mechanism is in place for Montana-Dakota Utilities Company to track and recovery lost revenues associated with implementation of load management programs (Docket No. 20004-65-ET-06. Filed on August 31, 2006).

There is currently no policy in place that rewards successful energy efficiency programs.

Last Updated: July 2016

Evaluation, Measurement, & Verification List All
  • Cost-effectiveness test(s) used: TRC, UCT, PCT,SCT, RIM
  • Uses a deemed savings database: no

The evaluation of ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs in Wyoming is not required. Evaluations rely on regulatory orders specified in dockets for each utility and are mainly administered by the Wyoming Public Service Commission. Wyoming uses all of the five classic benefit-cost tests identified in the California Standard Practice Manual. These are the Total Resource Cost (TRC), Utility/Program Administrator (UCT), Participant (PCT), Societal, (SCT), and Ratepayer Impact Measure (RIM). Wyoming specifies the TRC to be its primary test for decision making. The benefit-cost tests are required for overall portfolio level screening. The rules for benefit-cost tests are not specified.

Last Updated: November 2016

Guidelines for Low-Income Energy Efficiency Programs List All

Requirements for State and Utility Support of Low-Income Energy Efficiency Programs

No specific required spending or savings requirements identified.

Cost-Effectiveness Rules for Low-Income Energy Efficiency Programs

Wyoming specifies the TRC test to be its primary test for decision making. The benefit-cost tests are required for overall portfolio level screening. The rules for benefit-cost tests are not specified.

Coordination of Ratepayer-Funded Low-Income Programs with WAP Services

Level of coordination is unclear from publicly available data.

Last updated: April 2017

Self Direct and Opt-Out Programs List All

Rocky Mountain Power offers a self-direct option for customers. The self-direct program is a project-based rate credit program that offers up to an 80% credit of eligible project costs back to customers as a rate credit against the 3.7% cost-recovery mechanism (CRM) charge all customers pay.  Customers earn a credit up to 100% of their CRM charge, but do pay a flat $500/project administrative fee for each self-directed project.  Customers can choose to engage in self-direct and more traditional CRM programs simultaneously, provided the different programs are used to deploy different projects.

Last Updated: July 2016

Data AccessList All

Wyoming has no policy in place that requires utilities to release energy use data to customers or third parties. 

Last Updated: July 2016 

 

Transportation
Score: 1 out of 10
Transportation Summary List All

Wyoming has not focused its efforts on policies to encourage efficient transportation systems, leaving significant room for growth.

Tailpipe Emission Standards List All

No policy in place or proposed.

Last Updated: July 2017

Transportation System Efficiency List All

Transportation and Land Use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: No policy in place or proposed.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Wyoming has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Updated: July 2017

Transit Funding List All

No policy in place or proposed.

Last Updated: July 2017

Incentives for High-Efficiency Vehicles List All

No policy in place or proposed.

Last Updated: July 2017

Equitable Access to Transportation:
Wyoming does not have any state programs in place to incentivize the creation of low-income housing near transit facilities, nor does it consider the proximity of transit facilities when distributing federal Low-Income Housing Tax Credits to qualifying property owners. Last Updated: July 2017
Appliance Standards
Score: 0 out of 2
Appliance Standards Summary List All

Wyoming has not set appliance standards beyond those required by the federal government.

Last Updated: July 2016