State and Local Policy Database

Building Benchmarking, Rating, & Transparency

Energy use information is critical for quantifying and evaluating building energy use patterns in order to develop the most effective ways to reduce energy use in a city’s building stock. Benchmarking and energy use disclosure can also reduce the informational gaps that limit investment in energy efficiency improvements. Additionally, the process of benchmarking itself has been correlated with energy savings. Required public disclosure of energy use information increases the visibility of high-energy-consuming buildings, helping buyers and renters to incorporate energy use into their process of choosing a home or investment. This sub-category includes information on two topics:

  • Commercial Benchmarking and Disclosure Policies – Adoption of a policy requiring energy benchmarking and disclosure; implementation status of policy; training and guidance available regarding compliance with policy; enforcement mechanisms in policy; stipulation in policy regarding availability of disclosed individual building energy use information (i.e. general public, parties to a transaction, or government only); release of a report, database, or other analysis of energy use data.
  • Residential/Multifamily Rating, Benchmarking and Disclosure Policies and Practices – Adoption of a policy requiring energy benchmarking/rating and disclosure; implementation status of policy; training and guidance available regarding compliance with policy; enforcement mechanisms in policy; stipulation in policy regarding availability of disclosed individual building energy use information (i.e. general public, parties to a transaction, or government only); inclusion of a field for energy efficiency features (e.g. documentation of HERS, LEED or other green ratings) in the real estate multiple listing service (MLS) serving the city.
  • Voluntary Benchmarking – Presence of a policy or program that encourages buildings to benchmark energy use through ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager. The program must have been active in 2013-2014, target some or all of the city’s private building stock, and have methods in place to measure participation.

Commercial and multifamily

Albuquerque does not have a benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

As per state law, Arlington has no legal authority to establish mandatory benchmarking requirements. Nevertheless, the city is running a voluntary program that encourages building benchmarking through the Energy Star Portfolio Manager.Additionally, energy efficiency features are included in the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) serving the Arlington area.

Last Updated: May 2017

Commercial and multifamily

Atlanta requires commercial buildings greater than 25,000 square feet to benchmark energy and water use. We could not verify the percentage of building covered nor the compliance rate.

Single-family     

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for single-family home.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for commercial and multifamily buildings. 

Single-family     

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for single-family home.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily 

Austin's Energy Conservation and Audit Disclosure Ordinance (ECAD) requires commercial buildings to obtain ENERGY STAR ratings and disclose ratings to prospective buyers. The city adopted the ordinance in November 2008 and it became effective in 2012. Buildings of five or more units are required to comply with the ECAD.  

Austin’s multifamily ECAD requires multifamily property owners and managers to conduct energy audits every ten years and provide the results to current and prospective residents. A qualified ECAD Energy Professional must perform the audits.  

Single-family 

The ECAD requires audits of single-family homes prior to a sale and audits of large multifamily buildings. This ordinance was adopted in November 2008 and was implemented in June 2009.  Austin MLS, the multiple listing service serving the Austin region, includes fields for energy efficiency features of homes listed on the market.                                                                                         

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for commercial and multifamily buildings.

Single-family     

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for single-family home.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Baltimore does not have a benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updates: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for commercial and multifamily buildings.

Single-family     

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for single-family home.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

In April 2013, the city council adopted the Building Energy Reporting and Disclosure Ordinance (BERDO). The ordinance requires owners of commercial buildings (35,000+ square feet) and multifamily buildings (35+ units or 35,000+ square feet) to report their energy and water annually. The city publicly discloses the building-level energy use information on their website annually. The city provides guides and a help desk to help owners comply. BERDO covers 34% of both commercial and multifamily buildings within the city. 

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

Through Boulder's EnergySmart DSM program, businesses and property owners can benchmark their buildings for free. The 2015 Building Performance Ordinance requires commercial properties to benchmark their energy use. In Boulder, only licensed rental properties in the residential sector have required benchmarking.

Last Updated: October 2015

Commercial and multifamily

Bridgeport does not have a benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Buffalo does not have a benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

The residential sector is subject to the Time of Sale Energy Efficiency Ordinance, which mandates minimum energy efficiency upgrades must be made when buildings are sold. The MLS service covering the Burlington area does not currently include fields for energy-efficient features.

Last Updated: October 2015

Carrboro does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector. The MLS which serves the Carrboro area does not include fields for energy-efficient features.

Last Updated: April 2014

Commercial and multifamily

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for commercial and multifamily buildings.

Single-family     

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for single-family home. CarolinaMLS, the multiple listing service for the Charlotte region, includes energy efficiency categories for the homes listed on the market.

Last updated: March 2019

Charlottesville may not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector, under state law. Energy efficiency measures are included in the MLS serving the Charlottesville area.

Last Updated: October 2015

Commercial and multifamily

The Chicago Energy Use Benchmarking Ordinance requires commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet to benchmark using Portfolio Manager and publicly disclose the information. Owners must provide reports annually and have a trained professional verify their data every three years. The city discloses buildings-specific data to the public on their website. The city adopted the ordinance in September 2013 and it became effective in June 2014.

Chicago offers training and guidance to building owners through a help center hotline. Chicago also worked with local utilities to simplify the data collection process by ensuring owners have access to whole-building energy use data for buildings. The Ordinance currently covers 73% of commercial buildings and 67% of multifamily buildings within the city.

Single-family     

Section 5-16-050 of Chicago's Municipal Code requires residential building owners to disclose a building's natural gas and electricity costs for the previous 12 months at the time of sale. 

Last Updated: May 2019

Commercial and multifamily

California has a statewide benchmarking and disclosure policy, outlined in Assembly Bill 802. As of June 2018, building owners of commercial buildings greater than 50,000 square feet must report and disclose their energy consumption annually. Starting June 2019, the policy extends these requirements to buildings with 17 or more residential utility accounts. In Chula Vista, the policy covers 49% of commercial buildings and 76% of multifamily buildings.

Single-family     

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Cincinnati does not have a mandatory benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties. The city runs the Cincinnati 2030 District, a voluntary benchmarking program for commercial buildings. 

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Cleveland does not have a mandatory benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties. The city runs the Cleveland 2030 District, a voluntary benchmarking program for commercial buildings in the downtown area.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Columbus does not have a mandatory commercial and multifamily benchmarking and disclosure policy. The city launched the Columbus Energy Challenge, a voluntary benchmarking program that aims to reduce energy use in building 50,000 square feet and over by 20% and benchmark 70% of participating buildings by 2020.

Single-family     

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

The city does not have a commercial and multifamily benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Single-family     

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

In December 2016, Denver city council passed the Energize Denver program that requires commercial and multifamily buildings over 25,000 square feet to report their score. The program covers 85% of commercial and multifamily buildings. Denver also has a voluntary program to encourage building benchmarking for commercial and multifamily buildings. Watts To Water is a program dedicated to reducing energy and water use in commercial buildings. Participating buildings must share data in ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager.

Single-family     

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Detroit does not have a benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

Dubuque does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector. The MLS service, which serves the Dubuque area, does not include fields for energy-efficient measures.

Last Updated: October 2013

Commercial and multifamily

El Paso does not have a benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Fort Worth does not have a mandatory benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties. The city’s Business Smart program is a voluntary benchmarking program for commercial buildings. 

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Grand Rapids does not have a mandatory benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties. However, the city established a voluntary 2030 District, with 14 million square feet committed to the initiative. 

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: May 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Hartford does not have a benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties. The city's Energy Improvement District Board is currently considering the adoption of commercial, multifamily, and residential benchmarking policies. 

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updates: May 2019

Commercial and multifamily

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for commercial and multifamily buildings.

Single-family     

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for single-family home.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Honolulu does not have a mandatory benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Houston does not have a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for commercial and multifamily buildings. Houston started a voluntary commercial benchmarking program, the Green Office Challenge, to encourage commercial buildings to benchmark and share their energy usage data. 

Single-family     

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy. The multiple listing service which serves the Houston region, Houston Green MLS, includes many fields for energy efficiency features of homes listed on the market.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Indianapolis does not have a benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for commercial and multifamily buildings.

Single-family     

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for single-family home.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Kansas City passed an energy benchmarking/rating and transparency policy for commercial, public, and multifamily residential buildings through the Energy Empowerment Program. The program requires public buildings greater than 10,000 square feet and commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet to benchmark energy data. The policy covers 70% of commercial buildings and 83% of multifamily buildings in the city. 

Single-family     

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure ordinance.

Last Updated: January 2017

Knoxville encourages but does not require buildings in any sector to benchmark or disclose their energy usage data. The MLS which serves the Knoxville area does not include fields for energy efficiency features.

Last Updated: October 2015

Commercial and multifamily

Knoxville does not have a benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Las Vegas does not have a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for commercial and multifamily buildings.

Single-family     

Las Vegas does not have a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for single-family buildings.

Last updated: March 2019

There are no benchmarking or disclosure requirements in place for commercial buildings. For residential buildings, the state of Kansas requires homebuilders to disclose energy efficiency measures to potential buyers. The MLS service which serves the Lawrence area does not include fields for energy-efficient measures.

Last Updated: October 2015

Commercial and multifamily

Commercial and multifamily buildings comply with the California Energy Commission’s Energy Benchmarking Program. The program covers 53% of commercial and 34% of multifamily building stock in Long Beach. The city does not have its own benchmarking ordinance.

Single-family     

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure ordinance.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

The State of California adopted Assembly Bill (AB) 802 in October of 2015. AB 802 requires commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet and larger to benchmark energy usage annually. Los Angeles adopted an ordinance that builds upon AB 802 and require all buildings over 20,000 square feet (both commercial and residential) to annually benchmark energy and water usage. The ordinance currently requires buildings over 50,000 square feet to comply with the law. The ordinance takes effect for buildings between 20,000 and 50,000 square feet in June 2019. The ordinance covers 76% of commercial buildings and 50% of multifamily buildings.

Single-family     

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure ordinance.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Louisville does not have mandatory programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector. The Office of Sustainability and The Louisville Energy Alliance encourage building owners to voluntarily benchmark their buildings through the Louisville Kilowatt Crackdown.  

Single-family     

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure ordinance.

Last updated: March 2019

Madison does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector. The MLS which serves the Madison area does not include fields for energy efficiency features.

Last Updated: October 2013

Commercial and multifamily

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for commercial and multifamily buildings.

Single-family     

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for single-family home.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Memphis does not have a benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for commercial and multifamily buildings.

Single-family     

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for single-family home.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Miami does not have a benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy. The multiple listing service that serves the Miami region includes energy efficiency fields for features of homes listed on the market.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for commercial and multifamily buildings.

Single-family     

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for single-family home.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Minneapolis requires commercial buildings 50,000 square feet and greater to benchmarking energy consumption and report the data to the city. In 2019, the City Council approved of an ordinance to expand benchmarking requirements to multifamily properties 100,000 square feet and greater. The policy covers 75% of commercial buildings and 72% of multifamily buildings.

Single-family     

The city requires homeowners to disclose their energy consumption at the time of sale.

Last updated: May 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Nashville does not have a mandatory benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for commercial and multifamily buildings.

Single-family     

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for single-family home.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

New Orleans does not have a mandatory benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties. The city runs an internal benchmarking program for municipal operations.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

New York City’s Local Law 84 (LL84) requires commercial buildings larger than 50,000 square feet and groups of buildings on a single tax lot totaling 100,000 square feet or more to benchmark and disclose annual energy data through ENERGY STAR. Local Law 133 expanded LL84 to require buildings 25,000 square feet and greater to benchmark energy usage. Currently, the city’s benchmarking policy covers 88& of commercial buildings and 85% of multifamily buildings. New York City has achieved a compliance rate of 93%. 

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for commercial and multifamily buildings.

Single-family     

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for single-family home.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

California adopted Assembly Bill (AB) 802 requiring all buildings 50,000 square feet and more to benchmark. The city does not have a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure program. AB 802 covers 56% of commercial and 44% of multifamily buildings in Oakland.

Single-family     

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure ordinance. 

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Oklahoma City does not have a benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for commercial and multifamily buildings.

Single-family     

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for single-family home.

Last updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

In December 2016, Orlando passed the Building Energy and Water Efficiency Strategy (BEWES), an energy benchmarking and transparency policy. The policy requires existing commercial and multifamily buildings larger than 50,000 square feet to track whole-building energy use. Building owners must report energy use data to the City annually and make their information transparent to the real estate marketplace. Through another program, the Kilowatt Crackdown, buildings not subject to the City's benchmarking ordinance can voluntarily benchmark energy and water use using ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager. The current programs cover 56% of commercial and 98% of multifamily buildings within the Orlando. The city achieved a compliance rate of 40%. 

Single-family     

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure ordinance.

Last updated: March 2019

Benchmarking is not required for any sector of buildings in Park City. The Park City MLS includes fields for energy-efficient features.

Last Updated: October 2015

Commercial and multifamily

Bill No. 120428 requires commercial and multifamily residential buildings over 50,000 square feet to benchmark and disclose energy usage data. The policy covers 69% of commercial buildings and 82% of multifamily buildings.

Single-family     

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure ordinance.

Last Updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

The State of Arizona prohibits cities from enacting mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policies. The city supports Kilowatt-hour Krackdown, a program created by the Building Owners and Managers Association. The program allows building owners to voluntarily benchmark their energy performance.

Single-family     

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure ordinance.

Last Updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Pittsburgh formally adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure ordinance for commercial buildings over 50,000 square feet. The first compliance deadline was in June 2018, and the corresponding data will be released in 2019. The ordinance covers 67% of commercial buildings. Pittsburgh is currently considering the creation of a voluntary benchmarking program for multifamily buildings as a means to establish best practices before expanding mandatory benchmarking to multifamily buildings. 

Single-family     

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure ordinance.

Last Updated: May 2019

Commercial and multifamily

The city’s Commercial Building Energy Performance Reporting Ordinance requires buildings of 20,000 square feet and greater to benchmark energy performance. The Ordinance covers 55% of commercial buildings.

Single-family     

Portland adopted the Home Energy Score Policy by unanimous decision in 2016. The Policy requires home sellers to disclose home energy performance scores. The home seller must also disclose associated costs and cost-effective approaches to improving efficiency.

Last Updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Providence does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector.

Single-family     

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure ordinance.

Last Updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Raleigh does not have a benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy. The Multiple Listing Service used by the city includes features for energy efficiency.

Last Updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Reno adopted the Energy and Water Efficiency Program in January 2019. The program requires commercial and multifamily buildings 30,000 square feet and greater to benchmark energy and water performace. Building owners must also report the data to the city. The policy currently covers 71% of commercial buildings and 90% of multifamily buildings. The city also created the voluntary ReEnergize Reno program to improve building energy and water efficiency 20% by 2025. Participating buildings must track energy and water data through ENEGRY STAR Portfolio Manager and disclose results to the City of Reno. The city offers technical support to participating properties.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last Update: May 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Richmond does not have the authority to adopt a mandatory benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties. The city has not implemented a voluntary program.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last Updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Riverside complies with the State of California’s Assembly Bill (AB) 802. Per AB 802, owners of commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet must benchmark energy usage. The policy covers 46% of commercial buildings and 77% of multifamily buildings in Riverside. The city has not adopted its own independent benchmarking ordinance.

Single-family     

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure ordinance.

Last Update: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Rochester does not have a benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last Update: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

The State of California adopted Assembly Bill (AB) 802 in October of 2015. It will require commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet and larger to benchmark energy usage annually. California requires commercial buildings to obtain and disclose ENERGY STAR ratings to transactional counter parties and the California Energy Commission at the time of a sale, lease, or financing for the entire building through AB 1130. The policy covers 60% of commercial buildings and 77% of multifamily buildings in Sacramento. The city has not adopted its own benchmarking ordinance.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last Update: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

St. Paul does not have a benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties. The Energize St. Paul initiative included a voluntary benchmarking program for commercial buildings during the summer of 2018.

Single-family    

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last Update: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for commercial and multifamily buildings.

Single-family    

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for single-family home.

Last Update: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Salt Lake City passed the Energy Benchmarking & Transparency ordinance. The ordinance requires commercial buildings 50,000 square feet and greater to begin compliance in 2019. Commercial buildings 25,000 to 50,000 square feet will begin compliance in 2020.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last Updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

San Antonio does not have a benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last Update: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

The State of California adopted Assembly Bill (AB) 802 in October of 2015. AB 802 requires commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet and greater to benchmark energy usage annually. AB 802 covers 64% of commercial and 70% of multifamily buildings. This city is currently exploring the feasibility of adopting its own benchmarking ordinance.

Single-family     

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure ordinance.

Last Update: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Chapter 20 of the San Francisco Environment Code requires all commercial buildings 10,000 square feet and greater to benchmark energy data in ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager. The policy covers 88% of commercial buildings. The city does not require multifamily buildings to participate. The city’s compliance rate is 80%. To date, the program has achieved energy savings of 6.1% among buildings that have benchmarked energy data over the past four years.

Single-family     

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure ordinance.

Last Updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

California Assembly Bill (AB) 802 requires the owners of buildings over 50,000 square feet to benchmark energy usage. San Jose recently passed the Energy and Water Building Performance Ordinance, which will require all privately owned buildings over 20,000 square feet to benchmark energy usage. The Ordinance will require 82% of commercial and multifamily buildings to comply.

Single-family     

San Jose does not have a benchmarking program in place for residential buildings.

Last Updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Seattle formally adopted Municipal Code 22.920 that required commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 20,000 square feet to benchmark energy usage. The public may access building data on an open data map. The benchmarking policy covers 83% of commercial and multifamily buildings.

Single-family     

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure ordinance.

Last Updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

St. Louis adopted the Building Energy Awareness bill. It requires certain buildings to record annual whole-building energy and water consumption data in ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager. City-owned buildings began benchmarking in the first year under the ordinance in 2017. The city required privately-owned commercial buildings 50,000 square feet to comply starting April 2018. Both city- and privately-owned buildings will be required to report their consumption information each year thereafter. The policy covers 71% of commercial buildings.

The city will publish benchmarking data on a public website and produce a report of citywide analysis. The St. Louis High Performance Building Initiative encourages buildings - otherwise not mandated - to benchmark their energy use. The goal of the program is a 25% reduction in building energy consumption by the year 2020.

Single-family    

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure ordinance.

Last Update: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Tampa does not have a benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last Updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for commercial and multifamily buildings.

Single-family     

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for single-family home.

Last Update: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for commercial and multifamily buildings.

Single-family    

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for single-family home.

Last Update: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Virginia Beach does not have a benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties.

Single-family    

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last Updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

The Clean and Affordable Energy Act requires commercial buildings and multifamily buildings over 50,000 square feet to benchmark and publicly disclose energy usage data using ENERGY STAR software. This policy was adopted July 2008, and implementation began in 2010. Disclosure must be done annually, and the District publishes data online. Non-compliance results in a fine. The Act currently covers 49% of commercial and multifamily buildings.

The mayor recently signed the Clean Energy DC Omnibus Act of 2018 and transmitted the bill to the United States Congress. The Act would lower the building benchmarking requirement size to 25,000 square feet by 2021 and 10,000 square feet by 2026.

Single-family     

The city does not have a single-family benchmarking and disclosure ordinance.

Last Updated: March 2019

Commercial and multifamily

Worcester does not have a benchmarking, rating, and disclosure policy for commercial and/or multifamily properties.

Single-family     

The city has not adopted a single-family benchmarking and disclosure policy.

Last Updated: March 2019