State and Local Policy Database

Building Benchmarking, Rating, & Transparency

Energy use information is critical for quantifying and evaluating building energy use patterns in order to develop the most effective ways to reduce energy use in a city’s building stock. Benchmarking and energy use disclosure can also reduce the informational gaps that limit investment in energy efficiency improvements. Additionally, the process of benchmarking itself has been correlated with energy savings. Required public disclosure of energy use information increases the visibility of high-energy-consuming buildings, helping buyers and renters to incorporate energy use into their process of choosing a home or investment. This sub-category includes information on two topics:

  • Commercial Benchmarking and Disclosure Policies – Adoption of a policy requiring energy benchmarking and disclosure; implementation status of policy; training and guidance available regarding compliance with policy; enforcement mechanisms in policy; stipulation in policy regarding availability of disclosed individual building energy use information (i.e. general public, parties to a transaction, or government only); release of a report, database, or other analysis of energy use data.
  • Residential/Multifamily Rating, Benchmarking and Disclosure Policies and Practices – Adoption of a policy requiring energy benchmarking/rating and disclosure; implementation status of policy; training and guidance available regarding compliance with policy; enforcement mechanisms in policy; stipulation in policy regarding availability of disclosed individual building energy use information (i.e. general public, parties to a transaction, or government only); inclusion of a field for energy efficiency features (e.g. documentation of HERS, LEED or other green ratings) in the real estate multiple listing service (MLS) serving the city.
  • Voluntary Benchmarking – Presence of a policy or program that encourages buildings to benchmark energy use through ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager. The program must have been active in 2013-2014, target some or all of the city’s private building stock, and have methods in place to measure participation.

As per state law, Arlington has no legal authority to establish mandatory benchmarking requirements. Nevertheless, the city is running a voluntary program that encourages building benchmarking through the Energy Star Portfolio Manager.Additionally, energy efficiency features are included in the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) serving the Arlington area.

Last Updated: May 2017

Through Boulder's EnergySmart DSM program, businesses and property owners can benchmark their buildings for free. The 2015 Building Performance Ordinance requires commercial properties to benchmark their energy use. In Boulder, only licensed rental properties in the residential sector have required benchmarking.

Last Updated: October 2015

The residential sector is subject to the Time of Sale Energy Efficiency Ordinance, which mandates minimum energy efficiency upgrades must be made when buildings are sold. The MLS service covering the Burlington area does not currently include fields for energy-efficient features.

Last Updated: October 2015

Carrboro does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector. The MLS which serves the Carrboro area does not include fields for energy-efficient features.

Last Updated: April 2014

Charlottesville may not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector, under state law. Energy efficiency measures are included in the MLS serving the Charlottesville area.

Last Updated: October 2015

Dubuque does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector. The MLS service, which serves the Dubuque area, does not include fields for energy-efficient measures.

Last Updated: October 2013

Knoxville encourages but does not require buildings in any sector to benchmark or disclose their energy usage data. The MLS which serves the Knoxville area does not include fields for energy efficiency features.

Last Updated: October 2015

There are no benchmarking or disclosure requirements in place for commercial buildings. For residential buildings, the state of Kansas requires homebuilders to disclose energy efficiency measures to potential buyers. The MLS service which serves the Lawrence area does not include fields for energy-efficient measures.

Last Updated: October 2015

Madison does not have mandatory or voluntary programs to encourage building benchmarking in any sector. The MLS which serves the Madison area does not include fields for energy efficiency features.

Last Updated: October 2013

Commercial and multifamily

Montgomery County has adopted a benchmarking ordinance requiring nonresidential buildings greater than 50,000 square feet to benchmark energy use. The policy covers 44% of nonresidential buildings in the county. Montgomery County has not adopted a benchmarking policy for multifamily buildings.

Single-family

Montgomery County has adopted a time-of-sale energy use disclosure policy for single-family homes.

Last updated: December 2019

Benchmarking is not required for any sector of buildings in Park City. The Park City MLS includes fields for energy-efficient features.

Last Updated: October 2015

Commercial and multifamily

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for commercial and multifamily buildings.

Single-family     

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for single-family home.

Last updated: March 2020