State and Local Policy Database

Required Energy Actions

Albuquerque has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last updated: March 2019

The Commercial Buildings Energy Efficiency Ordinance requires building owners that benchmark and report energy and water data to conduct energy and water audits once every ten years unless the property meets certain efficiency requirements.

Last updated: March 2019

We could not find information on whether the city requires building owners to conduct additional above-code energy actions.

Last updated: March 2019

The City of Austin requires building owners to perform the following energy actions.

Austin’s Energy Conservation Audit and Disclosure Ordinance requires all homes and multifamily buildings (five or more units) that are ten years and older to have an energy audit performed. Home sellers must disclose results to perspective buyers at the time of sale, and owners of multifamily buildings must disclose the energy guide to prospective renters.  

The city requires multifamily properties to reduce energy use by 20% if the property’s energy use intensity exceeds 150% of the average. These properties must also provide a High Energy Use report to current and prospective residents.  

Austin’s above-code green building requirements apply to new private buildings in defined areas of the city, including the central business district. Requirements vary, but all include a level of attainment in LEED or the Austin Energy Green Building Program. The requirements apply to both commercial and residential properties.   

Last updated: May 2019

We could not find information on whether the city requires building owners to conduct additional above-code energy actions.

Last updated: March 2019

All permits for commercial and certain multi-family residential buildings are required to complete a Green Building Statement of Compliance to determine code applicability and identify a green building compliance path. Achieving LEED Silver certification is among the compliance options. 

Last updated: May 2019

We could not find information on whether the city requires building owners to conduct additional above-code energy actions.

Last updated: March 2019

Since 2007, Article 37 of Boston’s municipal zoning code requires that all new commercial and multifamily buildings over 50,000 sq ft. meet the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED certification standards. As part of Article 37 Green Building and Climate Resiliency Guidelines, large commercial developers are asked to detail how they plan to prepare for climate change and how their buildings will work towards the city’s goal of carbon neutrality by 2050. The city uses a checklist to discuss these points with developers and encourage increased levels of efficiency and renewable generation on-site. 

The city's Building Energy Reporting and Disclosure Ordinance (BERDO) includes an Energy Action and Assessment requirement.  Large residential and commercial buildings covered have three main compliance pathways: reduce their emissions or energy usage by 15% or more, be certified as a highly efficient building through ENERGY STAR, or else perform an energy audit. Exemptions exist for high-efficiency buildings.

Boston also have on voluntary effort. The Mayor’s Carbon Cup is a voluntary commitment open to the largest building owners and operators in Boston. These owners and operators with 1 million square feet or more in their portfolio can commit to exceeding the Citywide carbon reduction goal by achieving 35% reduction from 2005 levels by 2020.

Last updated: May 2019

Bridgeport has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last updated: March 2019

Buffalo has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions. 

Last updated: March 2019

We could not find information on whether the city requires building owners to conduct additional above-code energy actions. 

Last updated: March 2019

Chicago has the following energy action requirements.

  • The Chicago Benchmarking Energy Ordinance created the Chicago Energy Rating System. The system assigns all buildings over 50,000 square feet an energy performance rating, which will be required to be posted in a prominent location and shared at time of listing the property for sale or lease. It goes into effect in 2019. 

  • The Chicago Sustainable Development Policy requires development projects that are receiving financial assistance or special approvals from the City to include sustainable elements. Developers must select the elements from a sustainable strategies menu. New construction must achieve 100 points and renovations must achieve 25 to 50 points. The policy applies to any commercial or multifamily project that receives city assistance, requires a zoning change, or requires any other special approval (typically most large private development projects). 

The city also have one voluntary program. The Retrofit Chicago Energy Challenge achieved energy savings. As 2017, it enrolled more than 90 buildings that account for 51.3 million square total.  Each participating property commits to reducing their energy consumption by 20% within the first five years after joining, and to tracking their energy and water data with ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager.

Last updated: May 2019

Chula Vista has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last updated: March 2019

Cincinnati has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions.   

Last updated: March 2019

Cleveland has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions. However, residents and developers seeking tax abatement for residential projects must meet the Cleveland Green Building Standards.

Last updated: May 2019

All residential projects in Columbus that are awarded city or federal funds, as well as all home ownership programs, have to be built in accordance with the AWARE Manual (Accessibility, Water Conservation, Air Quality, Resource Conscious, Energy-Efficient). The standards are applicable to new construction and housing rehabilitation.  The target energy efficiency performance is to meet or exceed the ENERGY STAR requirement for the region.

Last updated: May 2019

The city requires building developments achieve a single low-energy usage requirement.

The Dallas Green Ordinance requires projects less than 50,000 square feet to be 15% more efficient than required by the Dallas Energy Conservation Code. The city allows flexible compliance paths for both commercial and residential developments. Commercial projects may demonstrate compliance by adhering to the International Green Construction Code with city amendments or by achieving LEED certification. Residential projects may demonstrate compliance by following the Dallas prescriptive path, ICC 700, LEED for Homes, or Green Built Texas. Projects are verified for compliance through the Third Party Green Building Program.

Last updated: March 2019

The city requires developments over 25,000 square feet to choose one energy action from a menu of option in accordance with the Green Buildings Ordinance.

Developments may choose one action to achieve compliance: incorporate a green space into the building, install solar panels or purchase renewable energy covering 100% of the building’s electricity needs, achieve LEED Silver certification or better, enroll in Energize Denver’s Energy Program, or pay a fee. If a development chooses to enroll in the Energy Program, it must achieve an ENERGY STAR score of 85 or better or improve energy use intensity by 10% if the development is under 50,000 square feet and by 15% if the develop is over 50,000 square feet within five years.

Last updated: March 2019

Detroit has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last updated: March 2019

El Paso has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last updated: March 2019

Fort Worth has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last updated: March 2019

Grand Rapids has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last updated: March 2019

Hartford does not require building developers and owners to perform additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last updates: March 2019

We could not find information on whether the city requires building owners to conduct additional above-code energy actions.

Last updated: March 2019

Honolulu has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last updated: March 2019

Houston does not require building developments perform additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last updated: March 2019

Indianapolis does not require building developments perform additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last updated: March 2019

We could not find information on whether the city requires building owners to conduct additional above-code energy actions.

Last updated: March 2019

All new and gut rehabilition residential buildings that receive city incentives must be designed to meet the standard for ENERGY STAR qualified new homes.

Last updated: May 2019

Knoxville does not require building developments perform additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last updated: March 2019

Las Vegas does not require any additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last updated: March 2019

Long Beach does not require any additional above-code energy-saving actions. 

Last updated: March 2019

Los Angeles requires building developers and/or owners to perform five energy actions.

The Existing Buildings Energy and Water Efficiency Program mandates energy auditing and retrofit requirements for commercial and multifamily buildings. Los Angeles adopted more stringent energy efficiency requirements for commercial and residential buildings that exceed the CalGreen. The city also operates the Gateway to Green program that provides education on energy and water efficiency programs and incentives to building owners and tenants.

Last updated: March 2019

Louisville has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions. 

Last updated: March 2019

We could not find information on whether the city requires building owners to conduct additional above-code energy actions.

Last updated: March 2019

Memphis has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last updated: March 2019

Mesa is prohibited by state law to require energy action requirements. We could not find information on any voluntary programs adminstered by the city that encourage building owners to take energy-saving actions.

Last updated: May 2019

Miami requires building owners to conduct one additional above-code energy-saving action: all commercial and large multifamily buildings in specific zones must achieve at least LEED Silver certification.

Last updated: March 2019

We could not find information on whether the city requires building owners to conduct additional above-code energy actions.

Last updated: March 2019

The city’s 2019 expansion to the Commercial Building Energy Benchmarking and Transparency Ordinance requires an ASHRAE level 1 evaluation or an accepted tune-up/recommissioning within the past 5 years for the lowest-performing buildings. This requirement is only enforced if there is an option available at no cost to the owner.

Owners of select rental properties are required to disclose energy use information to residential tenants at time of application if applications are provided, or post the information in the property if no applications are provided.

Per the time of sale residential energy disclosure requirement, building owners are required to undergo an energy assessment.

Last updated: May 2019

Nashville has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last updated: March 2019

We could not find information on whether the city requires building owners to conduct additional above-code energy actions.

Last updated: March 2019

New Orleans has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last updated: March 2019

New York City requires commercial and multifamily building owners to conduct four above-code energy-saving actions.

Local Law 87 of 2009 mandates that buildings 50,000 gross square feet or larger undergo periodic energy audit and retro-commissioning measures.

NYC Local Law 88 of 2009 requiring lighting retrofits to meet current NYCECC standards, and to install electric sub-meters for each tenant space.

Local Law 33 of 2018 requires building owners subject to the city’s benchmarking ordinance to display an “energy efficiency grade” at each public entrance of the building.

Intro 1253 regulates emissions from buildings larger than 25,000 square on an annual basis and subject those properties to penalties for excessive emissions.

Last updated: May 2019

We could not find information on whether the city requires building owners to conduct additional above-code energy actions.

Last updated: March 2019

The city requires building developers perform one energy action to achieve low-energy use buildings.

Title 18 of the city’s code requires commercial buildings over 25,000 square feet to achieve LEED Silver certification. Title 18 also mandates residential properties achieve Green Building Certification. 

Last updated: March 2019

Oklahoma City has not adopted any policy requiring building owners to conduct energy-saving actions.

Last updated: March 2019

We could not find information on whether the city requires building owners to conduct additional above-code energy actions.

Last updated: March 2019

Starting in May 2020, in accordance with the Building Energy and Water Efficiency Strategy, owners of buildings larger than 50,000 square feet that score under the national ENERGY STAR score of 50 must either perform an energy audit or perform a retro-commission one time every five years. 

Last updated: May 2019

Philadelphia has not adopted any policy requiring building owners to conduct energy-saving actions, but the Clean Energy Vision Action Plan identifies building tune-up requirements as a potential action.  

Last Updated: March 2019

The city is prohibited by state law to require mandatory benchmarking or energy action requirements. The city supports a voluntary program led by the Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) called the Kilowatt-hour Krackdown that has seen hundreds of buildings voluntarily contribute benchmark data. The city is also partnering with APS, Pearl Home Certification, and the National Real Estate association to certify homes in Phoenix and monitor the impact on home sales price. 

Last Update: May 2019

Pittsburgh does not require any additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last Update: March 2019

The city requires building owners to perform the following energy action requirements:

  • Per the Green Building Policy, all new building constructions and major renovations over 50,000 square feet must achieve LEED Gold certification, while all new constructions and major renovations less than 50,000 square feet may achieve LEED Gold certification or Earth Advantage at the Gold level.
  • Per the Home Energy Score Policy, home sellers must complete an energy assessment of their homes prior to listing the property for sale. 

Last Update: May 2019

Providence has not adopted any policy requiring building owners to conduct energy-saving actions.

Last Updated: March 2019

Raleigh has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last Update: March 2019

Reno's Energy and Water Efficiency Program requires building owners to achieve performance targets twice within seven years of their baseline, or pursue other measures, such as an energy audit, LEED certification, or participation in the utility-sponsored energy efficiency program. 

Last Update: May 2019

Richmond does not have the authority to enact energy action requirements. The city does not administer a voluntary program encouraging building owners to take energy-saving actions.

Last Update: May 2019

Riverside has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last Update: March 2019

Rochester has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last Update: March 2019

Sacramento has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last Update: March 2019

St. Paul has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last Update: March 2019

Salt Lake City requires buildings owners perform one energy-saving action. Per the Energy Benchmarking & Transparency Ordinance, residential and commercial buildings that score 49 or below in ENERGY STAR must undergo energy audits.

Last Update: March 2019

San Antonio has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last Update: March 2019

San Diego has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last Update: March 2019

San Francisco requires building owners perform 3 above-code energy actions.

Chapter 20 of the San Francisco Environment Code, the city’s benchmarking ordinance, requires commercial building owners to conduct an energy audit or retrocommissioning every five years.

San Francisco’s Residential Energy Conservation Ordinance requires a minimum set of retrofits at time-of-sale. This applies to residential properties built before 1978.

San Francisco also mandates residential and commercial buildings satisfy low-energy use requirements. New residential buildings must achieve GreenPoint Rated v7.0 certification. The city also requires new multifamily high-rises to achieve LEED Silver or higher certification and new commercial construction to achieve LEED Gold or higher certification.

Last Update: March 2019

San Jose requires two additional above-code energy-saving actions.

The Energy and Water Building Performance Ordinance requires owners of low-performing buildings greater than 20,000 square feet to conduct an energy audit or to perform retrofitting or retrocommissioning of the building.

Council Policy 6-32 requires commercial projects of more than 25,000 square feet but less than 75 feet in height to be LEED Silver certified. Residential developments less than 10 units are required to complete a GreenPoint or LEED Checklist. Residential developments greater than 10 units are required to be GreenPoint Rated at 50 points or be LEED Certified. 

Last Update: May 2019

Seattle requires the following above-code energy-saving action.

The Seattle Tune-Up Policy (Seattle Municipal Code 22.930) requires the owners of nonresidential buildings over 50,000 square feet to perform energy assessments and building tune-ups to optimize energy and water system performance once every five years.

Last Update: March 2019

St. Louis has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct any additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last Update: March 2019

We could not find information on whether the city requires building owners to conduct additional above-code energy actions.

Last Update: March 2019

Tampa has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last Update: March 2019

Tucson is prohibited by state law to require energy action requirements. The city does not administer a voluntary program encouraging building owners to take energy-saving actions.

Last Update: May 2019

We could not find information on whether the city requires building owners to conduct additional above-code energy actions.

Last Update: March 2019

Virginia Beach does not have the authority to enact energy action requirements. The city does not administer a voluntary program encouraging building owners to take energy-saving actions.

Last Update: May 2019

The District currently requires two additional above-code energy-saving actions.

The Clean Energy DC Omnibus Act of 2018 requires the implementation of a building energy performance standard (BEPS) starting with privately-owned buildings 50,000 square feet and larger and District-owned or District instrumentality-owned buildings 10,000 square feet and larger in 2021. Privately-owned buildings 25,000 square feet and larger will be covered in 2023, and buildings 10,000 square feet and larger will be covered in 2026. Buildings will demonstrate that they exceed the local median ENERGY STAR score for their building type, or will be required to follow either a performance or prescriptive pathway to achieve compliance.

 The Green Construction Code applies to all commercial projects 10,000 square feet and larger, and all residential projects 4 stories and higher and 10,000 square feet or larger. The Green Building Act requires that a commercial building over 50,000 square feet must achieve LEED at the Certified level. If a commercial or residential building has received at least 15% of its funding from public sources (broadly defined to include ground leases, TIF districts, etc.) they must achieve Green Communities Certification (residential), LEED at the Silver level (nonresidential), or LEED at the Gold level (Schools).

Last update: May 2019

Worcester has not adopted a policy requiring building owners to conduct additional above-code energy-saving actions.

Last Updated: March 2019