State and Local Policy Database

Community-Wide Energy Efficiency Goals

Community-wide energy efficiency targets allow for the coordination of several programs under a unifying policy. Targets provide a basis for development of long-term sustainability programs and can help mobilize funding for efficiency programs. Targets with specific time lines allow cities to establish regular monitoring regimes. The development of a community-wide target is often the result of long-term planning and outreach across the community.

This sub-category includes information on four topics: Community-wide and/or neighborhood-specific energy efficiency-related targets; formal adoption of targets; integration of targets into city’s general plan or other mainstreaming of the targets across community activities; and proven progress towards achieving their long term goals.

Arlington County’s Community Energy Plan sets a community-wide goal for the county to reduce per capita greenhouse gas emissions to 3.0 mtCO2e/capita/year by 2050.  Additionally, Arlington County has an energy-efficiency goal that aims for residential buildings to use 55% less energy and non-residential buildings to use 60% less energy as compared to 2007 levels.

Reporting

Data regarding the energy intensity and carbon footprint of community buildings can be consulted in Arlington County's open data portal

Last updated: May 2017

 

 

The Atlanta Climate Action Plan contains goals to reduce community-wide greenhouse gas emissions and energy consumption in both residential and commercial buildings. The plan’s climate goals include reducing greenhouse gas emissions 20% below a 2009 baseline by 2020 and 40% below a 2009 baseline by 2030. The plan also calls for a 20% reduction in energy consumption below 2009 levels by 2020 and a 40% reduction below 2009 levels by 2030. The city council formally adopted the climate plan with Resolution 15-R-4042.

The city releases annual greenhouse gas emissions inventories to provide the public with updates on progress made towards achieving the city’s goals. The most recent greenhouse gas emissions inventory indicates the city is on track to achieve its near-term climate goal.

Last updated: April 2017

The City Council formally adopted the 2015 Austin Community Climate Plan (ACCP) to establish a citywide net zero greenhouse gas emissions goal by 2050 including interim targets of a 25% emissions reduction by 2020, a 49% reduction by 2030, and a 70% reduction by 2040. The plan uses a 2010 emissions baseline and allows for up to 10% of carbon offsets for all targets.

The City of Austin’s 2007 Climate Protection Resolution includes a goal to reduce 20% of greenhouse gas emissions from the city's electric utility from 2005 levels by 2020.

The Office of Sustainability releases greenhouse gas emissions data on its website in annual progress reports and triannual inventories. Austin Energy releases an annual Consumer Electric Services report to report on energy savings progress. The city is currently on track to achieve its greenhouse gas emissions goal.

Last updated: April 2017

Baltimore has formally adopted community-wide energy and climate goals as part of its Climate Action Plan. The city has a goal to reduce community-wide energy use 13% below a 2010 baseline by 2020. The city’s climate goal is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 15% below a 2010 baseline by 2020.

Baltimore has been releasing annual progress reports to provide the public with updates on efforts made to achieve the city’s goals. The city is in the process of conducting a community-wide greenhouse gas emissions inventory that will be released in early 2017. This inventory will provide an update on whether the city is on track to achieve its quantitative goals.

Last updated: January 2017

We did not find information that Birmingham has developed, implemented, or reported on community-wide energy efficiency goals.

Last updated: January 2017

Boston’s initial climate goals were formally adopted in 2007 with Executive Order 3-3890 and the Greenovate Boston 2014 Climate Action Plan Update provided the most recent update to these goals. Boston’s goals are to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 25% below 2005 levels by 2020 and 80% below 2005 levels by 2050. Boston also has a goal of reducing energy consumption in commercial and industrial buildings by 7%.

Boston reports progress towards greenhouse gas reductions in the Carbon Disclosure Project’s 2016 Citywide Emissions Database. The city has reduced its community-wide greenhouse gas emissions by 19% between 2007 and 2014. The city is currently on track to meet its goal for 2020.

Last updated: April 2017

Boulder's Climate Commitment draft report contains a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 80% by 2050.   We did not collect information on the extent of stakeholder involvement in the setting of the 2050 goal.

Last updated: October 2015

The Burlington Climate Action Plan set a target to bring greenhouse gas emissions down to 2010 levels by 2016 and reduce community greenhouse gas emissions 10% below 2010 levels by 2025.  The Burlington Climate Action Plan and some its actions items are incorporated into the 2011 Municipal Development Plan that was been referred to the City Council for adoption.  We did not collect information on the extent of stakeholder involvement in the setting of goals.

Last updated: October 2015

Carrboro’s Board of Aldermen adopted Resolution 78/2009-10 to reduce the town’s greenhouse gas emissions to a 350 parts per million in the atmosphere, but the goal has not been quantified in terms of energy efficiency, consumption, or intensity. Carrboro also participated in the Orange County Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory which identified three potential tiers of greenhouse gas emissions reductions.  The town is actively forming a task force to support a community plan and planning a community forum later in 2014.

Last updated: April 2014

The city does not currently have community-wide energy efficiency goals.

Charlotte does release annual sustainability updates that report on their community-wide efficiency-related initiatives. The city’s Quality of Life Dashboard details metrics related to community-wide energy efficiency, such as residential electricity consumption.

Last updated: January 2017 

Charlottesville’s 2012 Emissions Report Update identified goals to prevent increases in community-wide greenhouse gas emissions in the near-term and reduce community-wide emissions 10% under 2000 levels by 2035.  The goal was formally codified when the Emissions Report Update was adopted into the 2013 Comprehensive Plan by reference.  We did not collect information on the extent of stakeholder involvement in the development of goals.

Last updated: October 2015

Chicago’s Climate Action Plan set greenhouse gas goals to reduce emissions 25% below 1990 levels by 2025 and 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. Chicago’s Sustainable Chicago Action Agenda has an efficiency target to improve citywide energy efficiency by 5% by 2015. The city has not adopted its efficiency target by executive order or city resolution. The Green Ribbon Committee, which is a group of leaders from the non-profit and business communities appointed by Mayor Emanuel, advises the city on sustainability broadly, with an emphasis on energy efficiency.

The City has provided annual reports on progress towards the goals in the Sustainable Chicago Action Agenda. These reports are published online, and are published annually in December. The last report was published in December 2015. Per the most recently available data, Chicago is currently on track to achieve a reduction within 25% of its 2025 greenhouse gas emissions goal.

Last updated: April 2017

The Green Cincinnati Plan of 2013 includes a goal to reduce community-wide greenhouse gas reductions by 2% annually between 2013 and 2020. The plan was formally adopted by the Cincinnati City Council in June 2013. More than 200 members of Green Umbrella Action Teams and other stakeholders took part in a strategic planning process to provide input on the plan.

The city tracks and reports progress toward its goals to city council on an annual basis. It is in the process of providing the public with access to various sustainability indicators through its open data portal. The city is currently not on track to meet its greenhouse gas emissions goal.

Last updated: January 2017

The Cleveland Climate Action Plan identifies goals to reduce community-wide greenhouse gas emissions 16% below 2010 levels by 2020, 40% below 2010 levels by 2030, and 80% below 2010 levels by 2050. The plan also identified goals to reduce residential and commercial energy use 50% and industrial energy use 30% under 2010 levels. We did not locate an executive order or city council resolution that formally adopted these goals.

The city does release regular progress updates that track progress on implementation goals to support the climate action plan. The city has not updated its community-wide greenhouse gas or energy inventories, and thus we are unable to determine if the city is on track to achieve its goals.

Last updated: January 2017

The city’s Green Memo III establishes community-wide energy and greenhouse gas emissions goals. The city has a community-wide goal to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions 20% below a 2013 baseline by 2020. These goals have been formally adopted by the Columbus City Council.

The city releases annual progress reports that track progress toward these goals, and it is currently on track to achieve its 2020 target.

Last updated: April 2017

The city’s most recent update to its Sustainability Plan lays out a process for establishing greenhouse gas emissions goals for individual community sectors but not for the entire community. We were unable to locate information that the plan has been formally adopted through either a city council resolution or mayoral executive order. The city does support a downtown 2030 District.

The city does report greenhouse gas emissions in periodic progress reports and through the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP).

Last updated: April 2017

Denver has formally adopted its 2020 Sustainability Goals that aim to hold total energy consumed in Denver for buildings, mobility and industrial processes below the total consumed in 2012, while decreasing fossil fuel consumption by 50%. In addition, Denver adopted the goal of reducing energy consumption of commercial and multifamily buildings 10% by 2020 and 20% in the decade following when the Energize Denver initiative was announced.

Denver adopted a 2020 Sustainability Goal to reduce Denver’s greenhouse gas emissions below 1990 levels. Denver’s long-term climate goal is articulated in its 2015 Climate Action Plan, which is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 80% by 2050 from a 2005 baseline.

The Denver Office of Sustainability is required to report on progress toward the 2020 Sustainability goals on its website. The city is not on track to achieve its community-wide energy goal; however, the city is projected to achieve greenhouse gas emissions reductions within 25% of its near-term 2020 goal.

Last updated: April 2017

Detroit has not identified a community-wide energy efficiency-related reduction target.

Last updated: January 2017

In 2011, the Dubuque City Council adopted a goal to reduce community-wide greenhouse gas emissions 50% below 2003 levels by 2030.  The Dubuque Community Greenhouse Gas Reduction Task Force, comprised of nonprofit organizations, faith based organizations, and businesses, brought the goal to the city council for adoption. 

Last updated: October 2013

El Paso has not identified a community-wide energy efficiency-related target.

Last updated: January 2017

Fort Worth does not have energy efficiency-related goals for its entire community. The city did enter into a Better Buildings Challenge Community Partner Agreement to reduce energy intensity 20% by 2020 in 5,700,000 square feet of building space.

While the city regularly publishes progress reports on energy efficiency in municipal operations, there is no such report for community-wide energy efficiency.  

Last updated: January 2017

The city does not currently have community-wide energy efficiency goals.

Last updated: January 2017 

Houston’s Mayor Parker committed the city to an 80% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions below 2005 levels by 2050 at the Mayors' National Climate Action Agenda. Houston is a Better Buildings Challenge partner and has committed to a 20% energy use reduction by 2020 for 30 million square feet of building space in Houston. The city is in the process of developing a formal sustainability action plan, but we were unable to find evidence that this goal has been formally adopted through either a city council resolution or mayoral executive order.

Houston does not release regular reports on progress toward energy efficiency goals.

Last updated: January 2017

Indianapolis has not developed or implemented community-wide energy efficiency-related goals.

Last updated: January 2017

The city does not currently have community-wide energy efficiency goals.

Last updated: January 2017

The Climate Protection Plan includes a goal to reduce community-wide greenhouse gas emissions 30% below 2000 levels by 2020 and 80% below 2000 levels by 2050. The plan also calls for a 50% reduction in energy use by 2050. The city council formally adopted the plan and its goals in 2008 through Resolution 080754. Kansas City engaged the Climate Protection Steering Committee, made up of community stakeholders, during the development of the plan.

The city reports on greenhouse gas emissions with periodic inventories. The most recent data indicates the city is on track to be within 25% of its near-term greenhouse gas emissions goal by 2020.

Last updated: April 2017

Knoxville’s Energy and Sustainability Work Plan sets a goal to reduce community-wide greenhouse gas emissions 20% below 2005 levels by 2020 although we cannot confirm the goal was adopted.  We did not collect information on the extent of stakeholder involvement in the setting of the goal.

Last updated: October 2015

Las Vegas has not identified or implemented a community-wide energy efficiency target.

Last updated: January 2017

Lawrence’s Climate Protection Plan set targets to reduce community-wide greenhouse gas emissions 30% below 2005 levels by 2020, 50% below 2005 levels by 2030, 70% below 2005 levels by 2040, and 80% below 2005 levels by 2050, but the City Council did not formally adopt these goals. We did not collect information on the extent of stakeholder involvement in the setting of goals.

Last updated: October 2013

Los Angeles’s Sustainable City pLAn was formally adopted by Executive Directive 7 in April 2015 and includes community-wide greenhouse gas emission reduction and energy efficiency goals.

The plan calls for the city to reduce community-wide greenhouse gas emissions 45% below a 1990 baseline by 2025, 60% below a 1990 baseline by 2035, and 80% below a 1990 baseline by 2050. The plan also calls for improving the greenhouse gas efficiency of the city’s economy from 2009 levels 55% by 2025 and 75% by 2035.

The plan includes a goal to reduce energy use per square foot for all building types by at least 14% below a 2013 baseline by 2025 and 30% below a 2013 baseline by 2035. The plan includes a target to use energy efficiency to deliver 15% of all of the city’s projected electricity needs through rebates, incentives, and education by 2020.

Los Angeles is required to publish an annual public report on progress towards its goals. Since the Sustainable City pLAn was released in 2015, the city has since published the first annual report in 2016. Relevant data is also publicly available on the city’s Sustainability Dashboard. The city is currently on track to achieve its 2025 greenhouse gas emissions goal.

Last updated: April 2017

Mayor Greg Fischer signed the Compact of Mayors (COM) in April 2016. A community-wide greenhouse gas emissions reduction goal has not been set, but will be set as required through the COM.

In the Sustain Louisville plan, the Louisville Metro Government set a goal to decrease community-wide per capita energy use 25% below 2012 levels by 2025. Mayor Fischer has formally adopted this goal.

The city releases regular reports that track the city’s progress toward its goals. Sustain Louisville’s 2015 Progress Report indicates that the city is not on track to achieve its energy reduction goals.

Last updated: April 2017

The Madison Sustainability Plan was adopted by the Madison Common Council in May 2012 by City Resolution 21481.  It sets goals to both reduce Madison’s community-wide carbon emissions by 80% by 2050 and actively involve 20% of Madison residents in energy efficiency and climate change programs by 2030.  We did not collect information on the extent of stakeholder involvement in the setting of goals.

Last updated: October 2013

In 2015, the city committed to the Compact of Mayors and is currently completing an inventory of community-wide greenhouse gas emissions. As part of complying with this commitment, the city will set reduction targets for greenhouse gas emissions and complete a climate action plan by 2018.

A community driven goal of creating 800 MW of renewable energy and energy savings through energy efficiency by 2020 was endorsed by some in Memphis and Shelby County, but the city has not yet identified or implemented a community-wide energy efficiency-related target.

The joint Memphis-Shelby County Office of Sustainability releases annual reports on progress towards broadly defined energy and climate goals in the Sustainable Shelby Plan.

Last updated: January 2017

The Miami City Commission formally adopted MiPlan, Miami’s Climate Action Plan, by Resolution 08-01096 in September 2008. MiPlan set a goal to reduce community-wide greenhouse gas emissions 25% below 2006 levels by 2020. Miami worked with the Miami Green Commission, comprised of community stakeholders, to create the Climate Action Plan.

The City of Miami was also an active participant in the planning process for Miami-Dade County’s Greenprint plan. The plan called for 20% reduction in non-renewable energy use by 2015 below a 2007 baseline. While the county has encouraged individual cities to formally adopt the plan as their own, we have found no information indicating that Miami has done so.

We did not find that Miami regularly reported on progress toward achieving its community-wide climate goal.

Last updated: January 2017

Common Council Resolution 131035 adopted Milwaukee’s sustainability plan, ReFresh Milwaukee. Dovetailing with its Better Buildings goal, Milwaukee recruits businesses in downtown Milwaukee to cut their energy use 20% by 2020. The city does release ReFresh Milwaukee Annual Progress Reports which track the city’s progress towards its broadly defined sustainability goals.

Last updated: April 2017

Minneapolis has set goals to reduce community-wide greenhouse gas emissions by 30% under 2006 levels by 2025 and 80% under 2006 levels by 2050. The city has also adopted goals to increase energy efficiency by 15% in residential buildings and 20% in commercial and industrial buildings relative to a projected 2025 growth baseline. These goals have been formally adopted as part of the city’s Climate Action Plan.

The city regularly releases updates on progress towards its climate goals in periodic greenhouse gas inventories. Per data presented in the 2014 Greenhouse Gas Inventory, the city reduced its community-wide greenhouse gas emissions by 17% between 2006 and 2014. The city is currently on track to achieve its 2025 goal.

Last updated: April 2017

The Livable Nashville Committee will be setting energy efficiency-related goals based on a greenhouse gas emissions community and municipal inventory that is currently being completed.

Last updated: January 2017

The New Orleans City Council, which regulates the city's utility services, formally adopted an energy savings goal as part of Resolution R-15-599 for Entergy New Orleans, the utility serving the city, to ramp up energy savings annually by .2% to achieve 2% annual energy savings. The city is currently on track to achieve this goal.

New Orleans has made committed to the Compact of Mayors and aims to complete a climate action plan with climate goals by 2018. Commitments to complete a climate action plan are also included in the city's Resilient New Orleans Strategy and the city’s Plan for the 21st Century. The city completed a greenhouse gas inventory in 2016 and is finalizing its climate action strategy for launch in 2017 with reduction goals for 2030.

Last updated: April 2017

One City: Built to Last includes a greenhouse gas emissions target for all private sector buildings to reduce emissions by 30% from a 2005 baseline by 2025. This goal contributes toward a larger, citywide emissions target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from a 2005 baseline by 2050 (80 x 50) which was formally adopted as Local Law 66 of 2014. The city does not have a community-wide energy goal.

New York City releases annual greenhouse gas inventories, which track both the citywide 80 x 50 goal and the public buildings goal of 35% reduction by 2025. The city is not currently on track for its 2050 community-wide greenhouse gas emissions goal.

Last updated: April 2017

Oakland has established community-wide goals for greenhouse gas emissions through its Energy and Climate Action Plan (ECAP). The city has adopted a goal to achieve a reduction in GHG emissions of 36% by 2020 and 83% by 2050 (with a 2005 baseline). This goal is will partly be achieved through an energy use reduction target of 32%. 

The city annually reports progress towards these goals through the Sustainable Oakland Report. The city is not currently on track to meet its 2020 goal. 

Updated: April 2017

The city is currently developing a sustainability plan and the Oklahoma City Office of Sustainability has engaged a group of stakeholders to discuss topics related to energy, water, natural assets, transportation, and preparedness/resilience. An efficiency goal is expected to be included in the sustainability plan when adopted in the spring or summer of 2017.

Last updated: January 2017

The Green Works Orlando Community Action Plan details the city’s goals to reduce community-wide greenhouse gas emissions by 25% below 2007 levels by 2018 and 90% below 2007 levels by 2040. The plan also has goals to reduce energy use by 5% below 2010 levels by 2018 and 25% below 2010 levels by 2040. The mayor and city council formally adopted the Green Works Plan in August 2013.

Orlando has not yet completed a greenhouse gas emissions inventory or released an update on the city’s progress toward its goals. We were unable to determine if the city is on track to meet either its climate or energy goals.

Last updated: January 2017

Park City’s Community Carbon Roadmap sets a goal to reduce community greenhouse gas emissions 15% below 2005 levels by 2020.  In addition to the greenhouse gas goal, the City Council adopted several broad goals for energy conservation and efficiency.  We did not collect information on the extent of stakeholder involvement in the setting of goals.

Last updated: October 2015

Philadelphia’s 2016 Greenworks plan has established a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 80% below a 2006 baseline by 2050. Mayor Kenney formally committed the city to this goal in the Kenney Transition Report. The city is in the process of developing an energy master plan with data-driven community energy targets. These targets are expected in the spring of 2017.

Philadelphia reports on energy and climate goals annually in Greenworks progress reports. The city is on track to meet its adopted greenhouse gas emissions goal by 2050.

Last updated: April 2017

Phoenix’s formally adopted 2050 Environmental Sustainability Goals include both energy and climate goals. The city has adopted a goal of carbon neutrality by 2060 (and at least an 80% to 90% reduction in community greenhouse gas emission by 2050). The city also adopted a goal to have all new buildings be net positive in terms of energy and materials by 2050.

The city recently completed a community greenhouse gas inventory and releases updates on progress toward energy and climate goals in annual SustainPHX reports. The Phoenix City Council recently requested staff to prepare a 2025 greenhouse gas emissions goal and action plan to be released in late 2017.  

Last updated: April 2017

Pittsburgh has formally adopted community-wide greenhouse gas emissions goals in the city’s Climate Action Plan Version 2.0. It set a goal to reduce community-wide greenhouse gas emissions 20% below 2003 levels by 2023. The city supports a 2030 District and will also be including an energy reduction goal in its update to the climate action plan. Pittsburgh has engaged with nonprofit organizations, the business community, and institutional organizations in setting these goals.

The city reports annually on progress towards energy efficiency goals in its State of Sustainability report. The city also produces greenhouse gas emissions inventories every five years. Per recently published data, Pittsburgh is on track to achieve its greenhouse gas emissions goal.

Last updated: April 2017 

The 2009 Portland and Multnomah County Climate Action Plan was formally adopted by Resolution No. 36748. The plan sets a goal of reducing Portland’s community-wide greenhouse gas emissions 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. The plan also includes a goal to reduce total building energy use across the city 25% by 2030.

The city’s 2009 climate action plan was recently updated in 2015. Portland will release regular progress reports tracking progress made toward the goals in this plan update. The city is not currently on track to surpass its 2050 greenhouse gas emissions goal.

Last updated: April 2017 

Providence has adopted a goal to become a carbon-neutral city by 2050. This goal is outlined in Executive Order 2016-3. This is in line with the statewide Resilient Rhode Island Act of 2014, which calls for an 85% reduction in emissions by 2050. The city does not have a community-wide energy goal.

The city will be reporting its community-wide progress on climate change mitigation and adaptation to the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) for the Compact of Mayors.

Last updated: January 2017 

Raleigh has not yet adopted community-wide energy efficiency-related goals. Raleigh’s comprehensive plan Planning Raleigh 2030 includes a Community Inventory Report that commits the city to conducting a greenhouse gas inventory and setting community-wide goals.

Last updated: January 2017

In the 2014 RVAgreen Annual Progress Report, Mayor Dwight C. Jones established a goal to reduce community-wide greenhouse gas emissions by 80% below a 2008 baseline by 2050. We could not find information that this goal has been formally adopted by either the city council or through an executive order. The city does not have a community-wide energy goal.

Richmond regularly reports on its greenhouse gas emissions through RVAgeen Annual Progress Reports. The city is not on track to achieve the 2050 greenhouse gas emissions goal set by Mayor Jones.

Last updated: April 2017

The City of Riverside Public Utilities Department has adopted energy efficiency goals for residential, commercial, and industrial properties. In the 2012 Green Action Plan, Riverside Public Utilities formally adopted a goal to save 1% of community load annually based on a 2004 baseline and reduce the city’s peak electrical load demand by 10% overall. Riverside engaged with the Green Accountability Performance Committee to develop these goals.

The City adopted the Riverside Restorative Growthprint – Economic Prosperity Action Plan/Climate Action Plan (RRG-EPAP/CAP) by City Council Resolution 22942 on January 5, 2016. The RRG established citywide goals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 26.4% for 2020 and 49% by 2035.

Riverside Public Utilities reports energy savings annually to the California Energy Commission (CEC) through its SB 1037 report. Riverside is on track to achieve its energy savings goal.

Last updated: April 2017

The city’s formally adopted 2035 General Plan includes a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 15% below a 2005 baseline by 2020, 49% by 2035 and 83% by 2050. The city’s plan also includes a goal to reduce residential and commercial energy use by 25% below a 2005 baseline by 2030.

We did not find regular public reports that track progress towards these goals.

Last updated: January 2017

While the city has not adopted community-wide energy goals, the city has formally adopted a community-wide goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 50% below a 2009 baseline by 2030 and 80% below a 2009 baseline by 2040.

The city’s SLCgreen dashboard is updated annually with progress reports for all sustainability goals. This includes tracking progress towards the community-wide greenhouse gas emissions reduction goal. Because the greenhouse gas emissions goal was set in 2016, the city has yet to release its first annual update. We are thus unable to determine if the city is on track to achieve its goals.

Last updated: January 2017

While the city has inventoried their greenhouse gas emissions as part of the SA 2020 planning process, the city has yet to establish a greenhouse gas emissions goal.

SA Tomorrow, the city's formally adopted sustainability plan, established a goal to reduce energy use for all buildings within the city from 116 kBTU per square foot in 2014 to 90 kBTU per square foot in 2040.

The city’s municipal utility is required by the city government to provide quarterly and annual energy savings reports. We are not able to determine if the city is on track to meet its community-wide energy efficiency goal.

Last updated: April 2017

San Diego formally adopted the Climate Action Plan (CAP) in December 2015. The CAP sets a target to achieve a 15% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions below a 2010 baseline by 2020, reduce emissions 40% below a 2010 baseline by 2030, and 50% below a 2010 baseline by 2035.

The CAP had a goal to adopt a residential Energy Conservation and Disclosure Ordinance and to reduce energy use by 15% per housing unit in 20% of residential housing units by 2020 and 50% of units by 2035. This would reduce 3,218 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent by 2020 and 5,605 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent by 2035.

The city is starting to produce annual public updates and reports on progress towards its goals. The first Annual Report of the Climate Action Plan includes specific actions, proposed outcomes, and a timeline with milestones that track success in meeting 2020 and 2035 goals. The city also completes an annual greenhouse gas inventory as part of the annual report. This is verified through a neutral third-party to ensure it is accurate and complete. According to data from the city’s most recent greenhouse gas inventory, the city is on track to meet its greenhouse gas emissions goal.

Last updated: April 2017

City Ordinance 81-08 calls for a 25% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions below 1990 levels by 2017, 40% reduction by 2025, and 80% reduction by 2050.

San Francisco's Climate Action Strategy has set a goal of implementing energy-efficient policies for both residential and commercial buildings that will result in a decrease of 301,979 metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent by 2030.

SF Environment annually reports progress on greenhouse gas emission reductions to both their website and the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP). The city has been on track to be within 25% of its 2017 greenhouse gas emissions goal.

Last updated: April 2017

The San Jose Green Vision, a 15-year plan formally adopted as part of the 2011 Envision San Jose 2040 General Plan, calls for reducing community-wide energy consumption 50% below 2008 levels by 2022. The city's Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategy includes a goal to effectively reduce community-wide greenhouse gas emissions 14% below a 2008 baseline by 2035 through meeting a greenhouse gas efficiency threshold.

San Jose reports on progress annually in Green Vision Annual Reports. Recent data indicates the city is on track to achieve its 2035 greenhouse gas emissions goal.

Last updated: April 2017

Seattle formally adopted the Seattle Climate Action Plan in 2013. The plan calls for Seattle to reach zero net greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and targets an 82% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from buildings by the year 2050 (relative to a 2008 baseline). The plan further delineates that these emissions reductions should come from a 45% reduction in commercial energy use and a 63% reduction in residential energy use over that same time.

The city provides regular updates on progress towards its climate goals in greenhouse gas emissions inventories. The city is not currently on track for its community-wide 2050 greenhouse gas emissions goal.

Last updated: April 2017

St. Louis’s Sustainability Action Agenda sets specific goals to reduce community-wide greenhouse gas emissions 25% below 2005 levels by 2020 and 80% below 2005 levels by 2050. The city has not established community-wide energy goals. The Sustainability Action Agenda is an update required by the formally adopted St. Louis Sustainability Plan.

Per data released by the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) in 2016, the city is not currently on track to meet its 2020 greenhouse gas emissions target.

Last updated: January 2017

The city’s Green Resolution formally adopted a goal proposed by Mayor Pam Iorio to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2025. Mayor Iorio originally proposed the goal in signing the U.S. Mayor’s Climate Protection Agreement. The city has also established a goal to reduce community-wide energy use in the city by 38.6% below business as usual projections for the year 2025 as part of its Energy Efficiency and Conservation Plan. We could not confirm that the specific energy goal has been formally adopted by either executive order or city council resolution.

The city releases Annual Sustainability Reports to track greenhouse gas emissions for city assets, but these reports do not contain an updated community-wide total. We are thus unable to determine if the city is on track to meet its targets.

Last updated: January 2017

The city’s comprehensive plan It’s Our Future: A Choice City 2016 calls for a 10% reduction in community-wide energy use. The city has not released reports that track progress toward this goal.

Last updated: January 2017

Several energy-related goals are included in the district's sustainability plan, Sustainable DC. These goals include reducing citywide energy use by 50% and reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 50% by 2032. Mayor’s Order 2013-209 formally adopted these goals.

The city releases annual public reports that provide updates on the progress made towards achieving the city’s goals. The city is currently on track to achieve its greenhouse gas emissions goal.

Last updated: April 2017