State and Local Policy Database

Local Government Energy Efficiency Goals

Energy efficiency targets for local government operations help to coordinate and focus efficiency efforts and streamline investments across departments. Setting and codifying a clear commitment helps provide a point of reference against which a city can measure its progress.

This sub-category includes information on the following topics:

  • Established energy efficiency-related goals for local government operations (including reductions in GHGs, energy intensity)
  • Codification, executive action, or other formal adoption of the goal
  • Stakeholder involvement in developing goals and related strategies.
  • Progress toward goals, whether the government is on track to meet its goals.

Arlington’s Community Energy Plan calls for a reduction in county government greenhouse gas emissions of 10% below 2000 levels by 2012 and 76% below 2007 levels by 2050.  The Arlington County Board adopted Arlington’s greenhouse gas reductions targets in June of 2013 and incorporated them into the County’s Comprehensive Plan.  We did not collect information on the extent to which formal agency stakeholder groups were involved in setting the goal.

Last updated: October 2015

Atlanta identified a goal to reduce emissions from existing municipal operations by 20% by 2020, 40% by 2030, and 80% by 2050 – from 2009 levels – in its 2015 Climate Action Plan, housed under its citywide sustainability initiative called Power to Change. Each target was vetted through local subject matter experts and discussed with stakeholders in the community. P2catl is an initiative created by the Atlanta Mayor’s Office of Sustainability in collaboration with over 300 stakeholders across Atlanta representing neighborhoods, schools, business, community organizations, and government agencies.

Stringency

In order to meet its local government greenhouse gas goal, Atlanta would need to reduce emissions by an average of 1.8% per year.

Progress

We did not find quantitative data indicating Atlanta was on track to achieve its nearest-term local government energy use goal.

Reporting

The City of Atlanta annually reports municipal energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Their most recent report was the 2014 Municipal Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory.

Last updated: January 2017

The Austin City Council passed Resolution No. 20070215-023 in 2007 to formally adopt a goal to make the city operations carbon-neutral by 2020. Austin requires all departments to develop and implement climate action plans. All departments have performance measures related to their departmental carbon footprint. In accordance the City of Austin Administrative Bulletin 05-01, all city departments and agencies must develop Departmental Energy Efficiency Plans.

Stringency

In order to meet its local government greenhouse gas goal, Austin would need to reduce emissions by 7.7% per year.

Progress

Austin is not currently on track for its local government greenhouse gas goal. 

Reporting

Austin publicizes actions it takes on internal initiatives on its Sustainability Dashboard and on an Open Data platform, including emissions and energy data. Austin also annually reports its greenhouse gas emissions to the Climate Registry, an independent verification entity. 

Last updated: January 2017

The city's adopted Strategic Management Energy Plan has a goal to reduce city government energy consumption by 30% by 2022 from a 2006 baseline. It also has a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from government operations, facilities, and fleet 15% by 2020 from a 2007 baseline. In November 2014, the Baltimore Energy Office together with Sustainability Commission adopted these goals. The Sustainability Commission was given the authority to identify these goals in accordance with City Code, Article 5, 34-7. According to data in Baltimore's 2013 Annual Sustainability Report, the local government's combined electricity and natural gas use increased by 3% between 2009 and 2012.

Stringency

In order to meet its local government energy goal, Baltimore would need to reduce energy use by an average of 1.9% per year.

Progress

Baltimore is not currently on track for its local government energy use goal.

Reporting

Baltimore publishes annual sustainability reports on its progress toward energy­-related initiatives and the Office of Sustainable Energy’s new Strategic Energy Plan requires annual updates on progress. 

Last updated: January 2017

We did not find information regarding an energy efficiency-related goal for Birmingham’s local government operations.

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

We did not find information detailing the frequency of public reporting on Birmingham’s energy efficiency activities.

Last updated: January 2017

In 2007, then-Mayor Menino set the goal of reducing municipal greenhouse gas emissions 7% by 2012 and 80% by 2050 compared to 1990. The 2014 Climate Action Plan Update expanded upon these goals to include a goal to reduce municipal and communitywide greenhouse gas emissions 25% below 2005 levels by 2020. The Boston Transportation Mobility Plan includes climate change as a major design parameter for the planning process, and the Department of Neighborhood Development is developing a new housing plan for Boston, which will include broad sustainability principles. According to data in Boston’s municipal greenhouse gas inventory, the city reduced its greenhouse gas emissions by 27% between 2005 and 2013.

Stringency

In order to meet its local government energy goal, Boston would have needed to greenhouse gas emissions by an average of 1.7% per year.

Progress

Boston has achieved its local government greenhouse gas goal for 2020.

Reporting

Boston releases an annual report on its progress toward reducing municipal greenhouse gas emissions and related initiatives on the Climate Action website. The city reports annual emissions figures in the City of Boston Municipal and Community Greenhouse Gas Inventory

Last updated: January 2017

Boulder's Climate Commitment draft report contains a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 80% by 2050. We did not collect information on the extent of stakeholder involvement in the setting of the 2050 goal. 

Last updated: October 2015

The Climate Action Plan calls on Burlington to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from government operations to 2010 levels by 2016 and reduce emissions 20% below 2010 levels by 2025.  We do not know if these greenhouse gas emissions targets were formally adopted by the city council.  We did not collect information on the extent to which formal agency stakeholder groups were involved in setting the goals.

Last updated: October 2015

Carrboro’s Board of Aldermen adopted Resolution 78/2009-10 articulating a vision to reduce the community’s greenhouse gas emissions by the proportional amount required to keep carbon dioxide levels under 350 parts per million in the atmosphere.  The town has not formally adopted a government operations goal to this end, but it is actively studying a 2% to 7% annual greenhouse gas emissions reduction goal with stakeholders.  

Last updated: April 2014

The City of Charlotte includes general lead-by-example goals for energy efficiency in its strategic plan and is in the process of finalizing a goal of using 15% less electricity compared to city government facilities across the southeast United States.

Stringency

We are unable to determine the stringency of Charlotte’s local government energy savings goal because it is still under development.

Progress

We did not find quantitative data indicating Charlotte was on track to achieve its local government energy use goal.

Reporting

Charlotte does not produce regular reports detailing progress on energy efficiency-related activities. The city has a Quality of Life Dashboard reporting on various performance indicators, including citywide electricity and natural gas consumption, but the dashboard does not report local government energy or climate indicators.

Last updated: March 2017

Charlottesville’s 2012 Emissions Report Update identified a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from local government operations by 1% annually.  The goal was formally codified when the Emissions Report Update was adopted into the 2013 Comprehensive Plan by reference.  Charlottesville also has an energy reduction goal for local government operations, but we could not confirm the details of the goal.  We did not collect information on the extent to which formal agency stakeholder groups were involved in setting the goal. 

Last updated: October 2015

In 2008, Chicago established the Sustainable Chicago 2015 Action Plan, which included a goal to improve overall energy efficiency of municipal buildings 10% by 2015, along with a goal to improve citywide energy efficiency by 5% by the end of 2015. Together, these goals addressed all local government operations. The city has not adopted its targets by executive order or city resolution, but Sustainable Chicago 2015 is understood to be the Mayor’s sustainability vision by city departments and the community overall. The city will continue working towards this energy savings target until the next Sustainable Chicago plan is released, likely in 2017. Through the Chicago Climate Action Plan, the city also adopted a greenhouse gas emission reduction goal of 25% by 2020 and 80% by 2050, from 1990 levels. While this goal is citywide, it includes government operations.

Stringency

In order to meet its local government greenhouse gas emissions goal, Chicago would have needed to reduce emissions by an average of 2% per year.

Progress

We did not find quantitative data indicating Chicago was on track to achieve its nearest-term local government energy use or greenhouse gas goal.

Reporting 

Chicago reports progress towards its energy efficiency-related goals in the Sustainable Chicago Action Agenda annually in December. The most recent report was published in December 2015.

Last updated: January 2017

The Green Cincinnati Plan of 2013 includes a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from local governments operations by 2% annually between 2013 and 2020, culminating in an 80% reduction by 2050. The goal is community-wide and includes city government buildings. The plan was formally adopted by the Cincinnati City Council in June 2013.

Stringency

In order to meet its local government greenhouse gas emissions goal, Cincinatti would need to reduce emissions by 2% per year.

Progress

We did not find quantitative data indicating Cincinnati was on track to achieve its local government greenhouse gas goal.

Reporting

The city tracks and reports progress toward its goals to city council on an annual basis. It is in the process of providing the public with access to the various sustainability indicators through its open data portal

Last updated: January 2017

The Sustainable Cleveland Municipal Action Plan (SC-MAP) identified the overarching goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from local government operations 10% below 2010 levels by 2016, 20% below 2010 levels by 2020, and 45% below 2010 levels by 2030. As part of this goal, Cleveland set targets to reduce total energy consumption across all city departments 5% below 2010 levels by 2016, 10% below 2010 levels by 2020, and 20% below 2010 levels by 2030.

According to data in Cleveland's 2014 CDP submission, the city reduced its local government greenhouse gas emissions by 2% between 2010 and 2012.

Stringency

In order to meet its local government goal, Cleveland would need to reduce energy use by 1% per year.

Progress

We did not find quantitative data indicating Cleveland was on track to achieve its nearest-term local government energy goal.

Reporting

Cleveland annually reports its greenhouse gas emissions to the Carbon Disclosure Project and annually reports building energy usage in a sampling of buildings as required by their Better Buildings goal. Implementation of the Municipal Action Plan has been integrated into the larger Sustainable Cleveland initiative, which includes numerous community engagements throughout the year including the Annual Sustainable Cleveland Summit

Last updated: January 2017

In 2016 Columbus adopted the goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions from government operations 30% by 2020, from 2005 levels. Green Memo III further describes ways the city can encourage and support energy efficiency.

Stringency

To meet this goal, Columbus would need to reduce operations emissions by 2% per year.

Progress

Columbus is currently on track for its local government greenhouse gas goal. 

Reporting

Columbus releases annual progress reports on the city’s sustainability efforts for the Get Green Columbus Initiative, including progress toward the overall government operations goal. Columbus published progress toward its greenhouse gas target in Green Memo III. The city also registered its municipal buildings in Columbus’s GreenSpot program, which is a community-wide program to recognize green buildings. The city does not use an independent firm for evaluation, monitoring, and verification of progress toward goals. 

Last updated: January 2017

Dallas has a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from its local government operations 39% relative to 1990 emissions by September 2017. It reported this goal in the Dallas City Council’s 2014 Annual Report. This adopted target is a stepping stone to the city’s larger aim to be carbon neutral by 2050.

Stringency

To meet this goal, Dallas would need to reduce emissions from city government operations by 1.4% per year.

Progress

Dallas is not currently on track for its local government greenhouse gas goal.

Reporting

Dallas releases annual sustainability progress reports that include information on local government operations-related efforts to increase energy efficiency. 

Last updated: January 2017

Denver's 2020 goals include a target to reduce energy consumed in city-operated buildings, the Denver International Airport (DIA), and city vehicles by 20% compared to a 2012 baseline. Denver has also committed to the Department of Energy’s Better Buildings Challenge (BBC), which requires it to reduce the source energy use intensity (EUI) of its buildings 20% by 2020, from 2011.All of the 2020 Sustainability Goals are authorized in Executive Order 123. The Sustainability Implementation Council (SIC) has charged General Services with coordinating efforts among city agencies to achieve the 2020 Sustainability energy goal and the BBC goal. The Green Fleet Committee, an interagency committee also established by EO 123, meets quarterly and supplements General Services efforts by ensuring progress toward achieving the sustainability goals specifically for the fleet.

Stringency

To meet this goal, Denver would need to reduce energy use by 2.5% per year.

Progress

The city is not on track for its Sustainable 2020 local government energy use goal. 

Reporting

Denver’s Strategic Initiatives office, within the Department of General Services, publishes an annual report detailing the city’s utility budget, progress on its Better Building Challenge goal, and other energy consumption-related metrics. Additionally, each agency is required to do an annual Peak Performance presentation to the Mayor and his top advisors, which are published online. 

Last updated: January 2017

We did not find information regarding an energy efficiency-related goal for Detroit’s local government operations. 

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

We did not find information detailing the frequency of public reporting on Detroit’s energy-related activities.

Last updated: January 2017

The Dubuque City Council adopted a community-wide goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 50% below 2003 levels by 2030, but municipal activities are expected to make up a significant portion of this reduction.  We did not collect information on the extent to which formal agency stakeholder groups were involved in setting the goal.

Last updated: October 2013

The Livable City Sustainability Plan, adopted through Resolution 50455, includes a goal to reduce El Paso’s local government energy consumption by 30% below 2008 levels by 2014. According to data provided by the Sustainability Office, the city reduced its energy use by 32% between FY 2007 and FY 2013. El Paso has not updated their local government energy-related goals since.

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

N/A

Last updated: January 2017

City Council Resolution 4130-09-2012 formally adopted a goal to reduce Fort Worth’s electricity consumption 5% each fiscal year for ten years beginning in 2011, in compliance with Texas state law SB 898. The city also has a goal under DOE’s Better Buildings Challenge that includes municipal buildings. We could not confirm if the city has a goal that covers all its local government operations, however, the Fort Worth City Council appointed a Sustainability Task Force to investigate ways to ensure city infrastructure and resources can keep pace with growth. The second phase of the process detailed ways to improve city operations to further sustainability goals, including initiatives related to energy usage in municipal buildings and fuel consumption of the vehicle fleet. The Sustainability Task Force is comprised of individuals from local government and non-profits.

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

Fort Worth does not publish internal energy use data but municipal energy use is included in the Fort Worth Better Buildings data posted annually on the DOE website

Last updated: January 2017

Hartford's Clean Energy Taskforce is developing an energy reduction plan for the city, which will include strategies for local government assets. The primary focus of the plan will be energy consumption in buildings; transportation-related energy use may be added after the initial plan is released.

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

We could not confirm the frequency of the city's public reporting on its energy efficiency activities.

Last updated: January 2017

Houston had a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from local government operations by 36% by 2016. The Planning Department is leading the effort to create a general plan for the city and the city has drafted a sustainability plan for municipal operations. The City of Houston is a Department of Energy’s Better Buildings Challenge partner and has committed 30 million square feet, 7 million from municipal buildings, to achieve a 20% reduction in energy by 2020 from a 2008 baseline.

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

The City of Houston annually reports to the Carbon Disclosure Project on its government and community sustainability initiatives. The data is made publicly available through the CDP website. According to their 2014 CDP submission, the city reduced its greenhouse gas emissions from local government operations by 43% between 2007 and 2013. In addition, Schneider Electric provides energy savings reports as part of their energy service performance contract (ESPC) with the city.  

Last updated: January 2017

Indianapolis does not have an energy efficiency-related goal for its local government operations. The city did take part in the STAR Rating System pilot program and will be working toward objectives identified in the “Climate and Energy” goal area. 

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

Indianapolis publicly released annual sustainability reports until 2012, and it is unclear if the reports detailed energy efficiency activities for local government operations.

Last updated: January 2017

Jacksonville will assist Florida in creating a plan to help the state achieve its Clean Power Plan goal. Otherwise, Jacksonville does not have an energy efficiency-related goal for its local government operations.

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

Jacksonville does not annually report on its energy efficiency activities for its local government operations.

Last updated: January 2017

The Climate Protection Plan of 2008 includes a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from local government operations 30% below 2000 levels by 2020. This goal includes emissions from all city-owned and leased operations, facilities, and sources. Kansas City Council formally adopted the plan and its goals in 2008 through Resolution 080754.

Stringency

To meet this goal, Kansas City would need to reduce emissions by 1.5% per year.

Progress

Kansas City is on track for its local government greenhouse gas goal.

Reporting

Kansas City produces annual sustainability reports that detail progress toward its energy-related activities. The city further evaluates progress towards its GHG targets through updates to its Greenhouse Gas Inventory. The most recent update occurred in 2013, and the city has almost completed updates for 2014 and 2015.

Last updated: January 2017

The city’s stated goals for its local government operations are to reduce greenhouse emissions 12% under 2005 levels by 2012, 15% by 2015, and 20% by 2020.  In 2012, the City Council passed a resolution adopting the 20% by 2020 energy reduction goal.

Last updated: October 2015

The Sustainable Energy Strategy includes goals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from local government operations 10% below 2008 levels by 2011, 20% below 2008 levels by 2020, and 30% below 2008 levels by 2030. The strategy was adopted by the city council in 2008. The city also has a goal in its 2013 Strategic Business Plan to reduce its local government operations energy consumption 20% from a 2008 baseline by FY 2016.

Stringency

To meet their greenhouse gas reduction goal, Las Vegas would need to reduce emissions by 1.7% per year.

Progress

Las Vegas is on track for its local government greenhouse gas goal.

Reporting

Las Vegas publishes quarterly scorecards detailing the local government’s energy and water use and costs. The city also publishes an annual report that includes details on some government operations-related efficiency projects and briefs for the city council. According to their 2016 submission to CDP, the city reduced its greenhouse gas emissions from local government operations by 38% between 2008 and 2016. The city has already achieved it GHG-related 2020 local government goal.

Last updated: January 2017

The Climate Protection Plan called for goals applying to both the community-at-large and local government operations that would reduce greenhouse gas emissions 30% below 2005 levels by 2020, 50% by 2030, 70% by 2040, and 80% by 2050.  Horizon 2020, the city and county's long-range planning document, recently incorporated an environment chapter, which refers to the recommendations made in the Climate Protection Plan.  We did not collect information on the extent to which formal agency stakeholder groups were involved in setting the goal.

Last updated: October 2015

The City of Los Angeles released a Sustainable City pLAn in 2015, which set energy usage and greenhouse gas emission reduction goals. The city plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 35% by 2025 and 55% by 2035, from a 2008 baseline. It plans to reduce municipal energy usage 5% every year, with a long-term goal of 18% by 2025 and 25% by 2035 relative to 2013. The energy and GHG goals were both adopted through an executive directive issues by the Mayor.

Stringency

To meet its municipal energy savings goal, Los Angeles would need to reduce energy usage by 1.5% per year.

Progress

Although the city reported reducing municipal energy use 7% from 2014 to 2015, we did not find quantitative data indicating Los Angeles was on track to achieve its nearest-term local government energy use or greenhouse gas goals.

Reporting

The city will track progress towards outcomes and targets in the Sustainable City pLAn through annual reports, the first of which was released in 2016. In addition, Los Angeles publishes data sets on the local government's energy and water use on the city’s data portal

Last updated: January 2017

In Sustain Louisville, the Louisville Metro Government set a goal to decrease energy use in city-owned buildings 30% by 2018 from a 2010 baseline.

Stringency

To meet this goal, Louisville would need to reduce energy use by 3.8% per year.

Progress

The city is not currently on track for its local government energy use goal.

Reporting

Louisville reports on some of its efficiency-related activities for its local government operations through the annual Sustain Louisville Progress Report. According to their 2015 progress report, Louisville reduced energy consumption in city-owned buildings by 11% between 2010 and 2015. Additionally, Louisville Metro Government hosts a citystat program called LouieStat, and the Office of Sustainability has its own version called SustainStat, used to report on the status of these goals to Mayor Fischer three to four times per year.

Last updated: January 2017

The Madison Sustainability Plan calls for municipal operations to achieve the same goal as the community, namely an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions below 2008 levels, and has specific actions to reduce emissions in city operations.  The Madison Common Council adopted the sustainability plan in May 2012 by City Resolution 21481.  We did not collect information on the extent to which formal agency stakeholder groups were involved in setting the goal.

Last updated: October 2013

The Sustainable Shelby Implementation Plan discusses initiatives for local government operations, but it does not set energy-related goals for local government operations. The recently announced Memphis Clean and Green Initiative aims to reduce municipal energy costs by 20% annually within five years by increasing energy efficiency in municipal buildings. In 2015, the city committed to the Compact of Mayors and the Office of Sustainability is currently completing an inventory of community-wide greenhouse gas emissions. As part of complying with this commitment, the city will set reduction targets for greenhouse gas emissions and complete a climate action plan by 2018. Local government energy efficiency goals and emissions reduction targets will likely be included in this plan.

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

As the city completes local government efficiency initiatives from the Sustainable Shelby Plan, their status is tracked on the plan’s website

Last updated: January 2017

MiPlan set a goal to reduce the city government’s greenhouse gas emissions 25% by 2015 from 2007 levels. The city council formally adopted this goal when they passed City Council Resolution 08-01096. The city has not updated this goal.

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

We did not find information detailing the frequency of public reporting on progress toward local government initiatives. 

Last updated: January 2017

The mayor issued an executive order to cut energy use in local government operations by 15% between 2005 and 2012, but Milwaukee does not have an overall post-2012 energy-related goal for local government operations. However, Milwaukee is a Better Buildings Community Partner and has a goal to reduce the energy intensity in a portfolio of municipal and private buildings by 20% by 2020 relative to a 2009 baseline.

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

Milwaukee’s progress toward its Better Buildings goal is publicly available on a Better Buildings webpage. The city regularly reports to community groups and the Milwaukee Common Council regarding progress towards ReFresh Milwaukee goals and consults with the groups as programs need to be adjusted. According to a 2014 report, Milwaukee reduced the energy intensity of a portion of its municipal building stock by 12% between 2009 and 2014. In addition, Milwaukee tracks municipal energy use through Portfolio Manager and shares its data with DOE and third party consultants for evaluation.

Last updated: January 2017

Greenprint, a subset of the Minneapolis Sustainability Indicators and and Numerical Targets, includes a goal to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from municipal operations by 1.5% annually. The city council formally approved the Sustainability Indicators, including those for Greenprint, in January 2012. Minneapolis does not currently have a formal energy efficiency goal for local government operations. However, the City does employ standard operating procedures to ensure energy efficiency is improved. Minneapolis meets with the electric utility, Xcel Energy, multiple times per year to discuss upcoming new construction and renovation projects, in an effort to ensure the most efficient systems are included and mechanical system rebates are maximized.

Stringency

To meet their reduction goal, Minneapolis would need to reduce emissions by 1.5% per year.

Progress

Minneapolis has reduced municipal emissions by an average of 4% per year between 2008 and 2012, exceeding their annual target.

Reporting

Minneapolis releases sustainability reports and greenhouse gas inventories annually and reports to the community on some of its local government operations initiatives through its performance evaluation system, Results Minneapolis. This performance management and monitoring tool now includes Minneapolis’ Sustainability Indicators and will likely include GHG data by the end of 2017. 

Last updated: January 2017

The Together Making Nashville Green Report contains goals to reduce local government operations and community-wide greenhouse gas emissions to 2005 levels by 2012, 20% below 2005 levels by 2020, and 80% below 2005 levels by 2050. In order to ensure Nashville remain a livable city, the major signed Executive Order 33 establishing the Green Ribbon Committee on Environmental Sustainability, which developed a report with sustainability action steps. In addition, Mayor Barry has appointed a Livable Nashville committee to develop a sustainability plan for the city of Nashville. The committee is in the process of setting local government energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals.

Stringency

To meet their reduction goal, Nashville would need to reduce emissions by 1.3% per year.

Progress

We did not find quantitative data indicating Nashville was on track to achieve its nearest-term local government greenhouse gas goal.

Reporting

Under the previous administration, an updated report on the Green Ribbon Committee Report, Together Making Nashville Green, was completed and published publically. This report does not include municipal GHG data, however, Metro Nashville is currently conducting a municipal and community greenhouse gas emissions inventory with outcomes expected by December 2016.  

Last updated: January 2017

New Orleans has not developed an energy efficiency-related goal for local government operations. The city is involved in the 100 Resilient Cities Initiatives of the Rockefeller Foundation and will be undertaking a planning process that may entail the development of a strategy or plan for addressing various issues, including energy efficiency.

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

The city publishes quarterly reports, Results NOLA, on departmental key performance indicators. New Orleans reports on some of its efficiency activities in these reports. 

Last updated: January 2017

Executive Order 109 of 2007 formally adopted a goal to reduce municipal greenhouse gas emissions 30% below 2005 levels by 2017 (30 x 17 Plan). Through the One City, Built to Last: Transforming New York City’s Buildings for a Low-Carbon Future plan, released in 2014, New York committed to reducing municipal emissions 35% below FY 2006 levels by 2025. This is an interim goal to lead by example in working to achieve the overall citywide goal of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Also as part of this plan, the City of New York publicly committed to investing over $1 billion to complete efficiency improvements in every municipal building with significant energy use (i.e. buildings that use over 5 MMBTU annually) by 2025. These goals were solidified in the passing of 2014 Local Law 66 of the New York City Council

Stringency

To meet their greenhouse gas reduction goal, New York City would need to reduce emissions by 1.8% per year.

Progress

New York City is currently on track for its local government greenhouse gas goal.

Reporting

Greenhouse gas inventories and progress reports are published annually and New York City Department of Citywide Administrative Services (DCAS) publicly reports on progress toward local government initiatives on a city webpage. According to data in the 2014 NYC Greenhouse Gas Inventory, the city reduced it greenhouse gas emissions from its local government operations by 12.8% between 2006 and 2014. 

Last updated: January 2017

The Energy and Climate Action Plan (ECAP) was adopted by Oakland’s City Council in 2012 and calls for a 36% greenhouse gas reduction from 2005 levels by 2020. Local government operations are included within this goal. We did not collect information on the extent to which formal agency stakeholder groups were involved in setting goals.

There is no goal that sets targes specifically for local government operations. 

Updated: Frebruary 2016

Oklahoma City does not have an energy efficiency-related goal for their local government operations, but they are working to develop a comprehensive strategy to decrease energy use in government operations. The city anticipates finalizing this plan mid-2017.

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

We did not find information detailing the frequency of public reporting on Oklahoma City’s energy efficiency activities.

Last updated: January 2017

The Municipal Operations Sustainability Plan has a goal to reduce municipal energy consumption 10% below 2010 levels by 2017 and 50% below 2010 levels by 2030. The plan also has a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from local government operations 15% from 2010 levels by 2017 and be greenhouse gas neutral by 2030. In 2013, the city council formally adopted the Greenworks Plan. Orlando’s 2012 municipal sustainability plan further details their specific local government goals and strategies. This plan is in the process of being updated and will be introduced as a resolution for adoption by the Mayor and City Council in early 2017.

Stringency

To meet their energy reduction goal, Orlando would need to reduce usage by 1.4% per year.

Progress

We did not find quantitative data indicating Orlando was on track to achieve its nearest-term local government energy or emissions goals. Orlando is currently updating its inventories and will release finalized inventories in 2015. 

Reporting

Public updates on local government operations efficiency efforts are given to the city council when requested. It is unclear if Orlando annually publishes or provides annual public reports on its local government operations energy efficiency activities. 

Last updated: January 2017

We did not find information regarding a greenhouse gas or energy use reduction goal in Park City. 

Last updated: October 2015

Greenworks included a target to lower the local government’s energy consumption by 30% from 2008 levels by 2015, as well a goal to reduce local government’s greenhouse gas emissions by 20% from 2008 levels by 2015. These goals have now expired, but the city is currently working to establish new local government energy and climate targets by Spring 2017.

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

According to data in the 2016 Greenworks Progress Report, the city reduced it greenhouse gas emissions from its local government operations by 23% between 1990 and 2015 and the city’s local government energy use increased by 4% between 2008 and 2015. Philadelphia met its 2015 municipal greenhouse gas emission goal but did not meet its energy usage goal. The city is exploring adding metrics that measure consumption on a per capita basis and normalize for weather.

Last updated: January 2017

In December 2008, the city council adopted Resolution 20759 to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from local government operations 5% below 2005 levels by 2015. According to data in the 2012 Greenhouse Gas Emissions Report, the city reduced its greenhouse gas emissions from its local government operations by 7% between 2005 and 2012, thereby exceeding its goal. Phoenix updated this goal to a 15% GHG reduction by 2015, then exceeded this goal as well. Phoenix is currently working to formally adopt a new goal to reduce local government emissions 30% by 2025.

In addition, the city adopted a long term goal to be carbon neutral city-wide by 2060 and have all city operations carbon neutral by 2050.

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

The city reports progress on its energy efficiency-related activities in annual sustainability reports. Arizona State University (ASU) oversees the city’s greenhouse gas inventories; energy savings from retrofit projects are reviewed by the local utility partner (APS) and ASU.

Last updated: January 2017

The Pittsburgh Climate Action Plan v2.0 includes a recommendation to improve energy efficiency in city-owned buildings by 20% over five years. Pittsburgh formally adopted a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 20% below 2003 levels by 2023 through City Council Resolution 2012-0018. The goal applies community-wide and to local government operations. Several city agencies, including the Urban Redevelopment Authority, Water and Sewer Authority, and Housing Authority, have developed their own goals to align with the Climate Action Plan. In 2015 Mayor William Peduto increased city goals at the Compact of Parties (COP 21) forum in Paris. Those goals – covering City government-owned facilities, fleet and infrastructure – require a 50% energy consumption reduction by 2030, from 2013 levels. The new goals outlined by the Mayor are currently accepted as a matter of practice in Pittsburgh and will be integrated into the new Climate Action Plan, which will undergo review by City Council for official approval and adoption through Resolution in 2017.

Stringency

To meet this goal, Pittsburgh would need to reduce energy usage by 2.9% per year.

Progress

We did not find quantitative data indicating Pittsburgh was on track to achieve its local government energy goal. The city is currently updating its third greenhouse gas inventory, which is expected to reflect progress toward achieving energy and climate goals.

Reporting

Pittsburgh publishes its local government operations efficiency-related activities in several reports: the State of Sustainability report (annual), greenhouse gas inventory (every five years), and climate action plan updates (every five years). Pittsburgh is currently working on updates to all three resources. In addition, the city tracks energy efficiency-related activities through submissions to the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) and the Better Buildings Challenge. 

Last updated: January 2017

Portland's Climate Action Plan includes a goal to reduce carbon emissions from city and county government operations 53% from FY 2006-2007 levels by 2030. Additionally, the city wants to reduce municipal operations’ energy usage by 2% annually from FY 2006-2007 levels. These goals were formally adopted when the Climate Action Plan was codified by binding city policy BCP-ENN-5.02. Each of Portland’s local government bureaus has a sustainability plan for its own operations and the overall GHG goals are being incorporated into the city’s draft update to the Comprehensive Plan, which is in process.

Stringency

To meet its local government energy goal, Portland would need to reduce energy usage by 2% per year.

Progress

Portland is not on track for its energy use goal.

Reporting

Portland releases annual climate action plan progress reports reporting on the implementation status of various energy programs. The city is in the process of updating a progress report to the Climate Action Plan (2015).

Last updated: January 2017

As part of its city energy plan, Providence established a goal to reduce energy use in municipal buildings by 30% under 2010 levels by 2030. The city also has a goal to be carbon neutral city-wide by 2050, including municipal buildings. This goal is in line with the statewide Rhode Island Resilient Act of 2014, which calls for an 85% reduction in emissions by 2050.

Stringency

To meet their energy reduction goal, Providence would need to reduce local government energy usage by 1.5% per year.

Progress

Providence is on track for its local government energy and emissions goal.

Reporting

The city released its first municipal energy report in 2015. It is modeled after similar building energy benchmarking reports from major cities and highlights municipal building metrics such as Energy Star Scores, EUI and energy cost, as well as success stories and plans for future energy efficiency efforts. The report will be updated for 2016. The metrics included in the report are also posted on the city’s open data portal, which will also be updated this year.

Last updated: January 2017

We did not find information regarding an energy efficiency-related goal for Raleigh’s local government operations.

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

We did not find information detailing the frequency of public reporting on Raleigh’s energy efficiency activities.

Last updated: January 2017

The 2006 Green Government Order formally established a goal to reduce energy usage from local government operations at least 1% annually compared to 2008 levels. The 2011 Energy Management Plan provided guidance to each city agency to mainstream across their operations. In the 2014 RVAgreen Annual Progress Report, Mayor Dwight C. Jones established the goal to reduce city government greenhouse gas emissions by 80% by 2050, using 2008 as a baseline.

Stringency

To meet their energy reduction goal, Richmond would need to reduce local government energy usage by 1% per year.

Progress

We did not find quantitative data indicating Richmond was on track to achieve its local government energy goal, and Richmond is not on track for its greenhouse gas goal.

Reporting

Richmond reports on progress towards its goals on an annual basis. The city has released 2013 figures and is in the process of updating 2014 and 2015 figures. 

Last updated: January 2017

In 2016, the Riverside Restorative Growthprint – Economic Prosperity Action Plan/Climate Action Plan (RRG-EPAP/CAP) was adopted by City Council (Resolution No. 22942). This plan includes local government operations greenhouse gas reduction goals of 15% by 2020 and 49% by 2035, from 2007 levels. Riverside has a community-wide energy efficiency-related goal which includes government buildings, but Riverside does not have a specific goal for its local government operations.

Stringency

To meet this goal, Riverside would need to reduce emissions by 1.2% per year.

Progress

We did not find quantitative data indicating Riverside was on track to achieve its nearest-term local government greenhouse gas goal.

Reporting

The City of Riverside reports annually to the California Energy Commission on its energy conservation goals through the California Municipal Utilities Association 1037 report, however, we were unable to find municipal energy data in this report. In addition, every five years Riverside reports greenhouse gas emissions to the Western Riverside Council of Governments, however, we were unable to find municipal GHG data in this report.
 

Last updated: January 2017

The 2007 Sustainability Master Plan established a goal of reducing energy use in local government operations to 25% below 2005 levels by 2030. The Climate Action Plan, adopted February 14, 2012, established goals of reducing local government greenhouse gas emissions 22% below 2005 levels by 2020, 49% by 2035, and 83% by 2050. These goals have been adopted into the city’s 2035 General Plan.  

Stringency

To meet its energy use goal, Sacramento would need to reduce energy use by 1% per year.

Progress

We did not find quantitate data indicating Sacramento was on track to achieve its nearest-term local government energy goal.

Reporting

Sacramento reports on sustainability initiatives in its General Plan Annual Reports, which include municipal GHG data.

Last updated: January 2017

The Sustainable Salt Lake Plan identified a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from local government operations 13% below 2009 levels by 2015. This target was formally codified in the city’s Environmental Policy which required all city departments to maintain their own climate action plan in order to meet the city’s carbon reduction goals. To support this goal, the city enacted the Energy Management Executive Order in 2015, requiring the formation of an Energy Management Steering Committee with of representatives from each city department who must submit an annual departmental comprehensive Energy Management Plan. Each plan must include specific efforts for energy benchmarking, identification of energy savings opportunities, efficient operations best practices, building operator training, employee engagement, and renewable energy opportunities. Salt Lake City is in the process of adopting a new municipal energy savings target using a 2015 baseline, which will be published on the city’s new SLC Green Dashboard.

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

Salt Lake City's Sustainability Dashboard publicly discloses the progress of each target listed in the Sustainable Salt Lake Plan. The dashboard features municipal energy consumption data as well as an online venue called "Open City Hall" where residents can voice their perspectives on the city’s energy-related targets.

Last updated: January 2017

The Mission Verde Plan includes a goal to retrofit all city facilities by 2015, resulting in a 12% average facility energy savings, but San Antonio does not have an energy efficiency related goal for its entire local government operations. In February 2010, the Mission Verde Plan was adopted by the city council through a “Resolution Endorsing and Enhancing the Mission Verde Plan,” which formalized the retrofit goal for city facilities.

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

N/A

Last updated: January 2017

In 2015, the Mayor and City Council of San Diego adopted the Climate Action Plan (CAP), which sets a goal to reduce municipal emissions 15% by 2020, 40% by 2030, and 50% by 2035, from 2010 levels. The CAP also includes a goal to reduce municipal energy use 15% by 2020 and 25% by 2035, from 2010 levels.

Stringency

To meet this energy goal, San Diego would need to reduce energy use by 1.5% per year.

Progress

San Diego is not currently on track to achieve their local government energy goal, but the city is projected to achieve savings within 25% of this goal.

Reporting

San Diego is and will be conducting annual updates and reporting on progress towards its goals in a public report. The Annual Monitoring Report will include specific actions, proposed outcomes and a timeline with milestones to track success in meeting 2020 and 2035 goals. The FY17 Climate Action Plan Funding & Implementation Report provides an update to funding, budgeting and implementing strategies under the CAP. The city will produce an annual update of the city-wide greenhouse gas emissions inventory and progress towards goals will be published. The City will also complete an annual greenhouse gas inventory as part of the Annual Monitoring Report.

Last updated: January 2017

Section 902 of the Environment Code formally codified the city’s goals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 20% below 1990 levels by 2012, 25% by 2017, 40% by 2025, and 80% by 2050. Each city department is also required to developed its own climate action plan to detail the actions that department will take to achieve the local government’s overall goal.

Stringency

To meet this GHG goal, San Francisco would need to reduce emissions by 0.9% per year.

Progress

We did not find quantitative data indicating San Francisco was on track to achieve its local government greenhouse gas goals.

Reporting

San Francisco requires city departments to report greenhouse gas emissions in annual Departmental Climate Action Plans. Annual Green and Blue Awards celebrate outstanding accomplishments and leadership in the field of sustainability by city staff and departments. The Municipal Green Building Task Force meets monthly for professional development, administer updates to green building policy for municipal buildings, and to affirm city goals and requirements are met.

Last updated: January 2017

The city has an internal goal of achieving a 15% energy use reduction by 2018 from 2008 baseline, in accordance with the Bay Area Climate Change Compact. The city council authorized the mayor to sign the compact in October 2008.

Stringency

To meet this energy goal, San Jose would need to reduce energy use by 1.5% per year.

Progress

San Jose is currently on track for its local government energy goal.

Reporting

San Jose's Green Vision Report articulates the city’s energy efficiency-related goals and strategies for its internal government operations. These reports are released annually, published on the Green Vision website, and include benchmarking statistics to show progress toward some goals.

Last updated: January 2017

In 2011, City Council Resolution 31312 formally adopted a goal to reduce municipal energy use 20% by 2020 from a 2008 baseline.

Stringency

To meet this goal, Seattle would need to reduce energy use by 1.7% per year.

Progress

Seattle is currently on track for its local government energy goal.

Reporting

Seattle releases inventories publicly and annually updates its municipal operations’ Climate Action Work Plan and on the Performance Seattle Dashboard. The city tracks municipal GHG emissions through Municipal Operations Inventories using the Local Government Operations Protocol.

Last updated: January 2017

St. Louis does not have an energy efficiency-related goal for its local government operations.

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

St. Louis piloted the STAR community rating-system, which monitored local government sustainability initiatives, and the city holds annual Mayor’s Sustainability Summits that report on some efficiency-related initiatives for the city’s local government operations.

Last updated: January 2017

Tampa does not have an energy efficiency-related goal for its local government operations.

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

Tampa publicly releases annual sustainability reports detailing progress toward energy-related local government operations initiatives. In addition, Tampa publishes a variety of performance data on its Performance Measurement Dashboard. While this dashboard includes 2015/2016 municipal emissions data, it is uncertain that this data will be released on an annual basis. Tampa also releases several other sustainability reports.

Last updated: January 2017

In 2016 the City of Virginia Beach issued an administrative directive titled Energy Management for Municipal Operations, including a goal to reduce current municipal government energy consumption 5% by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Stringency

To meet this goal, Virginia Beach would need to reduce energy use by 1% per year.

Progress

Having reduced energy use 4% in the first year of this goal, Virginia Beach is on track for its local government energy use goal.

Reporting

While quarterly reports are sent to all city staff on their department’s energy usage and annual energy reports (the City of Virginia Beach Dashboard Report) is sent to City Council at the end of each fiscal year, Virginia Beach does not have a public, annual report on energy efficiency-related activities within its local government operations.

Last updated: January 2017

The district’s first climate action plan, which is currently being updated, established a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 30% below 2006 levels by 2020. The district also has a goal to reduce energy use in local government buildings in the Downtown DC Business Improvement District by 30% by 2020. We did not find information on whether either of these goals had been adopted by district resolution or formalized in an executive order.

Stringency

N/A

Progress

N/A

Reporting

We did not find information detailing the frequency of public reporting on the district's energy efficiency activities.

Last updated: January 2017