State and Local Policy Database

Procurement and Construction Policies

Purchasing and construction policies can be designed to factor energy efficiency into every-day government decisions. Policies that specify energy efficiency requirements help to institutionalize energy efficiency across all local government departments. This sub-category includes information on three topic areas:

  • Fleet Efficiency and Vehicle infrastructure Fuel efficiency or fuel-efficient vehicle type requirements for public fleet vehicles; Fleet right-sizing policies or vehicle culling requirements; anti-idling policies for government vehicles or other programs to encourage efficient vehicle behavior.
  • Public Lighting Efficiency requirements or upgrade programs for outdoor lighting (e.g. streetlights); Use of photo sensors or scheduling for outdoor lighting; Adoption of the Illuminating Engineering Society and the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance, participating in DOE’s High Performance Outdoor Lighting Accelerator, or other relevant policy.
  • New Buildings and Equipment Energy efficiency or green buildings requirements for new public buildings or major renovations; Energy efficiency or lifecycle cost considerations integrated into city’s procurement policy.

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Arlington’s Equipment Bureau Environmental Fleet Standards outline the county’s fuel efficiency requirements, including a provision stating that hybrid vehicles are the preferred replacements for non-public safety passenger vehicles. The county also has an anti-idling policy for non-public safety vehicles and participates in regional air quality programs to reduce fueling on predicted Code Orange and Red days. The county has one electric-vehicle charging station for its Chevy Volt, but it is not accessible to the public.

Public Lighting

The county has a program to replace all existing streetlights with more efficient LED lights and has installed over 6,000 LED streetlights through the program, approximately 85% of all streetlights in the county.  As new LED streetlights are being installed, radio controls are being installed so that the system will be able to use dimming and sensor functions.

New Buildings and Equipment

Arlington funds, designs, and constructs projects to a minimum of LEED Silver certification for owned and leased buildings, but this policy does not apply to Arlington Public Schools projects. The Arlington County Infrastructure Design and Construction Standard - Building Design requires energy and water efficient products including lighting, HVAC, and premium-efficient motors.  For example, the standard requires all appliances to be ENERGY STAR where applicable.

Last updated: October 2015

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Atlanta has recently made a commitment regarding the electrification of their public fleet, however the city does not have any fuel efficiency requirements for its public fleet vehicles in place.  Additionally, this city has a green fleet policy, and it is  reducing the size of its fleet by revoking vehicle take-home policies and undertaking a car share program. To further reduce fuel consumption, the city has two behavior-based policies.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Georgia Power replaced 100% of the street light with LEDs.Additionally, 33% of the city owned outdoor lights have been replaced, and the rest are programmed to be replaced in 2017. All streetlights are designed to be connected to photo sensors.

New Buildings and Equipment

In December 2003, the city passed a green building ordinance that applies to city-owned facilities and city-funded projects and more specifically to all new construction and renovation projects in which the building has 5,000 square feet of occupied space or the total project cost exceeds $2 million. The policy requires these projects to incorporate sustainable design principles and meet LEED Silver standards. At this time, the city has no energy efficiency procurement policies.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Resolution No. 20070215-023 establishes a goal for Austin’s fleet to be carbon-neutral by 2020 through the use of vehicles run on electricity and non-petroleum fuels. In addition, the city trains its employees on efficient driving behavior. Additionally, the city of Austin has a fuel conservation policy in place that promotes the purchase of fuel efficient vehicles, and makes electric/hybrid and alternative fueled vehicles a priority however it does not contain specific energy efficiency requirements. This city also uses AssetWorksFleetFocus M5 to monitor the use of its public fleet, nevertheless GPS technology has not been deployed yet.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Austin Energy has automated all of its 59,000 Austin Energy-owned streetlights and made them Dark-Sky compliant. Austin Energy has also converted more than 15,400 of its streetlights to LEDs. It is unclear if Austin has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance or a similar policy. 

New Buildings and Equipment

The city council passed Resolution No. 000608-43 in June 2000 requiring that all future public building projects of more than $2 million to be built to LEED Silver standards. The resolution required the city manager to evaluate the feasibility of requiring that buildings maintained, leased, or financed by the city be operated and maintained in a way that improves indoor air quality and energy conservation. The city council passed Resolution No. 20071129-045 in 2007, which built upon the June 2000 resolution. In addition to achieving LEED Silver standards in new public buildings and major renovations, buildings must achieve the highest optimal levels of sustainability. As part of this requirement, a number of measures in buildings must be considered, including energy-use monitoring and the reduction of building energy use in accordance with City of Austin Administrative Bulletin 05-01 (Designation of Energy Manager and Establishment of Energy Efficiency Policy). Also, the city must purchase or lease ENERGY STAR office equipment if available, in accordance with City of Austin Administrative Bulletin 05-01. 

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

The city of Baltimore does not have fuel efficiency requirements for its public fleet vehicles or any procurement policies that prioritize the purchase of energy efficient vehicles. However, Baltimore adopted a goal to reduce petroleum usage by 20% by 2017. The Office of Sustainable Energy developed a 20­ year fleet replacement schedule to help achieve this goal and right-size the fleet. By 2017, the average age of the fleet will decrease from 8 years to 4, increasing fuel efficiency by an expected 16% and decreasing maintenance.  Additionally, this city monitors the use of its public fleet through the FASTER asset management data base software, which incorporates GPS technology to increase public fleet efficiency.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included. 

Public Lighting

On December 5, 2011, the Mayor of Baltimore signed an amendment to Baltimore City Code Article 26 § 13-1, titled "Street lamps, etc." This revision added the statement that the "Department of Transportation must…ensure that, on or before June 30th 2013, all city electric street lamps are equipped with energy efficient light emitting diode lights or similar cost-effective technology." All traffic lights have been changed to LED’s. In 2012, the city switched the first 11,000 streetlights to LEDs. In 2014, the city conducted an LED light pilot. Although, lights do not have motion sensors, the city’s exterior street, building and sports lighting have photocells and operate only during certain hours. 

New Buildings and Equipment

Baltimore has adopted the International Green Construction Code 2012 as an overlay to the City’s building, fire and related codes, which became effective on 2015. Additionally, in 2013 the city adopted the most recent International Electric Code.  Moreover, the City’s Green Building Standards (Council Bill 07-0602) require LEED Silver certification for public buildings and achievement of LEED certification for publicly funded buildings greater than 10,000 square feet. Although it seems that the city departments tasked with building renovations purchase energy star appliances and high energy efficiency equipment, we could not confirm the existence of any kind of energy efficiency purchasing guidelines.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

We did not find information regarding fuel efficiency requirements for the public fleet. We also did not find information on a fleet right-sizing policy, culling requirements, anti-idling policy for fleet vehicles, or other policies to encourage the efficient use of the public fleet.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if Birmingham has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance.

New Buildings and Equipment

We did not find information regarding energy efficiency requirements for new public buildings or efficiency requirements in the city’s procurement policy.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

The 2007 executive order on climate action required that municipal departments purchase hybrid, alternative-fueled, or high-efficiency vehicles whenever possible; newmotor vehicles shall be the most fuel-efficient within their vehicle class. Boston also has established a motor pool, FleetHub, using car-sharing technology, allowing the city to reduce the fleet size and maximize the use of existing stock. Additionally, Boston’s central fleet uses FleetWave as a business management tool to drive efficient operations; all central fleet vehicles are equipped with electronic IDs that track fueling.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Boston has not yet adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, the Energy Reduction Plan specifies a 40% reduction goal for energy use of streetlights in the city. The City of Boston is currently retrofitting its mercury and sodium vapor lighting to LED luminaires. To date, 76.3% of the City’s 64,000 electric street lights have been retrofitted, resulting in 35.6 million kWh in annual electriCity savings. The city's goal is to replace all of its streetlights with LEDs over the next few years.

New Buildings and Equipment

The 2007 executive order directed that all new municipal buildings must be LEED Silver Certified, and new and renovated buildings must exceed LEED energy standards by 14 and 7 percent, respectively. Projects funded by the city under the Department of Neighborhood Development’s Green Affordable Housing Program must also meet the LEED Silver standards. Massachusetts State law mandates life cycle cost estimates for the early designs of new state or municipal buildings or energy systems (Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 149, Section 44M). The Purchasing Office and the Department of Innovation and Technology were required to issue Environmentally Preferable Procurement Guidelines, but it is unclear if energy efficiency requirements were included as part of these procurement guidelines.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

We did not find information on fleet fuel efficiency requirements or implemented anti-idling or right-sizing policies.  Boulder has installed 11 Level electric-vehicle charging stations with four that are available for public use. 

Public Lighting

In 2003, the Boulder City Council approved an outdoor lighting ordinance requiring non-compliant lighting fixtures to be replaced by August 15, 2018.  In its 2016 Capital Improvement Program, the city has allocated funding to replace its outdoor lights with compliant lights..  A new city-owned streetlight system currently under construction will turn on lights at a programmed time and dim them during period of low traffic. 

New Buildings and Equipment

Municipal construction follows local building code requirements which mandate a 30% increase in energy efficiency above the IECC 2006 at minimum.  Also, there is a goal in Boulder’s Master Plan calling for the city's new construction and major reconstruction to achieve at least LEED Silver Certification, but we do not know if this has been implemented.  The city has had an Environmental Purchasing Policy in place since 2002 that requires certain products, such as copy paper and business cards, to be purchased from recycled content.

Last updated: October 2015

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Burlington has installed several electric-vehicle charging stations, but we do not know if they are available to the public.  We did not find information regarding fuel efficiency requirements for the municipal vehicle fleet and we did not find information regarding right-sizing policies or anti-idling policies. 

Public Lighting

We did not find information regarding efficiency requirements for public outdoor lighting, but the city does have a goal in its climate action plan to replace all existing streetlights with LEDs.  All streetlights have photo sensors, so they only operate from dawn to dusk.

New Buildings and Equipment

We did not find information regarding energy efficiency requirements for new public buildings. Burlington has adopted an Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Policy that requires the city to purchase products that meet or exceed ENERGY STAR certification when possible.

Last updated: October 2015

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Carrboro has purchased hybrids vehicles for its fleet in recent years, but we could not confirm if the town has formal fuel efficiency requirements or requirements for fuel-efficient vehicle types.  The town has adopted both a right-sizing policy and anti-idling policy for its fleet.  Carrboro does not have town-operated electric vehicle charging stations.

Public Lighting

Carrboro does not have efficiency requirements for public outdoor lighting, but the town has begun an outdoor replacement program and streetlights are scheduled to operate only when needed.

New Buildings and Equipment

While Carrboro does not have formal energy efficiency requirements for new municipal buildings, the town recently constructed its new fire station to LEED silver standards.  The town has built one new building since the first half of the 20th century, with one potential new building in the next decade; therefore, a broad building policy was not adopted.  Carrboro does not have a procurement policy that has provisions for energy efficiency.

Last updated: April 2014

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Charlotte's Fleet and Motorized Equipment Asset Management Policy requires the city to “purchase, lease, or otherwise obtain the most energy efficient assets that meet the operational needs of the business unit or agency for which the assets are intended, consistent with its budgetary constraints.” However, the city does not have a specific policy requiring the purchase of energy-efficient vehicles. As for fleet tracking, Charlotte uses a non-web-based management tool called TransitMaster which allows tracking of individual buses.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Charlotte has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. The city has a pilot LED project in Uptown Charlotte. 229 LED fixtures were installed in 2012. In addition, the city will now use LED fixtures for any new fixture installed. All streetlights have photo sensors, so they only operate from dawn to dusk.

New Buildings and Equipment

Charlotte has a Policy for Sustainable Facilities, , which has just been approved to include existing building renovations.A key element of the policy is to reduce energy use and carbon footprint. The policy states that new city facilities must “meet current State Statute (GS 143-135.37) energy consumption targets, which at the time of policy adoption are: new facility consumption calculation 30% below ASHRAE requirement, and major renovation consumption calculation 20% below ASHRAE requirement.” The city uses an environmentally preferable purchasing guide that includes ENERGY STAR guidelines.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

While the fleet manager reviews vehicle purchase requests for vehicle fuel efficiency, we could not confirm if Charlottesville had enacted formal efficiency requirements for the city fleet.  In 2007, the city enacted an anti-idling policy for the municipal vehicle fleet.  Charlottesville has installed electric vehicle charging stations, but they are only for government vehicles.  

Public Lighting

An energy efficiency standard for public lighting is not in place, but Charlottesville has begun an outdoor lighting replacement program for publicly-owned lighting.  The city converted the majority of its traffic signals and streetlights to LEDs and is committed to continuing to do so going forward.  All streetlights have photo sensors, so they only operate from dawn to dusk.

New Buildings and Equipment

In September 2008, the Charlottesville City Council adopted a resolution requiring city construction projects to meet LEED standards, but we could not confirm if the requirement includes any additional specific standards for energy efficiency.  We also could not confirm if the city has energy efficiency provisions in its procurement policy.  

Last updated: October 2015

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

According to the 2015 Sustainable Chicago Action Plan, the city aims to reduce municipal fossil fuel consumption by 10%, replace 3% of on-road fleet vehicles with cleaner vehicles annually, and reduce the energy intensity of Chicago Transit Authority rail service by 12% from 2011 levels. Additionally, the City’s Fleet and Facilities Management (2FM) Department has a policy to increase the number of non-CPD (Chicago Police Department) leased light-duty vehicles to 366. This policy has reduced the size of the City’s light-duty fleet; lowered the average age of light-duty vehicles being used by the City; and reduced fuel use and maintenance expenses. This city monitors the use of its public fleet through the Fleet Center System, which incorporates GPS technology to increase public fleet efficiency.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

The City of Chicago owns and operates all of the public outdoor lighting used to illuminate this city’s roadways, sidewalks, alleys, bike lanes, and park paths.  While there is no current ordinance requiring the dimming of public outdoor lighting, Chicago is finishing up the procurement of a large scale lighting modernization project that will impact 85% of Chicago’s outdoor lights.  The luminaire specification for all LED fixtures included in the Chicago Smart Light Program requires dimmable drivers and receptacles for 7-pin light control devices.  One of the project objectives is to create the capability to implement a city-wide adaptive lighting strategy that will provide light only where and when it is needed.  The combination of a lighting management system and “smart luminaires” is projected to reduce lighting electric consumption by at least 60%.

New Buildings and Equipment

The city requires LEED Silver certification for all new municipal buildings and significant renovations. Under the city’s Sustainable Development Policy, any projects receiving assistance or in a planned development zone must meet LEED Silver standards or better. As part of LEED certification for new municipal buildings policy, ENERGY STAR and WaterSense labeled fixtures are required. The city also requires ENERGY STAR for new appliance purchases.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Cincinnati does not have specific fuel efficiency requirements for the city fleet, but all city employees must take an Ecodriving Course designed to teach vehicles operators how to operate and maintain vehicles in a manner that improves vehicle fuel efficiency. As part of the Green Cincinnati Plan, the city is reviewing its entire fleet to determine if a vehicle is being used for the appropriate function and if it should continue to be used for that function, replaced, or is no longer needed. At this time, the city of Cincinnati does not have a specific procurement policy for energy efficient vehicles, nor does it employ web-based fleet management tools.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Cincinnati has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. Streetlights are scheduled, so they only operate when needed. Additionally, through performance contracts, Cincinnati has upgraded all city owned and operated street lights (5,000) to LED technology.

New Buildings and Equipment

The Green Guidelines for the School Facility Master Plan require schools and public buildings to meet LEED standards, but we could not confirm if the requirements specifically emphasized completion of the energy efficiency elements of the certification. Cincinnati’s procurement policy does not contain energy efficiency requirements. 

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Cleveland does not have efficiency requirements for its fleet, although this city has no formal procurement policy for the purchase of energy-efficient vehicles, it currently has approximately 78 hybrid electric vehicles, 2 plug-in electric vehicles, 10 CNG vehicles and 250 E85 vehicles in its overall fleet.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Cleveland has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. This city does not have a formal outdoor lighting replacement and upgrade program, but when funds for retrofitting existing facilities are available, the city has been retrofitting such facilities with energy efficient outdoor lighting. 

New Buildings and Equipment

The Sustainable Municipal Building Policy requires new municipal construction and major renovations to achieve LEED Silver standards and achieve energy efficiency levels 30% beyond ASHRAE 90.1. The policy also requires the city to purchase ENERGY STAR appliances and water efficient products.  

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Columbus does not have efficiency requirements for its fleet, however, the Division of Fleet Management approves each and every vehicle and off-road equipment specification before it can proceed through the purchasing approval path.  When it reaches the Fleet level for approval, then Fleet ensures that when available, an energy efficient vehicle/equipment shall be specified. The goal is to purchase energy efficient vehicles when possible. Additionally, the city has adopted its Green Fleet Action Plan and provides annual progress reports. The plan includes targets to reduce overall fuel use of the city fleet by 2% by 2014, reduce petroleum use by 5% by 2014, and purchase at least 50% "green" light-duty vehicles. It also integrates right-sizing of the fleet and promotion of the anti-idling policy. The city currently counts 2,500 vehicle units with web based GPS technology which allows for the implementation of fuel saving programs and route optimization.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Columbus has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. The city has piloted LED streetlights, drafted LED streetlight design standards, and is requiring that all newly installed street lights are LED. Pedestrian signals are all LEDs and future installations will be LED as well.

Streetlights are controlled by a photoelectric control to come on between dusk and dawn.

New Buildings and Equipment

City-owned buildings and any building in which city dollars are invested that is new contruction or undergoes major renovations must be LEED Silver certified. We could not confirm if the city's green procurement policy calls for energy-efficient equipment.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Dallas does not have efficiency requirements for its fleet, but the city introduced 25 electric vehicles into its fleet in 2012.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Dallas has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. Dallas replaced 75 school zone flashers with solar powered LEDs and the Green Building Ordinance has some energy efficiency measures and requirements for lighting cut-offs.

New Buildings and Equipment

Dalla's green building program requires all new municipal and city-funded buildings larger than 10,000 square feet be constructed to meet LEED Gold certification standards. The update also included additional requirements for water use reduction (20%) and optimizing energy performance (3 points, 1 point above mandatory certification minimum) for these facilities.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Per Executive Order 3 regarding the Motor Vehicle Program for the City and County of Denver, the Acquisition of all Fleet Vehicles is to be done in accordance with Executive Order 123  (EO 123).  EO 123 requires the purchase of hybrids and the most fuel-efficient vehicles available for the light duty fleet wherever cost and reliability are similar. Additionally, this city is exploring the incorporation of a mandate to purchase at least 100 plug-in electric vehicles within the public works and safety departments by the end of 2020.  This city monitors the use of its public fleet through the FASTER asset management data base software, which incorporates GPS technology to increase public fleet efficiency. Denver also uses Zonar as a GPS tracking technology within the Public Works, Parks and Facilities fleet. The technology is deployed on about 500 vehicles so far.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Denver does not have a dedicated policy that approximates the Model Lighting Ordinance, but the Outdoor Lighting section in Div 10.7 of the Denver Zoning Code touches on some similar themes, including requiring full cutoff fixtures to reduce light spill into the night sky, as well as other provisions that are intended to reduce glare onto the public right-of-way and adjacent properties.  Streetlights are owned by the electric utility, Xcel Energy. Denver is continuing to work with Xcel to establish terms for a comprehensive LED replacement program for municipal street lights. Denver has an LED pilot project of 69 lights in the Highlands neighborhood of the city in conjunction with Xcel Energy. Denver is also replacing each of its intersection street lights to LED whenever intersection work is done.

New Buildings and Equipment

Chapter 2 of Executive Order 123 requires all new city projects and major remodels to achieve LEED BD+C Gold certification, with a goal of achieving LEED Platinum, and to meet ENERGY STAR guidelines. Any entity using city bonding capacity must design and build to achieve LEED Gold certification. The executive order also details Denver’s environmentally preferable procurement policy that requires assessing total cost of ownership. Agencies are directed to procure energy-efficient products and services.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Detroit’s city code (Part 3 § 55-6-91) prohibits commercial vehicles weighing over 8,500 lbs from idling for more than five minutes except in case of emergency, but the city does not have an ant-idling policy for its municipal fleet. We did not find information regarding fuel efficiency requirements for the public fleet.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Detroit is a partner in the DOE High Performance Outdoor Lighting Accelerator whose aim is to demonstrate practical and effective best practices to accelerate the adoption of high-efficiency outdoor lighting and impose system-wide replacement processes at the municipal level. Detroit has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance.

New Buildings and Equipment

We did not find information regarding energy efficiency requirements for new public buildings. The city established an environmentally preferable procurement policy in 2010, but we could not confirm if it requires the purchase of ENERGY STAR– certified equipment.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Dubuque has an anti-idling policy for municipal vehicles (Administrative Policy 7.02) and other policies to consolidate travel (Administrative Policy 7.07).  We did not find information regarding fuel efficiency requirements for the public fleet and we did not identify any city-operated electric vehicle charging stations.

Public Lighting

Current traffic lights standards require the use of LEDs at new or reconstructed intersections.  Streetlights are scheduled to operate only when they are needed.

New Buildings and Equipment

Dubuque does not have energy efficiency requirements for new public buildings and we did not find information regarding energy efficiency procurement policies.

Last updated: October 2013

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

The General Services Department (GSD) adopted a policy to purchase hybrid or alternative-fuel vehicles whenever those options are available for a given class of vehicles. The city has a goal to decrease the baseline number of fleet vehicles on the road by 20% from 2008 levels by 2015. As a vehicle is phased out or repaired, GSD reassesses the vehicle to make sure that it is the right size for the purpose. The city has also drafted an anti-idling policy for fleet vehicles and is educating new employees about anti-idling, right-sizing, carpooling, and driving efficiently.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

El Paso is a partner in the DOE High Performance Outdoor Lighting Accelerator whose aim is to demonstrate practical and effective best practices to accelerate the adoption of high-efficiency outdoor lighting and impose system-wide replacement processes at the municipal level. El Paso has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. As of September 2014, the city has converted 8,200 of its streetlights to LEDs and has begun a program to retrofit another 10,600 by June 2015. Outdoor lighting is scheduled so it operates only when needed.

New Buildings and Equipment

El Paso does not have energy efficiency requirements for new public buildings. The city does not have energy efficiency or lifecycle cost considerations within its product procurement policies.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

When reviewing vehicle requests, the city encourages the use of smaller more fuel efficient vehicles, but Fort Worth does not have a fuel efficiency requirement for its vehicle fleet. The Equipment Services Department conducts an Underutilized Vehicle Study annually and conducts meetings when needed to review vehicles that should be removed from the fleet for age and low use. There are no energy-efficient vehicle procurement policies in place in the city of Fort Worth. However, this city does incorporate GPS technologies to increase public fleet efficiency.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

The city of Fort Worth has not yet adopted the control provisions of the Model Lighting Ordinance; however, it does have a program to replace burned out street light fixtures with new LEDs.

New Buildings and Equipment

Fort Worth’s Action Plan calls for a policy requiring new city buildings to be LEED Silver–certified (or better) when the certification cost does not exceed 5% of the construction cost, but we do not know if the policy has been adopted. We also could not confirm if the requirements specifically emphasized completion of the energy efficiency elements of the certification. Major renovations must also obtain LEED EB Silver certification or better when the cost of certification does not exceed 5% of the renovation cost. We did not find information on energy efficiency procurement policies.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

We did not find information regarding fuel efficiency requirements for the public fleet. We also did not find information on a fleet right-sizing policy, culling requirements, anti-idling policy for fleet vehicles, or other policies to encourage the efficient use of the public fleet.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if Hartford has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance.

New Buildings and Equipment

We did not find information regarding energy efficiency requirements for new public buildings or efficiency requirements in the city’s procurement policy.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Houston does not have a fuel efficiency requirement for its vehicle fleet. Approximately 50% of the city’s non-specialty, light-duty fleet has been replaced with hybrid vehicles and the city has 27 Nissan LEAFs and 15 plug-in hybrids in its fleet, although it is unclear if the vehicle replacements were due to formalized policy. The city started Houston Fleet Share through which 50 city-owned fleet vehicles were outfitted with ZipCar’s proprietary car-sharing technology, which will help right-size the fleet. The city of Houston also uses an online system and GPS technology in approximately 2,000 public vehicles but we were not able to confirm if this technology is actually used to increase public fleet efficiency.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Houston has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. CenterPoint Energy, in partnership with Houston, will convert approximately 165,000 streetlights from high pressure sodium, mercury vapor and metal halide to LED technology. This replacement project will reduce the city’s streetlight energy usage by approximately 50% and save the city over $28 million over the life of the project. Streetlights have photo sensors so they only operate when needed.

New Buildings and Equipment

The city has a green building policy that sets a target of LEED Silver certification for new construction, replacement facilities, and major renovations of city-owned or -funded buildings and facilities with more than 10,000 square feet of occupied space, but the policy does not emphasize energy points specifically. Administrative Procedure 7-1 City Energy Efficiency Policy (Section 7.2.7 Equipment Purchasing) specifies that all purchases of equipment, appliances, and computers should be ENERGY STAR– rated when feasible.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Executive Order 6 of 2012 calls for all new city vehicles to be electric/hybrid, with the exception of police vehicles, and for the entire fleet to be converted by 2025. Indianapolis’s Vehicle and Equipment Idling Reduction Policy prohibits city vehicles from idling for more than five minutes except in case of emergency. 

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Indianapolis has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, Under the 2015 City of Indianapolis Consolidated Zoning/Subdivision Ordinance, Section 744 Article VI provides updated lighting standards that work to minimize light glare and light trespass. The updated ordinance requires all street lights to be fitted with a full cutoff fixture and lighting while all lighting surrounding pedestrian entrances must be controlled with a photoelectric switch, motion sensor control, or astronomic time switch so these light sources are not left on indefinitely. Currently, there are no lighting replacement programs underway in the city of Indianapolis.

New Buildings and Equipment

In 2008, Governor Daniels signed Executive Order 08-14 (EO) requiring all new state buildings earn LEED Silver certification, the EPA Energy Star rating, two Globes under the Green Globes rating system or equivalent under an ANSI accredited rating system. Furthermore, the EO requires that all repairs or renovations of existing state buildings must follow LEED, Green Globes, or other guidelines. Nevertheless,

It is unclear if the city has adopted a procurement policy with energy efficiency requirements for its local government operations.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Executive Order 2008-3 established a policy that light-duty vehicles in need of replacement be replaced with hybrids or alternative-fuel vehicles, or the most fuel-efficient and least-polluting vehicles available, whenever cost and reliability are similar to traditional vehicles. Jacksonville does not have any other fuel efficiency requirements for its vehicle fleet. The executive order also established an anti-idling policy for the city fleet. Jacksonville is currently developing a right-sizing policy for their fleet as well, but it is not yet in place.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Jacksonville has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. JEA, the municipal electric and water utility, is in the process of conducting a study to determine the feasibility of LED outdoor lighting for the City of Jacksonville.

New Buildings and Equipment

Executive Order 2008-3 states that all applicable new city buildings and major renovations should be built and certified to the appropriate LEED standards and achieve ENERGY STAR certification. The order also states that existing buildings should incorporate all appropriate LEED-EB principles into facility operation and maintenance. The city also uses an environmentally preferable purchasing policy.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Kansas City does not have specific fuel efficiency requirements for the city fleet, however, it does have a procurement policy that incorporates lifecycle assessments and third party certifiers in its vehicle procurement processes.  Additionally, Kansas City uses two fleet tracking technology systems, Drive Cam and Location Technologies, nevertheless, we were not able to confirm if these systems are actually used to increase public fleet efficiency.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Kansas City has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, there are outdoor lighting standards in place intended to protect the public health and general welfare by controlling the adverse impacts of glare and light trespass associated with poorly shielded or inappropriately directed lighting fixtures. Although Kansas City does not have a written policy for outdoor lighting replacement or upgrade, the City has converted one hundred percent (100%) of Traffic Signals to LED. The City is now working on street light conversion to LED. Streetlights are scheduled, so they only operate when needed.

New Buildings and Equipment

In accordance with Ordinance 110235, all new municipal facilities and renovations impacting over 5,000 square feet of municipal space are required to meet LEED Gold standards. Kansas City’s current procurement policy does not contain energy efficiency requirements.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Knoxville’s Green Fleet Policy requires the city to consider vehicle fuel efficiency when making purchases.  Right-sizing and anti-idling provisions for the municipal fleet are also included in the Green Fleet Policy.  The city has installed 24 electric-vehicle charging stations that are also open to the public.

Public Lighting

Knoxville has an agreement with the Knoxville Utilities Board (KUB) that streetlighting retrofits and new construction include LEDs.  All of the city’s traffic lights have been retrofitted with LEDs. Streetlights are scheduled to operate for only the hours needed.

New Buildings and Equipment

Knoxville’s building construction policy requires all new municipal construction to meet ENERGY STAR or LEED certification. Knoxville developed the Green Purchasing Guide, which city government must adhere to, that recommends buying sustainable products when feasible and fiscally prudent.

Last updated: October 2015

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Las Vegas does not have fuel efficiency requirements for the public fleet. Nevertheless, the city has converted more than 95% of its non-emergency fleet to fuel efficient vehicles. The city does not have a formal energy-efficient vehicle procurement policy and it does not employ technologies to increase public fleet efficiency.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if Las Vegas has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, this city has adopted regional standards set forth by the Regional Transportation Commission, which mirror the industry American National Standards Institute/ Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (ANSI/IESNA) to upgrade nearly 80% of its streetlight inventory to LED. Energy-efficient streetlights was recognized by the city as the next key component to attaining the city’s energy savings. Las Vegas began a streetlight replacement program in 2013.

New Buildings and Equipment

As a part of the Green Building Resolution, adopted by the city council in 2006, the city constructs and upgrades all new or existing facilities to LEED Silver standards. The city has a Sustainable Purchasing Policy and a Sustainable Contracting policy that encourages staff to purchase ENERGY STAR products.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Lawrence does not have a vehicle procurement policy that includes energy efficiency requirements, but the city does have installed GPS units in vehicles to improve efficiency in routing.  Lawrence installed one electric-vehicle charging station that can also be used by the public. 

Public Lighting

Lawrence does not have efficiency requirements for public outdoor lighting, but the city has converted all of traffic lights to LEDs and has added LEDs sidewalk lights.  Streetlights are scheduled to operate only when they are needed.

New Buildings and Equipment

Lawrence does not have energy efficiency requirements for new public buildings.  The City Manager’s Office and the Finance Department are in the process of re-writing the city’s environmental procurement policy to incorporate energy-efficiency products.  

Last updated: October 2015

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Los Angeles has a policy, started in 2007, to replace fleet vehicles with the most efficient vehicles available at the time of purchase. As of 2014, 87% of the light duty fleet was hybrid or EV. As part of the Los Angeles Clean Cities Program, the city committed to increasing its fleet of alternative fuel vehicles by an average of 15% each year. Additionally, the City has a requirement that 50% of all new light duty vehicle purchases be full battery electric vehicles (BEVs). This requirement was to begin in 2017 but was met a year early in 2016. The other 50% may be regular hybrids, but departments are encouraged to get plug in hybrids. The 2025 goal is for 80% of all new procurement to be full BEV. Moreover, most of the city fleets take advantage of some variety of telematics with GPS integrated into the vehicle in order to increase their efficiency.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Los Angeles has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, the City’s Bureau of Street lighting has been replacing streetlights with LEDs and light sensors since 2008 through the LED Streetlight Replacement Program. Over 80% of streetlights have been replaced. The lights automatically turn on and off at nightfall and daybreak.

New Buildings and Equipment

The 2009 Green Building Ordinance (Ordinance 180633) requires public buildings of more than 7,500 square feet or those built prior to 1978 to be retrofitted to meet LEED Silver requirements. The city also adopted an environmentally preferable purchasing policy (Ordinance 180751), which includes an energy efficiency consideration.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

We did not find information regarding fuel efficiency requirements for the public fleet. Nevertheless, this City uses GPS technology to increase the efficiency of their public fleet, the technology has been installed in 21% of the fleet.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if Louisville has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. The street lights are not owned by Louisville Metro Government; they are owned by the private utility.

New Buildings and Equipment

Louisville does not have currently have energy efficiency requirements for new public buildings or efficiency requirements in the city’s procurement policy.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Madison’s Policy for the Acquisition of Energy Efficient and Safe Vehicles details energy efficiency requirements for future fleet purchases.  The policy also includes right-sizing and anti-idling policies within the policy.  Madison has worked with MGE to install ten electric-vehicle charging stations in city parks and parking ramps.

Public Lighting

We did not have find information regarding efficiency requirements for public outdoor lighting, but Madison has retrofitted parking lots and some streetlights (those not owned by the local utility).  Streetlight do have photo sensors so they only operate when necessary.

New Buildings and Equipment

The Madison Common Council passed a resolution that requires all new and remodeled buildings to meet LEED Silver standards and the city’s Design Guidelines emphasize energy efficiency.  Madison’s Policy for the Procurement & Disposal of Electronic Products and Policy for the Purchase of Printers, Faxes, Copiers, Paper, and Toner both require the city to take energy efficiency into account when making purchases.      

Last updated: October 2013

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Memphis does not have specific fuel efficiency requirements for its public fleet. However, in late 2014, the Memphis Bioworks Foundation completed an inventory of public fleets in the Memphis area and created a plan for gradual replacement of the existing fleet with alternatively fueled and energy efficient vehicles. The plan is scheduled to begin operating in the city of Memphis this coming year. Currently, only the Shelby County incorporates GPS technologies to increase public fleet efficiency in this city.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Memphis has not yet adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. Streetlights are operated by the local electricity utility, MLGW, and are scheduled to operate only during the hours when they are needed. There are currently no programs for outdoor lighting replacement in this city.

New Buildings and Equipment

Memphis does not have above-code requirements for municipal buildings or publicly funded buildings. The Sustainably Shelby Plan has a goal to revise procurement policies to include consideration of lifetime cost of goods, services, and equipment, but it is unclear if the policies have been revised yet.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Miami’s Green Fleet Ordinance (City Code Section 22.5) requires fuel efficiency to be considered during city vehicle purchases. The policy also calls for optimizing fleet size by eliminating unnecessary vehicles.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if Miami has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance.

New Buildings and Equipment

Per the Miami 21 Zoning Code (Section 3.13.1), buildings over 50,000 square feet are required to achieve LEED Silver certification. In 2008, the city passed a green purchasing ordinance for all city departments that requires products to meet ENERGY STAR guidelines.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Milwaukee has 46 hybrid passenger vehicles in its fleet and is planning to add more hybrid vehicles, but we could not confirm if the local government has fuel efficiency requirement in place for its public fleet. City staff who do not need much equipment drive compact vehicles, many of which are hybrid and compressed natural gas vehicles. This city has no energy-efficient vehicle procurement policy in place. We could not confirm if this city uses web-based tools or GPS technologies to increase public fleet efficiency.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Milwaukee has not yet adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. Although there is no formal replacement program in place, Milwaukee has replaced 2% of their streetlights with LEDs. The city won a $10,000 award from the Wisconsin State Energy Office to install 54 LED streetlights which will replace the HPS currently in use. Streetlights are timed to operate only when necessary.

New Buildings and Equipment

Milwaukee does not have energy efficiency requirements for new public buildings. The city requires ENERGY STAR for new appliance purchases.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Minneapolis does not have formal fuel efficiency requirements for their vehicles or energy-efficient vehicle procurement policies in place. However, the Green Fleet Policy requires the city to make every effort to obtain the vehicles that are the most efficient and emit the lowest levels of pollutants possible as measured by available emissions certification standards and standards published by manufacturers. In addition, the city’s Green Fleets Policy includes policies for optimizing city fleet size. Moreover, the city implements Network Fleet, a web-based tracking system aimed at increasing the efficiency and safety of its fleet

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Although the City of Minneapolis does not have an efficiency requirement in place, the city has an outdoor lighting replacement and upgrade program. The first phase of this replacement program, is high-wattage street lighting because it has been deemed the most cost-effective. At this point, approximately 14% of the city-owned high-wattage street lights have been replaced. Most streetlights operate on photo sensors.

New Buildings and Equipment

Resolution 2006R-381 calls for the city to utilize LEED standards in the planning, design, construction, and commissioning of municipal facilities financed by the city and utilized by the city’s charter departments. All new or significantly renovated municipal facilities (financed by the City of Minneapolis and utilized by the city’s Charter Departments) of 5,000 square feet or greater must be built to a LEED Silver standards with emphasis in LEED points in the category of Energy and Atmosphere. Requirements do not apply to publicly funded projects. The city’s Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Policy calls for procurement of ENERGY STAR appliances where available.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Metro Nashville does not have formal fuel efficiency requirements for their vehicles or energy-efficient vehicle procurement policies ni place. Nashville However, 100% of Metro fleet has been converted to flex-fuel, hybrid, electric or CNG. Additionally, 3% of heavy fleet is electric, hybrid or CNG.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Nashville has not yet adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. Although this city has no formal lighting replacement program in place, Nashville has partnered with Nashville Electric Service to pilot LED fixtures from several manufacturers.  The city has also installed LED pedestrian streetlights, traffic signals and way finding kiosks throughout the city.  

New Buildings and Equipment

As per the Metro LEED Ordinance, Nashville requires all new and renovations of public projects 5,000 square feet or greater to be built to LEED Silver certification, and all city-funded construction projects to complete a LEED scorecard. We did not find information regarding efficiency requirements in the city’s procurement policy.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

New Orleans does not have specific fuel efficiency requirements for the city fleet and does not have right-sizing policies or anti-idling policies for the city fleet.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if New Orleans has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. New Orleans has begun an outdoor lighting replacement program for publicly-owned lighting. All streetlights have photo sensors, so they only operate from dawn to dusk.

New Buildings and Equipment

New Orleans does not have energy efficiency requirements for public buildings and energy efficiency requirements are not included in the local government procurement policy.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

New York City has legislated fuel efficiency for public fleet vehicles, Local Law 38 of 2005 requires that the most fuel efficient vehicles in class for light and medium duty units be purchased; Local Law 76 of 2013 requires the City to achieve specific benchmarks in improving the fuel economy of City owned vehicles;  Local Law 73 of 2013 requires that biodiesel be used in City fleet trucks and also that the City retrofit or replace fleet trucks without diesel particulate filters; and Local Law 75 of 2013 requires the City to report on actual fuel economy for City vehicles, as opposed to the manufacturer’s list fuel economy.   Additionally, as part of the NYC Clean Fleet initiative to reduce GHG emissions by 50% by 2025, this city is planned to operate the largest EV fleet in the country at 2,000+ vehicles. The city has already purchased over 500 EV municipal vehicles. Furthermore, this city implemented a Clean Fleet Transition Policy (CFTP) as part of its published Fleet Management Manual and rules.  The CFTP requires that all vehicle replacements be as or more fuel efficient than the vehicle they will replace and that the Chief Fleet Officer approves any requests to replace any vehicle with a less fuel efficient version. As for web-based tracking technology, New York City uses NYC Fleet Focus which tracks all their vehicles in order to promote their efficient use. 

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if New York City has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, the city publishes a Street Design Manual, which includes a Lighting Catalogue, outlining options for both new and replacement street and pedestrian lighting for New York City. Additionally, the City of New York provides significant funding for lighting upgrades, including occupancy sensors, daylighting and other controls at City buildings.  To date over $63 Million has been allocated for lighting-related upgrades at municipal buildings. The Department of Transportation is currently retrofitting all of New York City's street lights with LEDs. By the end of 2017 all 250,000 standard street light fixtures in New York City are projected to be replaced. 

New Buildings and Equipment

New York City’s Local Laws 31 and 32 of 2016 require that projects receiving more than $2 million in city funding achieve a LEED Gold certification. The building requirements apply to new construction, building additions, and substantial reconstructions of existing buildings for all city-funded projects. Local Law 119 of 2005 requires the city to follow Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) standards of energy efficiency in the use and acquisition of energy-using products including those with an ENERGY STAR label.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

The city does not have fuel efficiency standards, however it did adopt the Green Fleet Resolution of 2003 which details commitments to address the operation, procurement and management of fleet vehicles in order to improve efficiency. Moreover, Oakland's street sweeping and solid waste vehicles have routes determined by software systems that incorporate GPS information.

Public Lighting

Oakland’s Outdoor Lighting Standards require good lighting design and energy efficiency. Its' guidelines are in accordance with the Illumination Engineering Society's lighting guidelines for all facilities. 

New Buildings and Equipment

The City's Green Building Ordinance requires LEED silver certification for all new municipal buildings. Additionally, Oakland's environemntal preferable purchasing policy requires purchases of energy-efficient equipment with the most up-to-date energy efficiency functions.

Updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Oklahoma City does not have formal fuel efficiency requirements for their vehicles or energy-efficient vehicle procurement policies in place. However, this city has vehicle purchasing guidelines that promote cost-effectiveness, fuel efficiency, and low emissions. This city has a web based fleet management system, however they are used for telematics, routing, and fencing, not to improve efficiency per se..

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Oklahoma City has not yet adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. There are no current efficiency-driven lighting replacement programs in this city.

New Buildings and Equipment

The city does not currently require new public buildings to be ENERGY STAR or LEED certified. However, the city currently has a sustainable purchasing policy that requires life cycle costs for purchases.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

The Municipal Operations Sustainability Plan has an objective to reduce the public fleet's fossil diesel and gasoline use by 25%  from 2010 levels by 2017. Additionally, the city of Orlando has set a municipal goal to run city fleet vehicles on 100% renewable sources by 2030. There are currently no web-based tools or GPS technologies to improve fleet efficiency in this city.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Orlando passed a lighting ordinance in 2014 for public outdoor lighting. As an alternative to the development standard, lighting that conforms to the Joint International Dark-Sky Association and Illuminating Engineering Society Model Lighting Ordinance is also acceptable. Orlando has also installed over 20,000 LED streetlight in the city in collaboration with the utility, Orlando Utilities Commission. There are no formal efficiency-driven lighting replacement programs in this city, however some lighting replacements are being prioritized as part of its 7-year payback period equipment upgrading policy.

New Buildings and Equipment

Orlando has a policy that new municipal buildings achieve LEED certification, but we could not confirm if the requirements specifically emphasize completion of the energy efficiency elements of the certification. The city of Orlando requires that all appliances procured must meet Energy Star specifications.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Park City has a policy to review fleet vehicle purchases with the following categories in mind: fuel efficiency, emissions, upfront and lifecycle costs, safety, and operational need.  City staff has developed a tool that uses data from fueleconomy.gov to determine the most appropriate choice in each vehicle class.  Park City also has an anti-idling policy for the municipal vehicle fleet and the same policy dictates that managers are responsible for ensuring efficient driving practices are used by employees.  We did not identify any city-operated electric vehicle charging stations.

Public Lighting

Park City does not have efficiency requirements for public outdoor lighting, but city staff incorporates energy efficient lighting (including LEDs) into lighting replacement and new fixture projects.  Outdoor public lighting in main corridors is operated via a photo sensor so it only operates when needed.

New Buildings and Equipment

Municipal buildings as well as city-funded and managed projects must meet the requirements of the city’s green building policy, but we could not find information indicating that any additional specific standards for energy efficiency are included in the policy.  Park City’s internal purchasing policy requires the city to purchase products and equipment that meet ENERGY STAR certification when possible.

Last updated: October 2015

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

According to Greenworks, Philadelphia has a goal to increase fuel efficiency generally in its fleet. The city replaced 70% of the police fleet with more fuel-efficient vehicles in 2009 and 2010. The city has reduced its vehicle fleet by 500 vehicles since Greenworks was first established in 2009. Also, the local government supports 500 users for PhillycarShare, which reduces overall driving by city employees.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Philadelphia has not yet adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. Outdoor lighting is scheduled. This city currently replaces broken or non-functioning streetlights with high-efficiency LED bulbs, 2.5% of citywide lighting is highly efficient. Philadelphia and PECO are exploring a partnership to expedite the citywide deployment of LED lighting to improve efficiency and public safety.

New Buildings and Equipment

In December 2009, the city council passed Bill No. 080025 which calls for new construction and major renovations of more than 10,000 square feet of city government buildings to be certified as LEED Silver. To emphasize energy efficiency, the ordinance requires that projects be designed and constructed to use at least 20% less energy than code-compliant structures. The City of Philadelphia currently has an Executive Order in place to require ENERGY STAR purchasing where feasible, but it’s not clear if it is being applied in a consistent manner. The Office of Sustainability and the Procurement Department are working on a citywide purchasing strategy to incorporate life-cycle costs into future standards.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Phoenix does not have formal fuel efficiency requirements for their vehicles or energy-efficient vehicle procurement policies in place. However, the Public Works Department uses the Environmental Protection Agencies (EPA) SmartWay Vehicle program as a guide when purchasing light duty vehicle.  EPA's SmartWay program certifies the top 20% lowest-emitting cars and trucks for each model year. Additionally, the City is currently reviewing their light duty fleet to determine what type and how many electric, plug-in hybrid and electric hybrid vehicles the City could be incorporated. The city of Phoenix currently implements GPS technology to increase the efficiency of their public fleet.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if Phoenix has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, the city has already replaced 100% of its traffic signals with LED, and its council is studying a $25M retrofit program to replace 100% of streetlights with LEDs. The program was projected to start in the fall of 2016.  Public outdoor lighting is scheduled.

New Buildings and Equipment

Phoenix's building standards were revised in 2006 to include additional energy-related standards for city-funded projects. The revisions supplement requirement of LEED Silver certification, requiring landscape and exterior designs that reduce urban heat islands. When compared to the requirements of the federal Energy Policy Act of 1992, buildings are required to use 50% less water in landscaping, 20% less water in interiors, and 30% less overall energy. The city has environmentally preferable purchasing requirements including purchase of ENERGY STAR–rated products.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Pittsburgh’s Fleet Acquisition Agency has a Green Vehicle Purchasing Policy since 2008.  This policy specifies that when purchasing a public fleet vehicle, the Board of Directors of the Equipment Leasing Authority shall require that all new vehicles and accessory equipment purchased for municipal use be the safest, most fuel-efficient and “green” vehicle in the applicable class required for the job.  There are no current energy efficient vehicle procurement policies in place in the city of Pittsburgh. As for vehicle tracking technology, this city

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Pittsburgh adopted an ordinance in 2011 that requires efficient outdoor lighting and includes cut-off, uplight, and glare specifications. Additionally, in 2014 changes to the lighting code were made to allow the placement of LEDs in parking garages.  During the first phase of their LED installation program , the city purchased and installed 3,500 new LED streetlights in the business corridor and city operated athletic fields, the second phase of this program has already started and it is planned to finish with the remaining 36,500 lighting replacements in residential corridors. The lighting includes controls to activate and deactivate lighting as needed.

New Buildings and Equipment

The city requires that all publicly financed development of more than $2 million or 10,000 square feet or renovations totaling more than $2 million to attain a minimum of LEED Silver rating. The city uses environmentally preferable purchasing guidelines, which include energy efficiency stipulations.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Portland has enacted several policies to encourage efficient vehicle procurement and operation. The city’s fleet service has a policy of purchasing the most efficient vehicle that meets work requirements. The city has also set a goal to convert 20% of the city’s fleet to electric vehicles by 2030. As of July 2016, 20% of EV-eligible vehicles were electric.  Additionally, The City of Portland currently utilizes onboard fuel system telematics and has GPS installed on over 600 vehicles to improve efficiency in their use.  

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Portland has not yet adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, the standard practice in this city has been to install photo-electric relay for all street lights that turn off the lights when sufficient day light is available. Portland's 1990 Energy Policy established the requirement to implement energy measures with simple paybacks of ten years or less, which has led to various roadway and traffic lighting retrofits. Conversion of all Portland streetlights to LEDs is now underway; 41,000 cobra head street lights, approximately 75% of the total number, have been successfully converted. Portland is also a founding member of the DOE-sponsored Municipal Solid State Lighting Consortium to exchange technical data, design, product research, and pricing of LEDs among city owned streetlight systems. Streetlights are activated via photo sensors so they only operate from dawn to dusk. 

New Buildings and Equipment

In accordance with the Green Building Policy, new City-owned buildings are require to be registered and certified for LEED BD+C at the Gold level and/or achieve Living Building Challenge status.  Additionally, existing, city-owed, and occupied buildings are required to achieve to achieve LEED-EB Silver, and all tenant improvements or leased facilties must achieve LEED for Commercial Interiors at the Silver rating and/ G/Rated Tenant Improvement Guide certification. The LEED certifications require 15% energy savings beyond the applicable Oregon Energy Efficiency Specialty Code. The city's Sustainable Procurement Policy calls for the city to procure products that meet or exceed ENERGY STAR criteria for energy efficiency where available. 

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

In accordance with the City Code (Chapter II, Article I, Sec. 2-12), when the city purchases motor vehicles for its municipal operations, each vehicle purchased must be the most fuel-efficient model available that will fulfill the intended municipal function. Otherwise, we did not find information on a fleet right-sizing policy, culling requirements, tracking technology or other policies or tools focused at encouraging the efficient use of the public fleet.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if Providence has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. This city purchased its streetlighting from the utility company in February of 2015, and hired a third party to retrofit the entire system, including floodlighting, to LED technology, and incorporate open-portal controls for dimming. Additionally, The City’s new LED streetlighting and controls management company will be remotely dimming streetlighting City-wide between the hours of 11 pm and 5 am. All streetlights have photo sensors, so they only operate from dawn to dusk.

New Buildings and Equipment

Providence requires new muncipal construction and major renovation projects to meet LEED Silver certification. Energy efficiency requirements are not included in the local government procurement policy.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Raleigh does not have formal fuel efficiency requirements for their public fleet vehicles. However, in 2007 Raleigh City Council established a goal of reducing fossil fuel consumption by 20 percent from 2006 levels for the city fleet. Additionally, the city has a policy to promote the purchase or lease of the most energy efficient vehicles possible that meet the needs of the department for which the vehicles are intended. Moreover, around 30% of the city’s public fleet is equipped with GPS technology to increase efficiency in its use. 

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if Raleigh has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, the city has established light and noise pollution controls that seek to minimize light pollution, glare, light trespass; conserve energy and resources while maintaining night time safety, utility, security, and productivity; and curtail the degradation of the night-time visual environment. In 2015 the city partnered with Duke Energy Progress to replace approximately 30,000 streetlights within city limits and install energy-saving LED fixtures in their place. Approximately 99 percent of the leased street light system has been upgraded with energy efficient LED fixtures. 

New Buildings and Equipment

Raleigh’s City Council adopted as policy the Environmental Advisory Board's recommendations on LEED (or the equivalent) certification for municipal buildings on May 20, 2008. The policy states that all new City of Raleigh construction and additions encompassing 10,000 gross square feet or more of building area should achieve a Silver level certification of the US Green Building Council's LEED Green Building Rating System for New Construction (LEED-NC). Nevertheless, we could not confirm if these requirements specifically emphasize completion of the energy efficiency elements of the certification. This city’s procurement policy does include energy efficiency and lifecycle cost considerations.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Richmond does not have efficiency requirements for the city fleet, but the city is developing policies to encourage more efficient vehicle use. Richmond does not employ web-based, GPS technology for fleet management.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if Richmond has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, all Richmond streetlights have photo sensors, and only operate from dawn to dusk.

We also could not confirm if Richmond has started an outdoor lighting replacement program. All streetlights have photo sensors, so they only operate from dawn to dusk.

New Buildings and Equipment

In accordance with Richmond’s City Council Resolution 2015-R008-15, all new and renovated municipal buildings over 10,000 square feet are required to meet LEED Silver standards. Richmond has a Green and Sustainable Purchasing Policy that encourages “environmentally preferable” products, however we could not confirm that this policy incorporates efficiency or life cycle cost considerations.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Riverside does not have formal fuel efficiency requirements for their vehicles or energy-efficient vehicle procurement policies in place. The city has a motorpool policy that requires employees to consider alternatives to driving before reserving a car vehicle. Riverside does not employ web-based, GPS technology for fleet management.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Riverside has not yet adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. The city has no efficiency focused lighting replacement program in place. Riverside has begun replacing the street signage from lighted signage to high reflectivity option, negating the need to use electricity at all. Lights are on timers to only run during the times in which they are needed.

New Buildings and Equipment

Riverside’s does not have a LEED standards based policy for municipal facilities, however, the city does strive to meet minimum LEED requirements without going through the formal LEED certification process. Energy efficiency isincluded in the city’s environmentally preferable purchasing policy.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

The Fleet Sustainability and Fuel Conservation Policy’s (detailed in Administrative Policy Instructions No. 57) purchasing guidelines emphasize considering best fuel economy and lowest emissions in vehicle class in purchase decisions. The policy’s vehicle operations guidelines encourage vehicle trip reductions, the use of GPS for routing, reduced idling, and fleet right-sizing.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if Sacramento has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. As of late 2009, the city had commenced a pilot project to convert streetlights to LEDs.

New Buildings and Equipment

The city’s green building policy (Resolution 2004-751) requires city facilities to achieve the highest LEED rating, with an emphasis on energy efficiency. Life-cycle costing must be utilized to determine the best selection of features and components for new buildings. For buildings 5,000 square feet and larger, the goal is a minimum of LEED Silver certification. The Sustainable Operations Policy (detailed in Administrative Policy Instructions No. 57) includes the requirement to purchase ENERGY STAR appliances when practical.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Salt Lake City does not have formal fuel efficiency requirements for their vehicles or energy-efficient vehicle procurement policies in place. However, the city’s fleet of heavy-duty vehicles employ the use of GPS Insight technology to track their location and improve efficiency in their use.  

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if Salt Lake City has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. The city has begun a long-term program to convert all streetlights to high efficiency fixtures over the next 15 years. All streetlights are controlled by either photo sensors or time clocks so they only operate when needed.

New Buildings and Equipment

January 2006 executive order requires municipal buildings be built or renovated to LEED-silver standards. In accordance with a January 2013 executive order, all new and majorly renovated municipal government buildings over 10,000 square feet are to be evaluated for the potential to meet net-zero energy emissions standards. If feasible and cost-effective, the building will be designed and built to that level of energy efficiency. The city’s Environmental Policy requires the city to purchase environmental preferable products and to purchase energy efficient electrical products that perform in the upper 25th percentile of the market for each product class when available and cost effective.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

San Antonio’s environmental fleet policy (City Ordinance 2010-04-15-0335) includes a directive to calculate the total cost of ownership when a vehicle purchase is considered and establishes a target of a 17% reduction in emissions by 2020. We did not find information regarding right-sizing policies or anti-idling policies.  

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if San Antonio has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. San Antonio's municipal utility has entered into an outdoor lighting replacement contract. When the upgrade is complete in Summer 2015, 25,000 streetlights will have been replaced with LEDs.

New Buildings and Equipment

In 2007, the city council adopted a green building policy (Resolution 2007R-04-19-0416) to require that all new buildings funded and used by the city must meet green building guidelines based on LEED Silver criteria, but the requirements do not specifically emphasize completion of the energy efficiency elements of the certification. The city also has an environmentally preferable procurement policy for equipment purchasing decisions.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Current policy (Administrative Regulation 90.73) calls for all new vehicles to be 50% better than CAFE standards by 2020 and for a 5% reduction in vehicle miles traveled compared to the previous year. The policy also calls for operating all vehicles in a manner that ensures maximum fuel conservation including keeping tires inflated to the recommended pressure, using air conditioning selectively, and minimizing public vehicle idling. Additionally, this policy commits the city to investigate the benefit, availability and use of lower carbon fuels, low emission & zero emission vehicles, including but not limited to Super Ultra Low Emission Vehicles, Partial Zero Emission Vehicles, and Zero Emission Vehicles such as electric vehicles. Moreover, the city of San Diego does incorporate web-based GPS technologies to increase the efficiency of their public fleet.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

San Diego has a streetlighting and outdoor lighting ordinance (Ordinance 20186 passed in July 2012) requiring efficient outdoor lighting. Recently replaced streetlights are connected to photo sensors for dusk to dawn operation. Additionally, the city of San Diego has an outdoor lighting replacement and upgrade program. The city replaced 35,311 sodium-vapor streetlights with energy-efficient, broad-spectrum induction streetlights in a citywide effort in 2013. The city’s Street Division maintains over 40,000 street lights so in 2013, 88% of the city’s streetlights were updated.

New Buildings and Equipment

Among the directives of San Diego’s Sustainable Building Policy (Council Policy 900-14) there is a commitment that all new city-funded facilities and major building renovation projects (more than 5,000 square feet) achieve LEED Silver certification and be constructed to be 15% more energy efficient than California's building code. The city has an environmentally preferable purchasing policy for equipment purchasing decisions (Administrative Regulation 35.80) that includes provisions for resource efficiency, including energy efficiency.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

San Francisco does not have fuel efficiency requirements for the public fleet. In accordance with the Healthy Air and Clean Transportation Ordinance, through July 1, 2015, each city official with jurisdiction over passenger vehicles and light-duty trucks must remove at least 5% of vehicles from his or her fleet annually. Beginning on July 1, 2015, city officials must remove all vehicles aged 12 years and older from the fleet. All city fleet vehicle purchases must comply with the San Francisco Transit-First Policy.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if San Francisco has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. As part of the LED Streetlight Conversion Project, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission has started replacing approximately 18,500 City-owned, high pressure sodium cobra-head style streetlight fixtures throughout the city with ultra-efficient LED fixtures.

New Buildings and Equipment

Section 705 of the Environment Code requires LEED Gold certification for all new municipal construction and major alteration projects of 5,000 square feet or more in city-owned facilities and city leaseholds, and it also requires that the project demonstrates either 1) a 25% compliance margin over Title 24, Part 6, 2008 California Energy Standards, or 2) a 15% compliance margin over Title 24, Part 6, 2008 California Energy Standards, combined with at least 1% of the building's energy costs offset by onsite renewable energy generation. The city’s green purchasing policy is updated every three years and includes energy efficiency considerations.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

San Jose does not have specific fuel efficiency requirements for the public fleet. However, for all replacement vehicles, San José’s Green Fleet policy has emission reduction targets. Additionally, the city has a goal to replace 100% of the public fleet with alternative fuel vehicles by 2022. San Jose does not employ web-based, GPS technology for fleet management.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if San Jose has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. Nevertheless, the Public Streetlight Design Guide, adopted in February 2011, has a goal to replace 100% of streetlights with zero-emission lighting. .  To date approximately 37% of the City’s streetlights have been converted to LEDs with adaptive controls.

New Buildings and Equipment

The city’s green building policy (Policy 8-13) requires all municipal projects—including those receiving City funds—design, construct, and achieve at minimum LEED Silver certification. Energy efficiency is also included in the city’s environmentally preferable purchasing policy.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

The City of Seattle’s Green Fleet Action Plan requires 50% reduction in greenhouse gas pollution from a 2013 baseline across the municipal fleet by 2025. This action plan prioritizes electric vehicles where possible in addition to biofuels, advanced technology pilots, fleet right-sizing, driver behavior, and anti-idling efforts. Additionally, this city is currently reviewing their fleet procurement policies to develop a new Green Fleet Standard. Seattle’s field vehicles have GPS/AVL technology used by crew chiefs and crews to organize work assignments by location in the most efficient manner.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if Seattle has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, Seattle City Light has converted all of Seattle's residential streetlights from high-pressure sodium lights to LEDs. The replacement of all 41,000 residential streetlights was completed in 2013. The conversion of the city's 31,000 arterial lighting fixtures to LED was initiated in 2013 and 17,207 units have been completed as of mid-2016; this work will continue through 2018. Streetlights are activated by photo sensors.

New Buildings and Equipment

Seattle's sustainable building policy was adopted in 2000 and was significantly expanded in scope in October 2011. This policy calls for new city-funded projects and major renovations with more than 5,000 square feet of occupied space to achieve LEED Gold certification. In addition, these projects must be 15% more energy efficient and 30% more water efficient than code, achieve a 90% waste diversion rate, and provide bicycle facilities. Minor renovation and tenant-led improvement projects that impact 5,000 square feet or more and involve changes to mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems must also meet LEED Gold standards. Projects that are under 5,000 square feet or not eligible for LEED rating must complete the Seattle's Capital Green Toolkit . The city’s green purchasing policy mandates at least EPA product standards, including ENERGY STAR.

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

St. Louis does not have fuel efficiency requirements for the public fleet. St. Louis has a no-idling ordinance (Ordinance 68137) and telematics devices installed in 475 vehicles to improve efficiency and reduce fuel consumption. 

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if St. Louis has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. St. Louis is piloting three types of energy-efficient streetlight upgrades to determine which are the most reliable, efficient, and cost effective for future use.

New Buildings and Equipment

The Municipal LEED Standards Ordinance (Ordinance 67414) requires all new municipal construction and major renovations of more than 5,000 square feet to be built to LEED Silver standards. ENERGY STAR equipment is recommended for use by city departments, but departments are allowed to choose what to purchase.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Tampa does not have formal fuel efficiency requirements for their vehicles or energy-efficient vehicle procurement policies in place. Although this city is in the process of developing a technology based tracking program, currently there are no web-based GPS technologies available for fleet management.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

Tampa has not yet adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. A policy in Tampa’s Comprehensive Plan (Policy 40.1.7) calls for Tampa to pursue energy-saving options for exterior lighting of municipal buildings. Nevertheless, there are no formal efficiency focused lighting replacement programs in place in this city.

New Buildings and Equipment

Ordinance 17.5-203 requires all new construction of municipal buildings of at least 5,000 square feet to be built to LEED Silver standards. Renovations of existing municipal buildings must incorporate building materials recognized by the U.S. Green Building Council for their sustainable qualities and recycled products whenever possible. We did not find information regarding an energy efficiency procurement policy for equipment purchases.

Last updated: April 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Virginia Beach does not have formal fuel efficiency requirements for their vehicles or energy-efficient vehicle procurement policies in place . The city has dedicated funding to installing GPS systems in vehicles to optimize fleet use and performance. Currently there is GPS tracking on more than 500 vehicles including Public Safety and Public Utility vehicles.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if Virginia Beach has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. The city is currently installing LED street lights on roadway new construction projects..

New Buildings and Equipment

Virginia Beach has LEED requirements for local government buildings, but the requirements do not specifically emphasize completion of the energy efficiency elements of the certification. The city does have a Sustainability Procurement policy that includes energy efficiency provisions. 

Last updated: January 2017

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

The district requires newly purchased or leased fleet vehicles to be the maximum fuel efficiency, minimum size, and appropriate engine size necessary to meet operational needs (District Municipal Regulation, Title 27, Section 2116). The policy also limits the purchase of SUVs unless they are to be used for security, emergency, rescue, snow removal, or armored vehicles. The district’s anti-idling regulation (20 DCMR 900) applies to government-owned vehicles and limits idling to 3 minutes or less. The DC Fleet Share program is comprised of 85 government-owned vehicles and has resulted in reducing 360 passenger vehicles from the fleet, or 17% of the fleet’s passenger vehicles. The Department of Public Work’s (DPW) multiyear capital improvement plan establishes yearly goals for vehicle replacement set to attain maximum fuel efficiency and meet or exceed emissions standards, including goals to increase electric and hybrid vehicles.

Note: For local fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing fleet efficiency. Local alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if Washington has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. The District Department of Transportation (DDOT) is in the process of replacing all existing roadway and alley light fixtures with LED streetlight fixtures.

New Buildings and Equipment

The Green Building Act of 2006 requires that new city building designs earn an ENERGY STAR target finder score of at least 75 and that all city buildings 10,000 square feet and larger be ENERGY STAR– benchmarked annually. This policy applies to publicly funded buildings. New and major renovations of all city-owned commercial buildings must also be LEED certified at the silver level as a minimum, with schools being required to meet a minimum of LEED-Gold. City owned or financed residential new construction and major renovation projects must either be certified to Enterprise Green Communities or LEED.  DC's Procurement Practices Act was amended by the ENERGY STAR Efficiency Amendment Act of 2004 (Law 15-281), which directs agencies to include a specification that energy using products be ENERGY STAR– labeled provided those products are widely available.

Last updated: April 2017