State and Local Policy Database

Compliance

The American Recovery Act called for states to achieve 90% compliance with the ARRA minimum standard building energy code by 2017. A variety of methods exist to increase compliance with building codes. The Building Codes Awareness Project (BCAP) promotes conducting a gap analysis to assess current gaps and identify best practices, and the development of a strategic compliance plan with practical near- and long-term action items. States may also form collaboratives of stakeholders to support code education and training, or may establish a system through which utilities are encouraged to support code compliance.

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: In 2010, the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP) and the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) developed the Alabama Gap Analysis and an Implementation Action Kit. Alabama was also chosen as one of four states to receive energy codes compliance evaluation and implementation assistance through Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL). PNNL developed an Alabama Energy Code Compliance Evaluation and Implementation Guide.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: Alabama is one of eight states participating in the US DOE's Residential Energy Code Field Study, which includes an initial field study to be followed by 18 months of education and outreach, as well as follow-up data collection to determine the impacts of education on compliance. Alabama's initial compliance rates with the 2009 Alabama Energy and Residential Codes were at least 92%, prompting a re-analysis of savings potential based on the newly adopted 2015 Alabama Energy and Residential Codes.
  • Utility Involvement: There are no commission regulatory guidelines or mandates, but utilities are represented on the AERC Board and are actively involved in supporting energy code compliance through that process as well as education and outreach efforts through the Board and the State Energy Office.  Alabama Power also provides low or no-cost training to certify contractors to provide Duct and Envelope Tightness testing verification, as required effective January 1, 2014 under the Alabama Energy and Residential Code. 
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: The Alabama Energy Residential Code Board includes representatives from 17 different organizations with an interest in codes. Furthermore, the Project Team at the DOE Energy Codes Field Study, which is organized through the Institute for Market Transformation, has also served as a stakeholder group since the beginning of the project more than a year ago, helping to coordinate the Field Study efforts, reviewing results and helping to drive the education and outreach efforts based on those results. The members of this project team can be found here.
  • Training/Outreach: The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA) has been actively providing energy codes training for many years. Recent efforts include specific training on the new Alabama Energy and Residential Code targeted toward all building industry professionals as well as building and code officials and inspectors.  Over the next 18 months, additional trainings will be available through the DOE Residential Energy Code Field Study as well

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: BCAP chose Alaska to assist with the development of its gap analysis and a strategic plan, which were completed in late 2012.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: A database has been constructed to capture data on energy code compliance for all new homes. Analysis has not been made yet, but is planned for 2016-17.
  • Utility Involvement: N/A. No regulatory guidelines have been established with regard to involving utilities in supporting building energy code compliance. 
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: N/A
  • Training/Outreach: The Alaska Housing Finance Corporation has classes for contractors, building officials and others to train in compliance with the Alaska Building Energy Efficiency Standard. Training is offered to about 500 builders, inspectors, and energy raters on an annual basis.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: NA
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: NA
  • Utility Involvement: Four of Arizona's utilities are actively involved in code-related efforts. Up to 1/3 credit of savings from building energy codes can be claimed by utilities to count towards annual savings goals. Utilities must demonstrate and evaluate the savings that they claim.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: NA
  • Training/Outreach: The Governor’s Office of Energy Policy (GOEP) works with utilities, specifically Arizona Public Service and Salt River Project, on education related to energy efficiency codes. The utilities are allowed, per the state’s energy efficiency standards, to count the training towards their energy efficiency requirements. The Arizona Building Officials also sponsors workshops/trainings on codes throughout the year.

Last Updated: June 2016

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: The Building Codes Assistance Project conducted a gap analysis in 2010.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: Arkansas is one of eight states participating in the US DOE's Residential Energy Code Field Study. Through the project, DOE plans to establish a sufficient data set to represent statewide construction trends and detect significant changes in energy use from training, education and outreach activities. The first stage of the study is comprised of a baseline compliance study.
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: NA
  • Training/Outreach: Arkansas Energy Office (AEO) utilized Pulaski Technical College- Center of Excellence to conduct residential code training for builders, contractors, code officials and other building professionals. In addition, AEO also coordinated with the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) for training and outreach opportunities. For a listing of current training activities please visit the Arkansas Energy Office web site

Last Updated: June 2016

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC), in collaboration with the Energy Commission, adopted the state’s Long Term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan (“Strategic Plan”), presenting a single roadmap to achieve maximum energy savings across all major groups and sectors in California. This comprehensive Strategic Plan for 2009 to 2020 represents the state’s first integrated framework of goals and strategies for saving energy, covering government, utility, and private sector actions, and holds energy efficiency to its role as the highest priority resource in meeting California’s energy needs. The Strategic Plan established the Big Bold Energy Efficiency Strategies (BBEES), which call for all newly constructed residential buildings to be Zero Net Energy by 2020 and all newly constructed Commercial buildings by 2030. The Codes and Standards Action Plan and Zero Net Energy Action Plan add detail to the Strategic Plan.  In addition, the CPUC/IOUs on an ongoing basis conduct EM&V studies to investigate ways to improve compliance with the Standards. The IOU Compliance Enhancement Program developed a Best Practices report in 2012 based on a gap analysis of seven building departments.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: The CPUC completed evaluations of building energy code compliance for the 2006-2008 program cycle in 2010 and for the 2010-2012 cycle in 2014. Reports can be found on the CALMAC website (http://www.calmac.org/). 

    In October 2014 the CPUC completed the “Statewide Codes and Standards Program Impact Evaluation Report For Program Years 2010-2012.” In April 2015 BayREN completed the “BayREN Codes and Standards, Permit Resource Opportunity Program - PROP Final Report and Energy Code Resource Guide.” In January 2017 the CPUC completed the “Codes and Standards Compliance Improvement Program Years 2013-14 Process Evaluation.” The CPUC is in the final stages of the 2013-2015 Impact Evaluation. The “California Statewide Codes and Standards Program Impact Evaluation Report Volume Two: T-24 Building Standards,” which will assess compliance with the 2013 Building Energy Efficiency Standards is expected to be published in August 2017.

  • Utility Involvement: California codes are supported by IOU incentive and rebate programs. Besides utility incentive programs, they develop and deliver building energy code training to a variety of stakeholders including builders, building departments, trades people, engineers, and architects in support of increase compliance. Regulatory guidelines have been established in Public Resources Code §25402.7 requiring significant utility involvement in supporting building energy code compliance. The CPUC has authorized the IOUs to support standards development since the early 2000s. Since 2008, the CPUC has authorized the IOUs to claim savings from standards development activities and to specifically develop and implement actions to support compliance improvement and standards implementation.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: The Energy Commission participates with several collaborative stakeholder groups and organizations that focus on improving code compliance throughout the state. These groups include the Compliance Improvement Advisory Group, the Western HVAC Performance Alliance Compliance Committee, the Bay Area Regional Energy Network Codes and Standards Program, In addition the Commission participates with the California Building Officials (CALBO) statewide professional organization, and with International Code Council (ICC) regional chapters around the state. BayREN is the San Francisco Bay Area Regional Energy Network that was established by Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG). BayREN is composed of county-level public agencies representing ABAG’s nine-county region and half the population of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company service territory.  BayREN has chosen to focus efforts on Building Standards compliance improvement throughout their region.  In 2014 BayREN initiated the 2014 Permit Resource Opportunity Program (PROP)to engage the scores of Building Departments in their territory to understand and develop approaches to address building department specific and regionwide barriers to Standards implementation.
  • Training/Outreach: 

    The Energy Commission conducts extensive outreach and education to assist local building departments in enforcing and the industry in complying with the Building Energy Efficiency Standards.  Such efforts included: developing and providing in-person training at California Building Official (CALBO) education events, International Code Council (ICC) chapter meetings, California Association of Building Energy Consultants (CABEC) annual events, American Institute of Architects (AIA) chapter meetings, International Association of Electrical Inspectors (IAEI) meetings, Associated Lighting Representatives (ALR) meetings, and the Institute of Heating and Air Conditioning Industries (IHACI) meetings.

    New efforts on behalf of the Energy Commission for this past year included developing 2016 Energy Standards tools and resources to help simplify compliance and enforcement of the Energy Standards, including the development of the new user-friendly Online Resource Center (ORC) and the production of educational videos on the requirements for lighting and residential HVAC systems and controls; and, providing technical support to utilities' Energy Code Ace by reviewing their newly developed 2016 Energy Standards tools/resources and promoting utility funded training on the Energy Standards. 

    Under the Energy Code Ace brand (http://energycodeace.com/) the California IOUs’ Compliance Improvement Program provides online tools and training to market actors throughout the Building Energy Efficiency Standards compliance industry.  Targeted market actors include: plans examiners and building inspectors, energy consultants, architects and designers, lighting designers and installers, HVAC contractors, and appliance manufacturers, distributors, and retailers. In 2016, Energy Code Ace added a new traditional class for architects, a new on-line self-study course covering the Water-Energy Nexus, and hosted and recorded “Test, Certify and Comply,” an online event focusing on the high efficacy residential lighting requirements in Title 24, Part 6 Joint Appendix 8. Also, all existing curriculum and supporting materials under the Energy Code Ace brand were updated to reflect California’s new code cycle which became effective 1/1/17.

    The Energy Commission’s budget for building code compliance, enforcement and training and outreach was $3.2 million.  The IOU Statewide Codes and Standards Program budget was approximately $2 million.  The BayREN’s budget was $461,000.

  • The Energy Commission, IOUs and other stakeholders conduct ongoing training and outreach throughout the state.  In combination, these collaborating organizations each year provide hundreds of in-person training sessions on Standards requirements and compliance options, compliance software, building department plan review and site inspection, and HERS rater field verification to increase compliance and enforcement with the Standards.  The IOUs also developed online courses that are available at any day and time of the year. These efforts included: developing and providing in-person training at CALBO Education Events, ICC Chapter Meetings, AIA Chapter Meetings; Institute of Heating and Air Conditioning Industries; attending events on a monthly basis to provide CEC updates; developing tools and resources to help simplify compliance and enforcement of the Energy Standards; and providing technical support to utilities' Energy Code Ace by reviewing their Energy Standards tools/resources and promoting utility funded training on the Energy Standards. The Energy Commission's budget for building code compliance, enforcement, and training and outreach was $3.2 million. The IOU and BayREN authorized budget was approximately $6 million.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: The state completed the Colorado Strategic Compliance Plan in November 2011 with the Colorado Energy Code Compliance Collaborative. The plan developed a model with a series of critical actions based on existing gaps to achieve 2009 code compliance in Colorado by 2017. Focus areas of the plan included: securing funding, promoting state and local policy, implementing outreach and training, and conducting compliance evaluation. Colorado continues to use this plan as a framework for addressing energy code adoption and compliance in Colorado.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: Baseline Compliance Study: In 2013, Colorado completed a statewide evaluation of energy code compliance. It found a rate of more than 90% compliance for residential construction, noting that more work could be done with HVAC systems. It also found that compliance with commercial codes was only 28%. In 2016, Colorado completed a commercial code compliance study to assess compliance for 2009 IECC. The Department of Energy requested that Colorado conduct quantitative and qualitative analysis to determine energy saved by complying with the code, as well as energy not saved due to non-compliance. Colorado received feedback from code officials and plan examiners noting that the commercial code is complex and time intensive. As a result, Colorado developed a simple methodology that looks at how buildings use energy and identified the top 15 code requirements that focus on high impact energy uses. Colorado is now administering trainings to jurisdictions and code officials on how to use this top 15 compliance checklist for the most effective use of time and effort.
  • Utility Involvement: Colorado's largest utility, Xcel Energy, continues to fund code-related activities with a budget of $25,000 per year for 2015 and 2016, and $50,000 per year for 2017 and 2018. It includes trainings across the state, additional commercial code compliance data collection, purchase of code books for local jurisdictions, scholarships for building officials to attend ICC training and a DOE codes conference.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: The Colorado Energy Code Compliance Collaborative is highly involved in building code compliance. The Collaborative's mission is to facilitate compliance with local energy codes and to coordinate energy code actions and policies throughout the state. The Collaborative was originally started and supported with funding from BCAP. Now, it is self-supporting and meets on a quarterly basis.
  • Training/Outreach: The CEO provides basic energy code education for code officials and plan reviewers to understand changes in the code and typical issues with compliance. The CEO also provides designers, engineers, and architects training on energy codes to ensure they specify the correct equipment / design and properly identify the code compliance on the drawings or submittals.  This in turn makes it easier for plan reviews or permit counters to check code compliance. For builders the CEO provides direct technical assistance on plan review for builders to ensure their building can meet 2015 IECC and if not, the cost effective ways for builders to comply. The state has also developed an Energy Codes Support Partnership Tool Kit to guide counties through the process of adopting new codes or updating existing ones. In FY2017, with the completion of the commercial code compliance study, CEO is hosting trainings and webinars for code officials and jurisdictions on the top 15 checklist for commercial code compliance. For FY2017, CEO's total budget for energy codes is $162,625. Xcel Energy has a budget of $50,000 for CY 2017.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: A proposal to conduct third party plan review and site studies has been approved by DEEP in its 2013-2015 C&LM draft decision. The Department of Construction Services and a committee that engages the Office of Construction Services, DEEP, the utility representatives, the Institute for Sustainable Energy and Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships (NEEP) is charged with the development and oversight of this effort. This process, once adopted, will be repeated annually through 2017 to determine additional training needs of local code officials, licensed inspectors, building designers and the trades, as well as the annual compliance rate for that year.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: In November 2015, DNV-GL submitted its C19-C&I Connecticut New Construction Baseline and Code Compliance Study to the Energy Efficiency Board. As of June 2017, CT, NEEP, and PNNL are conducting a CT residential code compliance study. This study follows the PNNL guidelines.  Compliance with energy efficiency code requirements for commercial and industrial new construction buildings permitted between 2010 and 2013 was estimated at 75% of the population. NMR has completed its 2016/2017 process evaluation of the Residential New Construction program.  As part of that study, NMR will conduct a baseline study.  Although these findings have not been reported to date, they will be provided in a separate report.
  • Utility Involvement: Utilities are involved in strategic planning and coordination, and utility-sponsored training. Regulatory guidelines have been established requiring significant utility involvement in supporting building energy code compliance. The Connecticut General Statute (16-245m) requires the utilities to submit a three-year Conservation and Management Plan.  The plan describes the utilities efforts in building energy code compliance-which the Department approves. Once the Department approves the plan, the companies are required to abide to it.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: A committee that includes the Office of Construction Services, DEEP, the utility representatives, the Institute for Sustainable energy and Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships (NEEP) meets regularly to review progress on the Gap Analysis and the Strategic Compliance Plan. The State of Connecticut is cooperating with Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships (NEEP) to adopt and implement the 2009 IECC. NEEP has developed a set of resources and model policy to assist with implementation. NEEP is an active member of BCAP/OCEAN.
  • Training/Outreach: The Department of Construction Services’ Office of Education and Data Management consistently offers energy code trainings. Recently the utilities have assumed responsibility for DEEP’s previous role of sponsoring code compliance training and outreach activities (GPRO and BOC training).  Please see the recent activities focused on these efforts below.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: In 2011, the Delaware Gap Analysis and the Delaware Strategic Compliance Plan were published and provided an overview of the strengths and weaknesses of Delaware’s energy code adoption, implementation, and enforcement.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: Delaware has not conducted a study/evaluation of energy code compliance, but the
    state is actively seeking to conduct one. DNREC Division of Energy & Climate went through the RFP process in 2016 to acquire a consultant to conduct a number of studies, including code compliance.
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: The Delaware Energy Codes Coalition meets quarterly to serve as a diverse stakeholder advisory group focused on code compliance.  Delaware also participates in BCAP. 
  • Training/Outreach: DNREC provided one-, two-, and five-day HERS training for county inspectors, housing authority staff, builders and DNREC staff. DNREC also hosted a second one-day class with an overview of HERS training and IECC 2015 adoption updates. There were 20 (+) attendee's. Approximately $100,000 has been allocated for training in 2017. 
  • Delaware's Division of Energy and Climate is in the process of restructuring its Energy Efficiency Investment Fund (EEIF) grant program, which incentivizes efficiency improvements at existing commercial and industrial properties, in order to leverage the EEIF as a mechanism to catalyze beyond-code design and operations. The current building energy code is being used as a baseline upon which improvements must be made in order to qualify for an EEIF grant. This would apply to existing building additions and renovations that trigger code compliance.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: The District Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs (DCRA) established the Green Building Division in late winter of 2013 to specifically focus on the strategic assessment and implementation of the 2013 DC Energy Code, 2013 Green Code, the Green Building Act, and other related regulations in the city. Based on the findings of a 2014 energy compliance baseline study, the Green Building Division built out a strategic plan and has built and staffed an entirely new enforcement program with eight full time employees from early 2013 until now. DC has completed a Comprehensive Energy Plan, called Clean Energy DC, which was published November 2, 2017. Clean Energy DC provides a detailed roadmap that outlines long-term targets and goals surrounding energy efficiency, generation, buildings, and transportation. 
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: In 2014, DCRA worked with the Institute of Market Transformation to conduct an analysis of the rate energy code compliance and to make recommendations on how to increase energy code compliance. The audit relied upon the City Energy Project Assessment Methodology for medium to large cities.  This methodology helps to provide an informal energy code compliance rate, and is not intended to be statistically valid.  A detailed code compliance study was conducted in 2016--IMT and Cadmus' audit found that DCRA set a new standard for commercial energy code enforcement, with a weighted code compliance rate of 99%.
  • Utility Involvement: Regulatory guidelines have been established requiring significant utility involvement in supporting building energy code compliance. DCSEU meets weekly with DCRA to discuss issues relating to the energy code, and reguarly offers code compliance trainings.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: The Construction Codes Coordinating Board (CCCB), housed with DCRA and whose membership includes District government and private-industry experts, drafted the strategic changes. More than 100 individuals, including architects, engineers, contractors, property managers, real estate developers and government regulators, contributed their time, through Technical Advisory Group meetings, to ensure the most appropriate codes possible. Other active stakeholder groups include the Residential Code and Residential Energy Code Technical Advisory Group, the Commericial Energy and Green Code Technical Advisory Group, and the Green Building Advisory Council
  • Training/Outreach: DCRA provides monthly green building trainings, twice-a-month residential energy code workshops, lunch-and-learn events with local architectural and engineering firms, speaking at local conferences and community events.  Work is also ongoing to develop a new DC Code Academy that will be offering a variety of green building related courses to code officials.  DCRA and DDOE also worked together to create to create a Green Building Roadmap to make it easier for teams to figure out what laws and codes they need to comply with.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) completed a baseline compliance study in 2012, which was submitted to the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR). The report presents data on energy code enforcement and compliance rates, and makes recommendations for targeting areas to improve compliance. FESC has also published reports on the historical performance of Florida’s building energy codes to determine more effective stringency and compliance strategies in the future.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: The state's last compliance study was conducted in 2014. Buildings were selected randomly around Florida using guidance from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building Energy Codes Program. Primary areas of the energy code were selected to evaluate how well compliance was enforced in each building. Ninety percent of the residential buildings were found to be passing the performance code although forms submitted had one or more items incorrectly specified in almost all cases. On average, 84% of what was specified on the form complied. Many jurisdictions did not have sufficient commercial building code forms to conduct a field evaluation. This occurred 25% of the time based on our commercial building sampling process. Of those commercial buildings field audited, on average 81% of the specified components were found to be in compliance. Additional energy code technical research is conducted on an ongoing basis for the Florida Building Commission's review.
  • Utility Involvement: Regulatory guidelines have been established requiring significant utility involvement in supporting building energy code compliance. The Florida Energy Efficiency and Conservation Act (FEECA), enacted in 1980, emphasizes reducing the growth rates of weather-sensitive peak demand, reducing, and controlling the growth rates of electricity consumption, and reducing the consumption of scarce resources, such as petroleum fuels. During the 2008 legislative session, the Legislature amended FEECA to place greater emphasis on the pursuit, through utility-sponsored incentives, of all cost-effective customer conservation and energy efficiency measures including demand-side renewable energy systems. Under FEECA, the Florida Public Service Commission (FPSC) must establish numeric conservation goals for each FEECA utility, at least every five years. FEECA goals were most recently set by the FPSC in 2014, taking into account the provisions of the revised FEECA statutes, changes in market conditions, improved energy efficiency standards for customer appliances, and updated building codes for residential and commercial construction. To implement the goals, each FEECA utility filed Demand-Side Management plans in 2015, outlining a set of programs for residential and commercial/industrial customers designed to meet the FEECA goals. FPSC approved the plans for all seven FEECA Utilities on July 21, 2015. The FEECA utilities began implementing the new and modified programs in late 2015 and early 2016.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: The Energy Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to the Florida Building Commission holds regular meetings on a number of building related issues, including building energy codes. The Energy TAC currently consists of ten members, three FBC commissioners and seven other stakeholder members. The FBC also has two Program Oversite Committees (POCs) who conduct business in compliance with the Florida Building Code, pursuant to Rule 61G20, Florida Administrative Code. The Product Approval POC considers approval of new construction products and systems that comprise a building envelope and structural frame, for compliance with the structural requirements of the Florida Building Code. The Education POC reviews applications for course accreditors, accredited training courses, and training providers, verifying that their educational materials accurately reflect the Florida Building Code and other topics under the jurisdiction of the FBC.
  • Training/Outreach: On-site training has been performed by Building A Safer Florida (BASF), Building Official Association of Florida, private entities and energy code webinars by the Codes and Standards Office of the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation.  Additional energy code technical research is conducted on an ongoing basis for the Florida Building Commission's (FBC) review. These reports provide the FBC with recommendations on best practices and technical evaluations for Florida-specific issues such as ventilation, air tightness testing. Links to this research are provided below:
    Technical Research FY 2014-2015
    Technical Research FY 2015-2016
    FSEC Building Efficiency Research Report Index

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: No strategic compliance plan has been completed in recent years. The Georgia Environmental Finance Authority (GEFA) and the Georgia Department of Community Affairs (DCA) have, in partnership with the Home Builders Association of Georgia, developed a program for builders to rent duct blasters and blower doors for compliance, which was a result of a previously completed gap analysis. 
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: Georgia is one of eight states participating in the US DOE's Residential Energy Code Field Study. Through the project, DOE plans to establish a sufficient data set to represent statewide construction trends and detect significant changes in energy use from training, education and outreach activities. The first stage of the study is comprised of a baseline compliance study.
  • Utility Involvement: Utilities have been involved in training for energy codes in the state. They also coordinate with the state during the update process.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: NA
  • Training/Outreach: The Department of Community Affairs and GEFA work together to provide training across the state when there is a code update.

Last Updated:July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: NA
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: NA
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: The Hawaii Building Code Council was created by the State Legislature in 2007 to promulgate updated codes in accord with national three-year code cycles, and regularly convenes stakeholders to discuss relevant issues: http://ags.hawaii.gov/bcc/.
  • Training/Outreach: The Hawaii State Energy Office (SEO), working with various counties, has provided a number of training workshops. Through its website, the SEO also provides building code information and training materials provided at the workshops.

Last Updated: July 2015

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: In June 2011, the Idaho Energy Codes Collaborative published a plan for 90% Compliance with the 2009 IECC by 2017, tasked by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. 
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: Starting in June of 2010, the Idaho Division of Building Safety (DBS), through an agreement with the Idaho Office of Energy Resources (OER), developed and implemented The Idaho Energy Code Compliance Database for tracking compliance. The database has been fully operational since June of 2012. Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA), with additional support from Idaho Power and Avista Utilities, has also completed a study of residential energy code compliance in Idaho with positive results: using three different methodologies, estimated compliance rates were 90%, 83% and 109%. The greater than 100% result from energy modeling shows that many homes are going beyond the minimum requirements.
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: The Idaho Energy Code Collaborative discusses code compliance, but that is not the main focus.
  • Training/Outreach: The Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) and Division of Building Safety (DBS) provide funding for training; the Division of Building Safety provides HVAC and energy code trainings. NEEA provides funding for the Idaho Energy Code Collaborative and the OEMR and DBS work in cooperation with stakeholders of the Idaho Energy Code Collaborative to provide energy code trainings for builders, contractors and building officials in all geographic regions of Idaho. Direct assistance for energy code compliance is available throughout Idaho. Energy Code trainings are also available through DBS, the Idaho Association of Building Officials (IDABO) and other members of the Idaho Energy Code Collaborative.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: The State Energy Office (Illinois Dept. of Commerce and Economic Opportunity) worked with BCAP to complete a gap analysis in 2010 and a strategic compliance plan in 2011.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: The State Energy Office received a federal grant in 2010 to conduct a compliance study to test DOE’s recommended methods for measuring building codes compliance rates. The study found a compliance rate of 86% for residential buildings based on the buildings sampled, but the rate was adjusted to 79% to reflect the lack of cooperation from a couple of jurisdictions. The compliance rate for commercial buildings was over 90% but a full statistically valid sample was not completed. Evaluation of codes compliance and energy savings attributable to the training and technical assistance programs has now been built into the annual Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification of the state’s Energy Efficiency Portfolio. In June of 2014, an Evaluation of Illinois Baseline Building Code Compliance was prepared for the State Energy Office by ADM Associates, Inc. The study found a compliance rate of 81.3% for new residential buildings based on the buildings sampled. ADM was unable to arrive at a statistically valid compliance rate for commercial buildings due to the unavailability of willing participants.
  • Utility Involvement: Illinois’ utilities are involved in the Illinois Commercial and Residential Building Energy Codes Enhancement Collaborative Program aimed at providing training, technical assistance, and rebates for third-party inspectors.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: A Stakeholder Advisory Committee is in the process of being formed by the Energy Codes Enhancement Program and (3) meetings are scheduled for the first quarter of 2017.
  • Training/Outreach: The Illinois Energy Office spends approximately $300,000+ annually for enforcement and training with close to 30 outreach/training events held. These programs also include blower door training, HVAC right-sizing training, and a code interpretation hotline. Other consultations involve a visit with a building department and their field inspection staff to discuss time-saving plan review or field inspection techniques.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: NA
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: NA
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: NA
  • Training/Outreach: The Division of Fire and Building Safety of the Indiana Department of Homeland Security (IDHS) has conducted several classes for state and local code enforcement officials with respect to the use of ComCheck and some basic energy conservation code information. No trainings have been held in 2015.

Last Updated: July 2015

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: In 2012 the State worked with Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL) to produce the Iowa Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide. The Guide is designed to assist the State and Local Code Jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation code for residential and commercial buildings. Iowa also finalized the State Energy Plan in December 2016. The plan can be accessed at Iowaenergyplan.org
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: The DOE Residential Energy Code Pilot Study for Iowa was completed in June of 2011. The Iowa compliance rate was 64% in climate zone 6 and 70% in climate zone 5.
  • Utility Involvement: No regulatory guidelines have been established with regard to involving utilities in supporting building energy code compliance. Though some IOUs volunteer to do residential builder training at the beginning of each year. In 2016 four events where held across Iowa.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: The Building Codes Advisory Council is a Governor-appointed group that decides when and how the state building codes are adopted and if amendments are required. An Energy Codes Workgroup was invited to discuss the 2012 IECC and suggest amendments to allow advancement to this code. The Workgroup had thirty participants from all aspects of the construction of commercial and residential buildings. The group meets as needed and will convene for two meetings in 2017. In 2016, two meetings were held.
  • Training/Outreach: The State Energy Code Engineer provides training programs for Contractors and Code Officials in an annual basis as well as through special requests. Each year the investor-owned utilities sponsor residential builder training, the State Energy Code Engineer conducts training for each of these four events across the state. The balance of training was done for Residential/Commercial Contractors and Code Officials. Any HBA group or jurisdiction can request a training event be held in their
    area, no requests have been denied.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: NA
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: The Kansas Corporation Commission’s (KCC) annual survey of local jurisdictions provides an initial baseline for assessing adoption and compliance.
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: In 2013 the Kansas Corporation Commission (KCC) established the Kansas Codes Collaborative, a stakeholder group involving utilities, local codes officials, and others. The new Codes Collaborative builds on the work of the previous Energy Efficiency Building Codes Working Group, with more emphasis on development and implementation of the plan to assess code compliance in local jurisdictions.
  • Training/Outreach: The KCC partners with Johnson County Contractor Licensing program to offer subsidized energy codes training for local contractors and codes officials.

Last Updated: July 2015

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: Kentucky partnered with the Building Codes Assistance Project to complete a gap analysis and strategic compliance plan in 2011.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: Beginning in late 2014, the Kentucky Departments for Housing, Buildings and Construction and Department for Energy Development and Independence are partnering with the Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, the US Department for Energy, and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in the administration of a three-year, $900,000 three-phase initiative to (1) measure the baseline energy codes compliance rate across the Commonwealth following the latest US DOE/PNNL protocol, (2) implement a range of code improvement activities, and (3) measure the post- energy code compliance rate to determine if there was improvement. Findings from Phase I were reported in November 2015. Phase 2 is ongoing through September 2016. Phase 3 will run from March 2017 through September 2017.
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: The current codes compliance study and improvement initiative fostered the development of a Codes Collaborative that meets three times per year.
  • Training/Outreach: Phase 2 of the code improvement/compliance study (just completed Apr 2017) resulted in a series of statewide workshops, a circuit ride (CR still active), and an online short-video library of codes training (still available).

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: NA
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: NA
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: NA
  • Training/Outreach: The state energy office has contracted with LSU with the assistance of SEEA to develop and conduct statewide code training. $50,000 has been made available for training.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: NA
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: In 2013, the Governor’s Energy Office surveyed all code enforcement officers in the 89 municipalities required to enforce MUBEC. For the 2012 calendar year, 99.7% of homes and commercial buildings constructed were in compliance (excluding buildings still under construction or awaiting final inspection).  Compliance was determined by number of building permits issued versus occupancy permits, or inspections performed by a third-party inspector.
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: The Maine Dept. of Public Safety, Bureau of Building Codes and Standards has an advisory board (Building Codes and Standards Board), comprised of stakeholders, to provide input on building energy efficiency.
  • Training/Outreach: There is advanced energy code training available; the cost is subsidized for code officials. This advanced training is a collaborative effort between the Dept. of Economic and Community Development, the State Fire Marshall, and the Energy Office. The state Dept. of Economic and Community Development offers training at the basic certification level (free to those applying for initial certification), as well as advanced energy code training. Once certified, code enforcement officers need to obtain training annually to keep their certification current. The Maine Building Officials and Inspector Association, as well as several regional organizations, seek out training opportunities for their members, and partially support the cost of these opportunities. 

Last Updated: September 2016

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: The Maryland Energy Association (MEA) completed a gap analysis and compliance plan, “Reaching 90% Compliance: Maryland Building Code Compliance Roadmap” in February 2012. 
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: Maryland, through a current DOE award, has an ongoing statewide effort to determine the rate of code compliance in all counties. Compliance studies in 2013 and 2014 were completed in two of the states largest counties - Howard and Montgomery - showing compliance rates above 90%.
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: MEA established a Codes Compliance Work Group (CCWG) in 2012. The CCWG was put together last year and met three times to give input and direction to MEA’s efforts at increasing compliance with the code. The group is composed of MEA, the Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD), local code officials, architects, builder’s trade groups and builders. There are about 20 members.
  • Training/Outreach: MEA, through a DOE award, is scheduling numerous on-site trainings to be held throughout 2015 and 2016. MEA also provides an Energy Code Coaching service that is available by email or telephone. The federal grant from DOE included over $30K for building code compliance training for code officials (the overall award was $764,091). As of June 2017, eight training and outreach events have been held this year, with a total of 46 classroom and field training and 21 outreach activities in total.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: Massachusetts has committed to a series of evaluation studies to inform a broad code and standards compliance initiative funded through the utility ratepayer sponsored statewide energy efficiency programs. The most relevant of a series of code compliance studies and memos completed in 2016 are:
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: The most recent residential and commercial code compliance studies were both completed in 2016.The MA compliance studies for residential used both the DOE PNNL protocol (based on a checklist approach) and an alternative methodology, developed as a result of a study combining state, federal and utility funding, and was refined by the residential code compliance evaluation team led by NMR. In a series of evaluation studies it's referred to as the MA-REC methodology, but it could be readily used in other states and cities. A similar approach was taken with Commercial building code compliance, but it is more closely tied to the PNNL protocol. In statewide studies results are reported for both the PNNL methodology (for comparison with other states) and the MA-REC methodology – which is used for tracking energy and greenhouse gas savings.
  • Utility Involvement: Under the 3-year Energy Efficency Investment Plan (EEIP) for MA filed with and approved by the Energy Efficiency Advisory Council (EEAC) and the MA Department of Public Utilities (DPU), there is a multi-year commitment to the Code Compliance Support Initiative (CCSI). The EEAC and DPU have consistently supported and approved this utility activity through the EEIP.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: Utilities, the Mass Save compliance program vendor, and public safety offices of the state meet quarterly.
  • Training/Outreach: The Mass Save Energy Code Technical Support Initiative provides Massachusetts code officials, design professionals, builders, subcontractors, material and equipment suppliers and others, with valuable building energy code compliance training, technical support, and documentation tools.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: Partnering with the Building Codes Assistance Project, the state has completed a gap analysis and strategic compliance plan, both in 2011.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: A code compliance study was completed by DTE and Consumers in 2015 and 2016, following PNNL protocol.
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: A group comprised of representatives from home builders, local building code officials, code advocates, and state government officials from Licensing and Regulatory Affairs meets 2-4 times a year.
  • Training/Outreach: No energy code training was conducted in the past year.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: Minnesota completed a gap analysis in October 2014 with the Building Code Assistance Project.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: In September 2013, the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry submitted a code compliance study to the Minnesota Department of Commerce. The study estimated the weighted average of residential building compliance with provisions of the 2009 IECC at about 76.8% and commercial building compliance at 91.8%. As of 2016, the Minnesota Center for Energy Environment is conducting a commercial code compliance study. This study is funded by CARD, the State’s R&D program that is funded through utility assessments. 
  • Utility Involvement: Utilities have been active participants in an ongoing commercial code compliance study led by the Minnesota Center for Energy & Environment. Utilities have provided input and assistance in determining study design and identifying areas of the code where compliance issues may exist.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: The Minnesota Energy Code Compliance Collaborative is facilitated in large part by Fresh Energy.
  • Training/Outreach: Minnesota is currently funding a pilot program, funded through the CARD program, to help develop training and outreach for building officials to meet the new codes. Center for Energy and Environment is currently developing and administering this pilot program. 

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: NA
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: No formal compliance study has been done. However, in June 2011, BCAP and Southface produced an economic analysis for building energy code adoption in Mississippi. This study estimated baseline compliance based on DOE data for building energy code compliance in jurisdictions across the State. Based on recent estimates, a large percentage of the State’s population reside in jurisdictions that have adopted a residential building code. Based on the June 2011 Energy Codes Economic Analysis conducted by BCAP and Southface, as well as additional data collected by MDA, approximately 60% (1.75 million out of a total 2.9 million residents) of the state’s population reside in cities or counties with building codes equivalent to 2003 IBC or higher, and the average code standard for these local jurisdictions is 2006 ICC.
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: An advisory group, the Mississippi Building Energy Code Collaborative, has been formed to meet on a quarterly basis for the implementation of both code training and enforcement (training schedule and compliance activities). The Collaborative is comprised of local and state code enforcement officials, builders, contractors, architects, engineers, energy managers, facility managers, and State government officials.
  • Training/Outreach: The MDA Energy and Natural Resources Division provides energy code training to educate codes officials, engineers, architects, and other interested parties statewide about the new ASHRAE 90.1-2010 mandatory energy building code for commercial and state-owned buildings. These codes training sessions complement the work of MDA by leveraging a network of officials to educate and implement the building energy code standard. 

Last Updated: July 2015

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: In 2011, Missouri completed a gap analysis with assistance from the Building Codes Assistance Project (see http://energycodesocean.org/resource/missouri-gap-analysis-report).
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: Missouri completed a compliance study of residential energy codes with the Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance. PNNL analysis is complete for all but the Manual J measure. Based on the data gathered during the study, the Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance estimated the compliance rate to be 64.6%, using REMRate software for each measure and assigning weightings through sensitivity analysis.The Division of Energy will be developing a compliance plan to submit to DOE.
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: A stakeholder advisory group on code compliance was active during the residential building code study in 2016. DE periodically provides members with information regarding code compliance and estimated savings from the study and works with utility members to encourage involvement in code compliance activities.
  • Training/Outreach: The Division of Energy provided results of the residential compliance study to the University of Missouri Midwest Energy Efficiency Research Consortium; its codes trainer included in his presentations to local building code officials. Division of Energy staff also proposed utility-sponsored code compliance 'circuit-rider.' programs with the Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance as a contractor; these efforts are not currently being implemented. The Missouri Energy Efficiency Research Consortium at the University of Missouri Columbia provides some training. Additional efforts will be collaborative with utilities or other entities or will use existing Division of Energy staff.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: In calendar year 2014, Montana DEQ hosted a stakeholder group whose purpose was to develop a strategic compliance plan. This plan has been developed and now used as a planning tool for 2015/2016.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: In 2012, the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) commissioned a study conducted by Cadmus to determine energy code compliance in Montana. Although the study is interesting, the results are questionable due to sample size, lack of return visits, and items analyzed. It has not been updated in the past two years.
  • Utility Involvement: Although no utility commission guidelines have been established, utility providers in Montana support energy code compliance activities through participation in the Code Compliance Collaborative, sponsorship of training events, testifying at adoption hearings, and supporting agencies such as NEEA in their outreach efforts. 
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: The Montana Energy Code Collaborative is coordinated by Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) and National Center of Appropriate Technology (NCAT). In 2013, DEQ initiated another stakeholder group to specifically address the need for a strategic plan and develop a long-term workplan to implement the stragic plan.  Upon completion of plan, DEQ handed this process back to NCAT who now hosts the Code Collaborative. The Collaborative meets every four months.
  • Training/Outreach: DEQ conducts on–site energy code meetings twice a year with most code officials. DEQ provides Residential and Commercial Energy Code summary booklets to all building department offices. In conjunction with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry, Residential Energy Code Summary booklets and energy component labels are delivered to all new houses in Montana. DEQ conducts onsite trainings with building code departments and contractors utilizing a blower door and infrared camera. DEQ also provides a 2 credit-hour energy code training session to real estate professionals and estimates that 40% of Montana real estate sales staff has attended a training session. With the adoption of the 2012 code; training has stepped up dramatically with offerings of conference workshops, webinars and multiple training opportunities across the state: http://deq.mt.gov/Energy/calendar.mcpx.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: In 2011, Nebraska worked with BCAP to publish a gap analysis and strategic compliance plan.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: The Energy Office completed an evaluation of recently built homes for energy code compliance in 2012. One hundred homes in 18 counties (only 44 homes were needed for a statistically valid sample) were evaluated by a RESNET Certified Home Energy Rater. In aggregate, the state average of energy code compliance was 64.7 percent. The highest compliance score was 83.67 percent, the lowest was 42.55 percent. Regional compliance rates were also calculated. By using a larger sample, the agency was able to evaluate homes in smaller code jurisdictions which was essential in designing specific training to address code jurisdiction staff deficiencies. The Energy Office also assisted in a code compliance study conducted by the Institute for Market Transformation. The study of 42 Nebraska homes in the three metropolitan counties (where 75 percent of new residential construction occurs) was completed in June 2013. The study also provides an assessment of the effectiveness of the localized, customized, one-on-one training being provided to codes staff members by an Energy Office contractor (retired codes official). This study estimated that the training provided had increased compliance by about 9 percent, or a state wide average of 75 percent compliance.
  • Utility Involvement: The state’s three largest publicly-owned electric utilities – Lincoln Electric System, Nebraska Public Power District and Omaha Public Power District – have a long history of providing very strong support (financial and in-kind) for building energy code upgrades, training, and code compliance activities. In the most recent example, Omaha Public Power District provided $10,000 in support of the Great Plains Energy Codes Conference. In the past, all of the utilities have provided financing, conference facilities and other types of support.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: Nebraska formed a Codes Compliance Collaborative in March 2013 with the assistance of BCAP/OCEAN and the Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance. There are approximately 35 active participants (code officials, homebuilders, state and local policymakers, utility representatives, architects and designers, HVAC professionals, home energy raters, educators,  a lender, suppliers, advocacy groups, and a representative from a general contractors organization) who are working on the structure of the collaborative, tasks and missions and funding. The Collaborative meets at least quarterly and continues to work at the committee level on issues of relevance such as training and funding sources.
  • Training/Outreach: The state actively recruits codes officials, builders, designers and other professions for workshop opportunities. The Energy Office provides customized, localized one-on-one technical assistance to local code jurisdictions. This effort, begun in 2012, utilizes the findings of the code compliance evaluation of 100 homes to identify deficiencies in each code jurisdiction. A specific training course is developed by a highly-respected, retired code official who then works one-on-one with local code staff to strengthen the identified areas of weakness. To date, nearly all of the state’s 29 code jurisdictions have received the customized training and additional sessions were provided in the metropolitan counties for intensive plan review compliance.

Last Updated: August 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: A Gap Analysis study was completed in 2011 which looks into the current state of code implementation and offers suggestions to increase compliance. A strategic compliance plan was also completed in 2011, detailing feasible actions the state should take in order to meet 90% compliance with the 2009 IECC by 2017. The state provided support to local jurisdictions under ARRA funding to pilot the BECP developed compliance tools to learn how local jurisdictions will/can use the tools and what time and expense it will cost the local jurisdictions. The Governor's Office of Energy also partnered with BCAP to develop an energy codes collaborative for the state, which first met in April 2012, and has also named seven Code Ambassadors. GOE continues to work with PNNL and contractors to provide training on the Nevada Compliance Implementation and Evaluation (CIE) Guide to building code officials and the building industry.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: A survey on energy code compliance rates was conducted in 2010 and revised. The Governor’s Office of Energy (GOE) is a supporting partner of a grant proposal recently submitted to DOE to establish baseline energy code compliance rates and to increase public education and outreach.
  • Utility Involvement: Regulatory guidelines have been established enabling significant utility involvement in supporting building energy code compliance. NV Energy and SW Gas partner with the Governor's Office of Energy on all stakeholder meetings and training.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: GOE partnered with BCAP to develop the Nevada Code Collaborative, which first met in April 2012, and has also named seven Code Ambassadors. GOE continues to work with PNNL and contractors to provide training on the Nevada Compliance Implementation and Evaluation (CIE) Guide to building code officials and the building industry. The Southwest Energy Efficiency Project (SWEEP) continues to facilitate the collaborative.
  • Training/Outreach: The Code Collaborative has formed a Training Subcommittee to determine current and future training needs. The GOE continues to work with PNNL and contractors to provide training on the Nevada Compliance Implementation and Evaluation (CIE) Guide to building code officials and the building industry. The GOE has held multiple training sessions on the Residential and Commercial Provisions of the 2012 IECC in both northern and southern Nevada to  educate and train contractors, vendors and building code officials. The GOE budgeted $10,000 for trainings. Four training events held over the most recent reporting year.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: In collaboration with BCAP, the Office of Energy and Planning published a gap analysis in 2011. The NH Energy Code Compliance Roadmap was completed in 2012 as part of the NH Energy Code Compliance project, initiated by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA).
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: NA
  • Utility Involvement: The Public Utilities Commission allows the Utilities to provide trainings using some of the funds derived from the Systems Benefit Charge. The state’s largest utility is actively involved in supporting energy code compliance through trainings, on behalf of all major utilities. 
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: The NH Building Energy Code Compliance Collaborative was established as part of the NH Energy Code Challenge, which is a stakeholder group of diverse professionals and individuals from a broad range of industries.
  • Training/Outreach: In conjunction with utilities, four training sessions were held in spring 2016.  Four additional trainings are scheduled for the fall of 2016. A complete list of training programs conducted in 2016 are provided in the 2016 Final Quarterly Report.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: NA
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: NA
  • Utility Involvement: Utilities participate on the NJDCA energy building code advisory groups and support the enactment of energy building codes as a cost-effective means to reduce energy usage.  They can participate on the advisory board but participation is not mandated. BPU sponsors and supports training for energy building codes as needed.  Recently NJDCA has had a grant to develop and advance training of their statewide building codes.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: The Uniform Construction Code Act establishes a Uniform Construction Code Advisory Board. And under the Uniform Construction Code Advisory Board, there is a mechanical/energy subcode committee which includes code officials, engineers and other stakeholders. 
  • Training/Outreach: The Department of Community Affairs offers spring and fall semesters of training each year.  Licensed code officials are required to complete continuing education to maintain their licensed. See  http://www.nj.gov/dca/divisions/codes/offices/licensing_cont_ed.html,  for a link for the NJDCA Spring 2017 Continuing Education Seminars.  There are 66 different Code Official training courses offered. NJDCA’s budget offers $1,500,000 for training.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: New Mexico completed a gap analysis and a strategic compliance plan in 2011 in partnership with the Building Codes Assistance Project.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: NA
  • Utility Involvement: No regulatory guidelines have been established with regard to involving utilities in supporting building energy code compliance. NM’s largest investor-owned utility has provided building code training as part of its energy efficiency programming.  Utilities conducted workshops on the energy code as part of the Efficent Use of Energy Act which support energy efficiency.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: NA
  • Training/Outreach: New Mexico is actively engaged in providing/supporting training programs and outreach and continues to work with home builder organizations to provide information, training and technical assistance needs. It is anticipated that the industry will request that the NM Construction Industries Commission start the review process of the 2015 IECC in 2017 so that it can be adopted.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: NYS performed a Gap Analysis and strategic compliance plan, or Action Plan.  Draft report was prepared April 2016, describing both Gap Analysis findings as well as an Action Plan for proposed measures to improve Energy Code compliance and enforcement. Gap Analysis findings included in-depth interviews with approximately 150 design, construction and enforcement professionals, as well as building owners and representatives from state and local government.  Gap Analysis also include a survey of approximately 450 NYS code enforcement officials and review of state wide compliance assessments and market intervention strategies designed to improve compliance and enforcement performed to date.  Final report is expected third quarter 2016.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: In 2011, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) completed a baseline compliance assessment of new residential and commercial buildings in response to New York State’s goal of reaching 90% compliance with the Energy Conservation Construction Code of New York State-2010 (ECCCNYS) by 2017, a condition of receiving federal funds through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). The baseline study examined residential new construction permitted under the ECCCNYS-2007 and commercial new construction permitted under Standard 90.1 2004 and 2007 and, in general, followed U.S. DOE protocol for measuring compliance. The study also established rates of compliance by U/A Alternative method using REScheck and COMcheck software. The study found residential new construction compliance rates of 73% and 61% (DOE protocol and REScheck, respectively) and commercial new construction compliance rates of 85% and 36% (DOE protocol and COMcheck, respectively). In 2015, NYSERDA completed a second baseline study of commercial renovations. On average, the study found that 100% of the sampled projects met code.  The study examined a relatively small sample size and primarily included projects of limited scope: 68% mechanical and domestic hot water, 26% lighting and 6% the building envelope. NYSERDA has found traditional compliance measurement efforts challenging in terms of cost, duration and data reliability.  To respond to these challenges, NYSERDA will take a different approach and conduct two Delphi Panel processes with a group of experts in new and existing residential and commercial sector design, construction and enforcement, to gather information on the frequency and quality of specific building practices employed in the State. Through the iterative process of collecting expert opinion and building consensus between experts, NYSERDA will analyze building practices and code compliance to estimate a baseline energy code compliance level for the State.   This estimate will be updated during the second Delphi Panel, multiple years later, in order to track how compliance changes over time and what the major contributing factors are for changing compliance levels.  
  • Utility Involvement: In October 2011, the New York State Public Service Commission issued an Order that includes over $16 million in funding for Advanced Energy Codes and Standards as part of NYSERDA's Technology and Marketing Development Program Operating Plan for 2012-2016. Long Island Power Authority has developed HERS infrastructure to promote codes and provides financial support for towns that adopt ENERGY STAR specifications as the local code. NYSERDA is planning three publications for late 2016, including a code enforcement manual, a manual for enforcing performance based compliance, a best practices manual for design professionals and a Code/Commentary specific to the October 3, 2016 update. Since third quarter 2015, NYSERDA has made available to municipalities free plan review, inspection and other energy code support. Finally, NYS is in the process of developing a stretch energy code for optional local adoption.  An advisory committee and working group of stakeholders is involved in developing the stretch code and a draft code is expected late 2016.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: NYSERDA staff, DOS, and contractors conduct regular meetings with the code enforcement, design and construction communities. In October 2014, NYSERDA hosted an Energy Code Working Group, composed of code enforcement officials, design professionals, energy professionals, DOS and other stakeholders, to gain feedback on ongoing training and support services offered by NYSERDA, as well as future needs. NYSERDA didn't host an energy code working group meeting in 2015. The 2014 working group meeting helped inform all SBC4 solicitations which produced all market intervention projects currently underway.  Regular stakeholder involvement is ongoing as part of planning the 2016 Energy Code Conference, NYStretch Code, and pending enforcement/compliance best practices publications planned for late 2016. Market research and stakeholder feedback is also performed to inform training efforts. Finally, CEF-funded interventions will be informed by extensive stakeholder involvement/voice of customer work.  
  • Training/Outreach: NYSERDA is funding training into 2018 specific to the October 3, 2016 code update.  In that time, 16-17 courses will be offered to code officials, design professionals, energy professionals and the construction trades.  Additionally, NYSERDA offers free, online training through its energy code training and support website, nyserdacodetraining.com. New online training will be developed in 2016-2017, specific to the October 3 code update. NYS will host an energy code conference and tradeshow on November 30-December 1, 2016, titled Design, Build, Comply New York.

Last Updated: September 2016

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: NA
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: North Carolina is one of eight states partnering with DOE to participate in a three year residential energy code field study.
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: NA
  • Training/Outreach: The Engineering Division of the NC Department of Insurance regularly conducts code trainings and they have energy conservation code training modules available on their website.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: NA
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: NA
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: NA
  • Training/Outreach: A series of seven trainings on the 2009 IECC were held across the state in January of 2015 for contractors, code officials, and aspiring code officials.

Last Updated: July 2015

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP) completed an Ohio Gap Analysis report in 2010. An update was published in 2014.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: No statewide compliance study has been done, although AEP Ohio completed a compliance study for their service territory.
  • Utility Involvement: American Electric Power Ohio and Columbia Gas provide funding for training as part of the Ohio Energy Codes Ambassador Program. Utility support is voluntary: the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio does not require utility investment in code compliance efforts.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: NA
  • Training/Outreach: Ohio DSA has facilitated development of an Ohio Energy Codes Ambassador Program, which has trained eight code officials from various regions of the state on Ohio’s most recently adopted codes. These code ambassadors provide support, mentoring, and/or customized assistance to their peers in nearby jurisdictions. Funding for this program is provided by American Electric Power of Ohio and Columbia Gas of Ohio.

Last Updated: July 2015

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: BCAP worked with Oklahoma stakeholders in 2012 to develop its Gap Analysis and Strategic Compliance Plan.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: NA
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: NA
  • Training/Outreach: Beginning in 2015, OUBCC provides free training to licensed building inspectors. These are one- or two-day training classes that utilize nationally recognized code certified trainers to teach the classes.

Last Updated: July 2015

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: The Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance conducts studies for the region, including Oregon-specific studies, to evaluate energy code-related progress, opportunities, and compliance. NEEA published a Market Progress Evaluation Report in February 2017 (in addition to recent compliance studies) to evaluate code efforts and affect implementation of the most recent commercial and residential energy codes. Oregon already experiences high code compliance based on other recent studies, but this study looked at other potential actions to improve state energy code implementation and development. This study looked at various code activities in the state, highlighted successful programs, and provided various opportunities for process and program improvement in Oregon to improve overall energy code implementation and compliance. NEEA, as well as other state organizations, can use this study to inform future near- and long-term actions to facilitate code implementation and compliance. 
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: NEEA completed a 2013 compliance study for the region. It includes recommendations to improve compliance, which Oregon is incorporating into training and process improvements. Design is underway for Commercial Compliance studies in the NEEA Region. NEEA’s study measured compliance on two scales and returned results of 91% and 96%, prescriptive pathway. For commercial energy code compliance, a pilot study to develop an appropriate methodology applicable to the region was completed by NEEA in April 2016. In late 2016 and early 2017, the design of a detailed Oregon-specific compliance study was initiated by NEEA, with direct input from the Oregon Department of Energy and the Energy Trust of Oregon on data collection and sampling structure. The initial design phase is complete, and NEEA's contractor for this study is beginning initial implementation of the detailed commercial code compliance study. Due to significant data collection requirements and in-field work, this study is fairly time-intensive and is expected to be completed at the end of 2018.
  • Utility Involvement: Regulatory guidelines have been established requiring significant utility involvement in supporting building energy code compliance. The Oregon PUC allows energy savings from code and code compliance to be included in utility IRP energy efficiency savings. The major investor-owned utility programs (gas and electric) are operated by the Energy Trust of Oregon, and the IOUs also support NEEA. The PUC and governing board provide oversight to verify that programs support code compliance and work toward advancing codes. NEEA, OregonHBA, Earth Advantage and ODOE provide outreach and training for contractors and design professionals.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: NEEA operates a regional code collaborative, with regularly scheduled meetings and cooperative deliverables to help align/compare codes in the region. Oregon also works closely with the Pacific Coast Collaborative (PCC) on codes and standards opportunities.  Also, the Construction Industry Energy Board (CIEB) is a Governor-appointed board in Oregon that
    includes stakeholders from other building code boards (Mechanical, Plumbing, Electrical, Residential, Structures, and the Oregon Department of Energy). The function of the CIEB is to facilitate state building code compliance related to energy efficiency, evaluate building code standards, and advise and provide recommendations to the state agency responsible for code administration (Department of Consumer and Business Services, Building Codes Division).
  • Training/Outreach: For the remainder of the market (contractors, builders, engineers, architects, etc), the Oregon Home Builders Association conducts outreach and training to homebuilders the Oregon Department of Energy provides training and a code hotline to builders, designers, industry and other stakeholders. OHBA and ODOE programs are supported by NEEA. Additionally, utility programs also support training and outreach for "beyond code" construction. Oregon has both residential and commercial code updates upcoming in the next year. In consideration of these updates, the Building Codes Division, Oregon Department of Energy, and NEEA will collaborate to provide a coordinated training effort to jurisdictions and industry to provide detail on new energy code developments. BCD total budget is spread across many teams (Policy and Technical Services, Training, Statewide Services, Enforcement) and funds are difficult to differentiate from non-energy tasks. Local enforcement by over 100 local building departments.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: The Building Codes Assistance Project completed a gap analysis in 2012. The Pennsylvania Energy Code Collaborative (PECC) met to further define best practices and recommendations and produced a compliance plan. In 2015, the Northeastern Energy Efficiency Partnership started facilitating the PECC and came up with a vision and goals for 2015 - 2020. The PECC group is currently working on tasks that support the vision and goals that include a state-specific plan with practical near- and long-term actions.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: Performance Systems Development (PSD) was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy to implement a residential energy code compliance study in Pennsylvania as a part of the eight-state Residential Energy Code Field Study. This study was performed in 2014-2015 with a follow-up evaluation planned to begin in July of 2017. The report on this study will be available soon at: https://www.energycodes.gov/compliance/energy-code-field-studies/. This project received financial and in-kind support from PECO and PPL electric utilities.
  • Utility Involvement: The electric distribution companies require code compliance for any of their Act 129 (financial incentive) programs. Additionally, under Act 129, EDCs will only get credit for codes initiatives if they are supporting projects that go above and beyond code standards because the standards are viewed as the baseline, regardless if they are currently being met.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: The Pennsylvania Energy Code Collaborative meets four times per year. The Pennsylvania Climate Change Advisory Committee meets at least six times per year.
  • Training/Outreach: For SFY 2016 - 2017, The Pennsylvania Code Construction Academy is providing nine half-day trainings on residential and commercial 2009 IECC and ASHRAE 90.1 - 2007. Additionally, they will be providing three webinars and six circuit rider trainings. These trainings are new, based off of the findings from Performance System Development's findings from the DOE Energy Code Field Study. The intended audience is residential energy plan reviewers and inspectors, but is appropriate for builders, design professionals, and other industry professionals. There were three state-funded energy code trainings.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: The baseline code compliance studies noted below included a comprehensive survey of all stakeholders in the building and code industry, with an emphasis on code officials. This survey offered a host of recommendations for strategic planning and subsequent improvement in code compliance and better building. These findings were integrated into the strategic planning for the Code Compliance Enhancement Initiative – only one piece of Rhode Island’s long-term plan on the advancement of codes.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: Various evaluation studies related to building code compliance have been conducted by National Grid. The 2011 residential code compliance baseline study, the 2012 C&I code compliance baseline study, the 2013 CCEI savings and attribution logic evaluation study, and the 2016 C&I code compliance study are the most recent studies. There are also on-going evaluation studies such as a residential code compliance study and a saving attribution study.
  • Utility Involvement: National Grid works with / coordinates with the RI Building Code Commission to provide trainings and support aimed at improving code compliance with the energy code in the RI Code Compliance Enhancement Initiative. National Grid is also actively involved in strategic planning and coordination with the RI Building Code Commission, OER, and other partners. National Grid is able to claim savings associated with the codes initiative as approved by the RI PUC.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: Since 2011, the RI Building Code Commission, NEEP, and National Grid have been working collaboratively on code advocacy, stretch code, and code compliance strategies. This collaborative approach led to the formalization of the Code Compliance Enhancement Initiative and will continue to monitor and oversee the implementation of the Initiative across the State in the coming years. Other active participants include the lead training vendor and the Energy Efficiency & Resource Management Council.
  • Training/Outreach: National Grid has provided code compliance support since 2013. The Code Compliance Enhancement Initiative (CCEI) aims to increase the ability and desire of the code enforcement system, design community (architects and engineers) and the construction community (contractors, builders and construction managers) to meet the locally mandated building energy code. National Grid works closely with the Rhode Island Building Code Commission to develop and deliver this initiative and has partnered with a number of stakeholders such as the Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships (NEEP) and the Energy Efficiency and Resource Management Council (EERMC). Efforts include classroom trainings, webinars, focus groups and on site demonstrations, as well as the development of an array of compliance documentation tools.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: South Carolina has completed a gap analysis, analyzing the current code implementation efforts in the state and making recommendations for achieving 90% compliance with the model energy code. The state also participates in BCAP’s Compliance Planning Assistance Program and completed a compliance plan in November 2011, providing a five-year roadmap for energy code implementation in the state.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: NA
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: NA
  • Training/Outreach: The South Carolina Energy Office (SCEO) sponsors training for code compliance. During the past year SCEO supported training on proper duct installation and repair through the South Carolina Association of Heating and Air Conditioning Contractors (SCAHACC), as well as training in code compliance at the SC Homebuilders Association annual meeting. In addition, the office collaborated with SCAHACC, the SC Homebuilders Association and the SC Sustainability Institute to develop and offer Duct and Envelope Tightness verifier training. Based on materials developed by SouthFace, the South Carolina program includes the option of in-person or online training, followed by mandatory field practice and testing for successful certification.

Last Updated: July 2015

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: South Dakota completed a gap analysis in collaboration with the Building Codes Assistance Project, published in January 2011.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: NA
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: NA
  • Training/Outreach: NA

Last Updated: September 2015

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan:  The Tennessee (TDEC) Office of Energy Programs, the Tennessee Department of Commerce and Insurance, and the Tennessee Fire Service and Codes Enforcement Academy) are currently engaged in a residential energy code compliance baseline field study. The Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) and its partner, Southface, are leading the initiative, which is funded by a U.S. Department of Energy award to SEEA.  This study will focus on a sample of single-family homes in the two climate zones in Tennessee and will identify the residential building energy code sections for which the State may wish to consider conducting additional education, outreach, and/or training.  The kickoff meeting was held in March 2017, and the study is expected to be completed in FY2018.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: Under state regulations, the State Fire Marshal’s Office is granted authority to audit local exempt jurisdictions every three years, in order to check that they are enforcing codes correctly.  Tennessee plans to complete an audit and see that local jurisdictions are within seven years of the most recently published code. Audits for commercial buildings include a plan review and inspection of a small sample of buildings (would not be considered a statistically representative sample). Approximately 90 jurisdictions are audited each year.
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: NA
  • Training/Outreach: 
    • In addition to adoption and enforcement of building energy codes, C&I provides training and continuing professional education courses to codes inspectors across the State through the Tennessee Fire and Codes Academy (TFACA). In 2013, the TDEC Office of Energy Programs (OEP) / State Energy Office provided $195,000 in grant funding to C&I to develop a 2012 IECC training program for inspectors. OEP also provided C&I the opportunity to participate in 2012 IECC "train-the-trainer" courses administered by Southface Energy Institute. The grant funding allowed C&I to purchase equipment and gain the knowledge necessary to provide training to codes inspectors across the State.
    • Following the grant period in 2013, C&I offered several free training opportunities to codes inspectors in all regions of the State. Classes are hosted at TFACA campus in Bell Buckle, offered in jurisdictions throughout TN, and will also soon be offered online for participants who are unable to attend the classes. TFACA continues to witness an evolution of TN inspectors' needs in regard to IECC training. Fellow jurisdictions have begun to take notice. Early in 2016, the town of Cookeville requested that TFACA come and provide training to approximately 40 of their local contractors which the town assembled for the sole purpose of learning the requirements of IECC. In February 2016, the East TN Building Officials Association asked the Academy to hold IECC – DET training for approximately 130 inspectors and building officials in their region to help their inspectors understand and implement IECC testing requirements.
    • As interest in IECC adoption and enforcement increases, TFACA will create more IECC courses throughout the State to move out of "introductory" training and into more "topic-specific" training. Currently TFACA and the SFMO have focused their planning to implement a comprehensive program change to incorporate "distance learning" which will change the way all Academy training will be offered, including IECC course delivery.

Last Updated: August 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: The South-Central Partnership for Energy Efficiency as a Resource (SPEER) collaborated with the Texas State Energy Conservation Office (SECO) to conduct a baseline study. The study did not attempt to measure compliance rates, nor was it released to the public. The main goal was to determine a starting point for Texas to evaluate compliance, to determine what could be documented and to identify next steps: http://energycodesocean.org/resource/texas-gap-analysis-report.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: Texas is one of eight states selected to participate in US DOE's Residential Energy Code Field Study. Through the project, DOE plans to establish a sufficient data set to represent statewide construction trends and detect significant changes in energy use from training, education and outreach activities. The first stage of the study included field data collection that suggested a high overall compliance rate. Phase II, in which SPEER will conduct intensive Education and Outreach Program, is ongoing.
  • Utility Involvement: Regulatory guidelines have been established enabling significant utility involvement in supporting building energy code compliance. SPEER is working with EUMMOT to use the data collected in the compliance study to develop new utility programs that will provide incentives to increase residential energy efficiency in new homes and improve compliance with energy codes.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: The Texas Energy Code Compliance Collaborative meets quarterly and is run by SPEER in collaboration with SECO: http://eepartnership.org/texas-energy-code-compliance-collaborative/.
  • Training/Outreach: SPEER has developed a statewide Energy Code Ambassador Program and these professionals have advanced training in the energy codes and provide peer-to-peer assistance to code officials and builders in their local areas, which is being expanded in 2014. SECO also provides several training programs around the state and has established an online training center, the Texas Energy Code Training Center: http://www.txenergycodetraining.org/. Approximately $300,000 were provided for close to 100 SECO trainings held between February and July 2016.

Last Updated: September 2016

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: Between 2010 and 2011, Utah was chosen to evaluate residential buildings against the 2006 IECC and commercial buildings against the 2009 IECC (https://www.energycodes.gov/sites/default/files/documents/Compliance%20Pilot%20Studies%20Final%20Report.pdf). Utah's pilot study was performed in two phases. The focus of Phase 1 was for the state and 10 local jurisdictions to gain experience conducting an evaluation of this type, and derive an initial assessment of energy code compliance. Concurrently with Phase 1 of their study, Utah developed a Utah Energy Code Compliance Roadmap to illustrate the best path forward for increasing energy code compliance in the state. For the Phase 2 study, 42 new residential buildings were evaluated across 22 jurisdictions, based on a random sample of homes generated by the State Sample Generator. To save time, each code inspector attempted to complete a 4-way inspection ,which looks at rough framing, rough plumbing, rough heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC), and rough electrical.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: Utah participated in a compliance pilot study in 2011 using PNNL methodology that showed compliance above 85% for residential and 80% for commercial buildings (both new and renovated).
  • Utility Involvement: The Office of Energy Development provides energy code training in conjunction with Rocky Mountain Power and Questar Gas. There is no specific utility commission guidance regarding utility code support.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: Utah established the Uniform Building Code Commission to review and provide recommendations to the state legislature in the adoption of building codes. As part of its process, the Uniform Building Code Commission holds public hearings to gather public input on energy code adoption decisions. The UBCC meets on a monthly basis and through its Education Committee, supports a variety of associations throughout the state focused on training and improving compliance.
  • Training/Outreach: The Governor's Office of Energy Development, in cooperation with the largest utilities in the state, manages an existing energy code compliance training program (Building Talks) that provides basic training in the current residential and commercial energy code and provides training on high performance building standards. The annual budget for 2016-2017 is $100,000, which supported 22 outreach and training events. Utah also maintains a long-standing Energy Code Ambassador network comprised of code officials who completed targeted training offered by the Southwest Energy Efficiency Project. These ambassadors work with other code officials through a peer-to-peer network to advance energy code compliance and enforcement.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: A gap analysis and energy code compliance plan was completed for Vermont and is available on the Vermont Department of Public Service website
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: The Public Service Department (PSD) measured compliance with RBES and CBES in recent Market Assessments, which were completed in February, 2013 and December, 2012 respectively. The technical compliance rate for residential was 74% and for commercial was 88%. They are available here. The PSD is in the process of updating the Market Assessments, which are expected to be completed in the summer of 2017.
  • Utility Involvement: Efficiency Vermont and Burlington Electric Dept. are required through their Order of Appointment to assist with providing Energy Code support (information and training).  The high level of participation in their new contruction programs, contributes significantly to the state's overall energy code compliance rate.  EVT also hosts the Energy Code Assistance Center, which distributes information on energy codes and answers builders, architects, and other contractors questions on how to meet energy code requirements. As the state's Energy Efficiency Utilities they fulfill this role in lieu of the Distributed utilities. They also provide assistance for filling out the certificates. After the state recently updated the codes they held numerous trainings for builders, architects, and realtors on the new requirements as well as blower door certification/training.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: The state began working with Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships to form a Building Code Collaborative in 2014. The group held its first meeting in 2015 and meets a minimum of four times a year.
  • Training/Outreach: The DPS includes funding for code training in most years in the SEP formula grant budget.  Efficiency Vermont also includes funding for energy code activities in their non-resource acquisition budget. Efficiency Vermont provides trainings to builders, town officials (including zoning administrators and code officials), architects, design and construction professionals, and market partners (real estate professionals, mortgage lenders, appraisers, attorneys) on energy codes requirements to increase compliance. The outreach to realtors has been particularly successful in making sure energy code compliance certificates are in place as they will require this when representing a buyer of a building before a transaction is completed. EVT, in partnership with PSD, has conducted several meetings for town officials on the updated building codes, including zoning administrators and code officials to discuss the energy code and the new requirements to obtain code compliance certificates prior to issuing Certificates of Occupancy. EVT has also started focusing some trainings to building supply store staff. Efficiency Vermont has a three year budget of $300,000 for energy code support including training to provide a basis for improving the overall level of code compliance, understanding, and construction practice.  The DPS provided $20,000 from the FY16 SEP Formula Grant and $20,000 from the FY17 SEP Formula Grant for energy code trainings.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: NA
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: The Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) completed a compliance assessment and submitted results to DOE/PNL in 2012.
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: Virginia does not have a formal stakeholder group. However, the state does regularly convene stakeholders including the Virginia Building Code Officials Association Energy Committee, EarthCraft Virginia, Sierra Club, Home Builders Association of Virginia, Apartment Owners and Builders Association.
  • Training/Outreach: The Division of Building and Fire Regulations within DHCD provides comprehensive training for both residential and commercial energy codes and has recently approved a voluntary certification program for code officials. The Virginia Code Academies budget approximately $3 million annually for developing training, providing training and certifying code enforcers across the Commonwealth.  All training materials developed and used by the academies are available at no cost to organizations and others who provide additional training to contractors, design professionals and other interested parties.

Last Updated: September 2016

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: Washington State has developed a strategic plan for buildings, which was updated in 2014. This plan includes recommendations for sustaining and expanding training opportunities, and evaluation of code compliance. A policy review is required by state law every three years. A new strategic plan for buildings is currently under development and is anticipated in November 2017.
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: A residential code compliance study was completed by the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) in 2013. This report describes the compliance of residential new construction in Washington State with respect to the revised state energy code: 2009 Washington State Energy Code (WSEC). The study team assessed compliance using two different approaches: 1) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Checklist Method and, 2) Significant Item Method. The Checklist Method analyzed how well the studied homes complied with each of the 61 code identified process and efficiency requirements, while the Significant Item Method analyzed compliance based on measures that were considered to have only the most significant impact on energy use. The completed study of residential energy code compliance in Washington demonstrates compliance rates at 96 percent and 97 percent for the Checklist and Significant Items Methods respectively. In addition, the study team assessed the energy impacts of code compliance by using a building simulation model to compare the relative energy use of "as-built" homes to the energy use of homes built to meet the prescriptive code. A commercial code code compliance study was completed in 2008 by NEEA and was based on the code enforced in 2001, which was based on ASHRAE 90.1-1999. At the time, compliance was measured at 94%. 
  • Utility Involvement: The regions utilities provide funding to NEEA, which provides the greatest funding for code development and implementation in the region. In May, 2017, NEEA adopted an additional funding path for Commercial Codes Enhancement, providing an additional $1 million to support early development of methods or measures with a focus on code adoption in the next 3-6 years. This is an innovative approach to the development of the next commercial building efficiency standards. Washington has a mandatory conservation standard that requires the state’s electric utilities to pursue “all cost effective conservation”. This requires utilities to support cost effective new construction beyond code as well as existing building retrofit activities. The Energy Independence Act specifically recognizes that utilities may take credit energy savings attributed to codes, third party programs and utility hook-up standards.
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: Washington State works collaboratively with other NW state in the development and implementation of energy codes. The Northwest Energy Code Group organized through NEEA brings state energy office, code enforcement trainers, and utility staff together to identify code enforcement issues, share training strategies and to develop new code language. This group has contributed to the national code development and enforcement success. Resources developed by these states are available through the energycodes.gov web site. The NW Energy Code Group and participating members have developed many code change proposals that have been adopted by into the model codes, including the IECC, ASHRAE 90.1, 189.1 and ASHRAE 62.2.
  • Training/Outreach: Washington State and NW regional collaborators have provided code training for more than 25 years. Code trainings are taken to the participants as requested by the states building departments, utilities and builder organizations. For the 2009-2012 code cycle, the Washington State University (WSU) Extension Energy program provided 215 trainings for a total of 5,164 students. This includes classroom training on all aspects of the code. It also includes field training with emphasis on completing air leakage testing certification required by the WA code. WSU also provides a detailed web site with numerous training aids, a builders’ field guide and supplemental information to assist in code compliance. http://www.energy.wsu.edu. The Northwest Energy Efficiency Council provides training for the commercial sections of the state energy code. For the 2009 to 2012 code cycle NEEC provided training to approximately 2,500 participants. NEEC also provides a detailed web site with numerous training aids, compliance forms and supplemental information to assist in code compliance: www.neec.net/. For 2016, there were 26 on site residental code trainings throughout the state reaching 898 participants. For 2016, 14 commercial code trainings were provided reaching 540 participants.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: West Virginia's compliance plan was published in 2011 and is available on BCAP's website. 
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: The Appalachian Residential Consortium for Energy Efficiency (ARCEE) is currently conducting a field study measuring residential energy code compliance rates in the state. More information is available at: http://energy.gov/eere/buildings/downloads/west-virginia-residential-energy-code-field-study
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: The W.Va. Fire Commission Legislative, Code and Regulatory Committee includes representatives from the state’s residential construction industry, code officials, home inspectors and the state energy office.
  • Training/Outreach: Training is provided by the W.Va. Division of Energy, WV Homebuilder's Association, and West Virginia University. 

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: NA
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: WI received funding from the U.S. DOE to implement a pilot study of compliance in commercial buildings. The 2011 study found that new commercial buildings were typically over 90% in compliance with the current commercial building code (at that time the 2006 IECC with WI amendments as addressed under SPS 363).
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: NA
  • Training/Outreach:  DSPS provides annual updates to code officials throughout the state as well as a UW-Extension session to architects, engineers and designers.  Eleven sessions covering residential and commercial construction. All licensed Uniform Dwelling Code (UDC) and WI Commercial Building Inspectors are required to obtain continuing education credits in order to renew their license. Each late winter/early spring, the four inspector associations put on trainings, but it is not mandatory. The Department of Safety & Professional Services offers various training courses throughout the year, which are also not mandatory. Some courses are available online, while others are addressed by organizations such as WI Focus on Energy, Energy Center of WI, WI Builders Association and others.

Last Updated: July 2017

  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: NA
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: NA
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: Wyoming Conference of Building Officials (WBCO)
  • Training/Outreach: The Wyoming State Energy Office has ongoing seminars available.

Last Updated: September 2016