State and Local Policy Database

Mississippi

State Scorecard Rank

46

Mississippi

7.5Scored out of 50Updated 9/2016
State Government
Score: 2.5 out of 6
State Government Summary List All

Mississippi offers a loan program for energy efficiency investments, as well as a public-sector lease program for energy-efficient equipment. The state government leads by example by setting energy requirements for fleets, benchmarking energy use, and encouraging the use of energy savings performance contracts. Research focused on efficient vehicles is conducted at Mississippi State University.

Financial Incentives List All

Financial incentive information for Mississippi is provided by the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE Mississippi).

Last Updated: July 2017

Building Energy Disclosure List All

There is no disclosure policy in place.

Last Updated: July 2017

Public Building Requirements List All

In 2013, the Mississippi legislature passed ASHRAE 90.1-2010 as the new mandatory statewide building energy code standard for commercial and State-owned buildings and facilities. The new energy building code became effective July 1, 2013.

Mississippi Sustainability and Development Act of 2013, requires all State agencies, state institutions of higher learning, and community and junior colleges to work with the Mississippi Development Authority (MDA) Energy and Natural Resources Division to develop Energy Management Plans. It also requires all State agencies to report energy consumption and cost or face penalties. MDA uses the Siemens Advantage Navigator system to track the total energy consumption and cost in all of the covered agencies throughout the state and reports this information to the Governor and Legislature on an annual basis. With 95% of all covered agencies reporting annual utility data, the state benchmarks about 70,000,000 square feet. Other public facilities are encouraged to participate in the State Energy Office’s online reporting system or to utilize ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager.

The Act also calls for a State Energy Management Advisory Board to meet at least once a year in order to review implementation of the State Energy Management Plan. State law now requires agencies to participate in the State Energy Management Program, in which they will benchmark their energy usage and develop energy management plans in order to reduce consumption.

Mississippi Senate Bill 3007 mandates benchmarking and monitoring for state funded new construction which is larger than 5,000 sqft and state funded renovation projects which involve more than 50% of the replacement value of the facility.

Last Updated: July 2017

Fleets List All

Mississippi Code Sec. 25-1-77 requires that at least 75% of all vehicles in the State fleet must meet EPA fuel economy standards of 40 miles per gallon (MPG) by July 1, 2014. Additionally, Sec. 25-1-77 states that the Office of Fleet Management must encourage the use of fuel efficient or hybrid vehicles, as well as alternative fuel vehicles, including ethanol, biodiesel, natural gas, and electric power. 

Last Updated: July 2017

Energy Savings Performance Contracting List All

Housed in the Mississippi Development Authority (MDA), the state has a detailed program with dedicated staff that oversees the Energy Savings Performance Contracting Program and Energy Efficiency Lease Program. The Program is actively involved, promotes the use of ESPCs, and offers a guide to clarify the process of using ESPCs and offers some sample documents. Under State Statute, MDA Energy and Natural Resources Division must review and approve Performance Contracts prior to their execution between an ESCO and any public entity.

Last Updated: July 2017

Research & Development List All

The Energy Institute (EI) at Mississippi State University works to develop new technologies to promote energy efficiency through combined heating and power concepts and energy audits, as well as developing technology to generate renewable transportation and heating fuel from biomass.

Under Mississippi's “Smart Business Act”, a corporation collaborating with a State university for research and development purposes, including energy-related research, is eligible for a 25 percent rebate of the total research costs.

Last Updated: July 2017

Buildings
Score: 1.5 out of 8
Buildings Summary List All

Mississippi is a home rule state, with a voluntary residential code based on ASHRAE 90-1975, Commercial codes were updated in 2013, setting the mandatory energy code standard for commercial and state-owned buildings as ASHRAE 90.1-2010. Jurisdictions can adopt more stringent codes. The state has completed a baseline compliance study, established a stakeholder advisory group, and offers training and outreach.

 

Residential Codes List All

Mississippi's residential code is voluntary and is based on ASHRAE 90 – 1975 and the prior 92 MEC. Based on a June 2011 Energy Codes Economic Analysis conducted by BCAP and Southface, as well as additional data collected by MDA, approximately 60% (1.75 million out of a total 2.9 million residents) of the State’s population reside in cities or counties with building codes equivalent to 2003 IBC or higher, and the average code standard for these local jurisdictions is 2006 ICC. Jurisdictions can adopt more stringent codes, and several localities have done so for the residential code: Gulfport, Biloxi, Horn Lake, Ridgeland, Jackson, Greenville, Oliva Branch, Pascagoula, and Moss Point.

Last Updated: August 2017

Commercial Code List All

Mississippi is a home-rule state, although its commercial energy codes are mandatory statewide. In the 2013 Regular Session, the Mississippi Legislature passed and Governor Bryant signed laws setting the mandatory energy code standard for commercial and state-owned buildings as ASHRAE 90.1-2010, which took effect on July 1, 2013. Jurisdictions can adopt more stringent codes.

Last Updated: August 2017

Compliance List All
  • Gap Analysis/Strategic Compliance Plan: NA
  • Baseline & Updated Compliance Studies: No formal compliance study has been done. However, in June 2011, BCAP and Southface produced an economic analysis for building energy code adoption in Mississippi. This study estimated baseline compliance based on DOE data for building energy code compliance in jurisdictions across the State. Based on recent estimates, a large percentage of the State’s population reside in jurisdictions that have adopted a residential building code. Based on the June 2011 Energy Codes Economic Analysis conducted by BCAP and Southface, as well as additional data collected by MDA, approximately 60% (1.75 million out of a total 2.9 million residents) of the state’s population reside in cities or counties with building codes equivalent to 2003 IBC or higher, and the average code standard for these local jurisdictions is 2006 ICC.
  • Utility Involvement: NA
  • Stakeholder Advisory Group: An advisory group, the Mississippi Building Energy Code Collaborative, has been formed to meet on a quarterly basis for the implementation of both code training and enforcement (training schedule and compliance activities). The Collaborative is comprised of local and state code enforcement officials, builders, contractors, architects, engineers, energy managers, facility managers, and State government officials.
  • Training/Outreach: The MDA Energy and Natural Resources Division provides energy code training to educate codes officials, engineers, architects, and other interested parties statewide about the new ASHRAE 90.1-2010 mandatory energy building code for commercial and state-owned buildings. These codes training sessions complement the work of MDA by leveraging a network of officials to educate and implement the building energy code standard. 

Last Updated: July 2015

CHP
Score: 0.5 out of 4
CHP Summary List All

The state has not adopted policies to encourage the deployment of CHP systems. No new CHP systems were installed in Mississippi in 2016.

Interconnection StandardsList All

There is currently no interconnection standard in place that applies to CHP.

For more information on interconnection standards, click here.

Last Updated: August 2017

Encouraging CHP as a ResourceList All

There are currently no state policies designed to acquire energy savings from CHP (like other efficiency resources) or energy generation from CHP (in terms of kWh production) that apply to all forms of CHP.

Last Updated: August 2017

Deployment IncentivesList All

There are currently no state policies that provide additional incentives for CHP deployment.

Last Updated: August 2017

Additional Supportive PoliciesList All

Mississippi has some additional supportive policies to encourage CHP, in the form of technical assistance programs. Mississippi Development Authority – Energy and Natural Resources Division in partnership with Innovate Mississippi has conducted workshops around the state to educate industrial, institutional, commercial and utility stakeholders on the benefits, opportunities and barriers pertaining to CHP deployment.

Last Updated: August 2017

Utilities
Score: 1.5 out of 20
Utilities Summary List All

The Mississippi Public Service Commission (MPSC) issued energy efficiency rules in July 2013 (Docket No. 2010-AD-2) that lays out a framework requiring investor-owned utilities to implement “Quick Start” energy efficiency program programs. The rules apply to regulated electric and natural gas service providers, defining elements of both “Quick Start” and teeing up issues and ideas for phase two “Comprehensive” portfolios. The rule also lays out criteria for program cost –benefit tests, cost recovery, and evaluation, monitoring, and verification (EM&V).

Each major utility serving customers in Mississippi has filed a Quick Start Energy Efficiency Plan to be implemented between mid 2014 and 2016.

The most recent budgets for energy efficiency programs and electricity and natural gas savings can be found in the State Spending and Savings Tables.

Last updated: July 2017

Customer Energy Efficiency Programs List All

Until recently, utilities in Mississippi offered few energy efficiency programs. However, the Public Service Commission's Rule 29 required "Quick Start" programs for utilities in the state (Docket 2010-AD-2).

In 2014, each major utility serving customers in Mississippi filed a Quick Start Energy Efficiency Plan to be implemented between mid 2014 and 2016. The first three years will serve as a trial period for the companies' proposed programs. The Mississippi Public Service Commission will review and evaluate each of the programs on an annual basis and will make recommendations as to successful programs for companies to include in their comprehensive energy efficiency portfolios. Programs that will be made available to customers in the Quick Start Phase range from residential lighting programs and low-flow showerheads to Prescriptive and Custom programs for Commercial, Industrial, and Governmental Customers.

TVA also operates within the state and has also taken strides to advance energy efficiency in its service territory.

The most recent budgets for energy efficiency programs and electricity and natural gas savings can be found in the State Spending and Savings Tables.

Last Updated: July 2017

Energy Efficiency as a Resource List All

There is currently no policy in place that treats energy efficiency as a resource. Utilities are required by the MPSC to file demand side management plans and implement energy efficiency programs. 

Last Updated: July 2017

Energy Efficiency Resource Standards List All

There is currently no EERS in place, however new MPSC rules issued in July 2013 establish a comprehensive phase which will set long-term energy efficiency targets.

For more information on Energy Efficiency Resource Standards, click here.

Last Updated: July 2017

Utility Business Model List All

In July 2013, the Mississippi Public Service Commission issued an order that defines energy efficiency program costs as the incremental program costs that are not already included in the then-current utility rates and the lost contribution to fixed costs associated with approved energy efficiency programs (See Docket No. 2010-AD-2). Mississippi currently allows utilities to recover lost contribution to fixed costs in their energy efficiency cost recovery riders along with direct program costs. Cost recovery mechanisms were adopted in September 2014. 

There is currently no policy in place that rewards successful energy efficiency programs, however a collaborative process has led to a draft of “guiding principles” for an efficiency rule which call for efficiency incentives. In July 2013, the Mississippi Public Service Commission issued an order allowing utilities to earn a return on energy efficiency investments through a shared savings or other performance based incentive mechanism to make these investments more like other investments on which utilities earn a return (See 2010-AD-2 Rule 29).

Last Updated: July 2017

Evaluation, Measurement, & Verification List All

Electric and gas utilities with more than 25,000 customers were required to submit Quick Start Plans with implementation starting in mid-2014 that included plans for EM&V. While specific of EM&V plans have yet to be designed for comprehensive programs, the success of the Quick Start Programs will largely be evaluated by independent 3rd parties hired by the utilities to provide EM&V services. EM&V plans will be more specifically defined as the state moves toward setting EERS and performance incentives.

For more information on Evaluation Measurement and Verification, click here.

Last Updated: July 2017

Guidelines for Low-Income Energy Efficiency Programs List All

Requirements for State and Utility Support of Low-Income Energy Efficiency Programs

No specific required spending or savings requirements identified, although most regulated utilities voluntarily offer low-income programs.

Cost-Effectiveness Rules for Low-Income Energy Efficiency Programs

No specific adjustments or exceptions to general cost-effectiveness rules are in place for low-income programs.

Coordination of Ratepayer-Funded Low-Income Programs with WAP Services

Level of coordination is unclear from publicly available data.

Last updated: July 2017

Self Direct and Opt-Out Programs List All

There are no self direct or opt-out programs in Mississippi. 

Last updated: July 2017

Data AccessList All

Mississippi has no policy in place that requires utilities to release energy use data to customers or third parties. 

Last Updated: July 2017

Transportation
Score: 1.5 out of 10
Transportation Summary List All

The state has complete streets legislation in place, but has not otherwise pursued policies to encourage efficient transportation system development.

Tailpipe Emission Standards List All

No policy in place or proposed.

Last Updated: July 2017

Transportation System Efficiency List All

Transportation and Land Use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: In 2010, the Mississippi DOT adopted complete streets legislation to incorporate bicyclists and pedestrians into all road planning, design, construction and maintenance activities. 

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Mississippi has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Updated: July 2017

Transit Funding List All

No policy in place or proposed.

Last Updated: July 2017

Incentives for High-Efficiency Vehicles List All

No policy in place or proposed.

Last Updated: July 2017

Equitable Access to TransportationList All
Mississippi does not have any state programs in place to incentivize the creation of low-income housing near transit facilities, nor does it consider the proximity of transit facilities when distributing federal Low-Income Housing Tax Credits to qualifying property owners. Last Updated: July 2017
Appliance Standards
Score: 0 out of 2
Appliance Standards Summary List All

Mississippi has not set appliance standards beyond those required by the federal government.

Last Updated: June 2017