State and Local Policy Database

Equity Metrics and Workforce Development

An integral area of focus for ACEEE is the advancement of social equity principles in clean energy and efficiency policy and program design. Historically, energy efficiency initiatives have failed to adequately serve and represent marginalized groups, particularly neighborhoods whose residents are predominantly Black, Indigenous and/or People of Color communities. These groups, as well as low-income residents, often face disproportionately high energy burdens, meaning they spend more of their income on energy bills compared to their counterparts. Underrepresentation of these individuals within clean energy policymaking and planning means many of the benefits these policies yield do not equitably reach all communities.

In recognition of these challenges, states are taking action to strengthen policy and program outcomes in ways that address historic underinvestment in low-income communities and communities of color. Emerging state efforts are also underway to address equity in community engagement, decision-making, and inclusive workforce development initiatives. Examples include conducting state-level needs assessments and barrier analyses and establishing internal protocols and metrics to evaluate the equity of policy outcomes. Policymakers and stakeholders can also work to address gaps in worker skills and include trainings, job placement, and job access strategies to help to bring marginalized groups into the clean energy workforce.

The information in this section is intended to capture current state efforts in this important policy area. We hope it provides a resource for policymakers, utilities, and clean energy and community advocates to identify leading examples to help equitably extend the benefits of energy efficiency to all households.

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

California’s energy plans have specific advisory group, policies, programs and metrics to ensure energy equity. State agencies involved include CEC, CPUC and California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD).

The Disadvantaged Community Advisory Group (DACAG), an advisory body consisting of representatives of disadvantaged communities, advise both the CEC and the CPUC on how programs can effectively reach and benefit communities disproportionately burdened by pollution and socio-economic challenges, including rural and tribal communities. The creation of CACAG fulfills a requirement in SB 350, the Clean Energy and Pollution Reduction Act of 2015.

2019 California Energy Efficiency Action Plan (Publication Number: CEC-400-2019-010-CMF), published by CEC, lays out policy pathways to improve energy program access for low-income and disadvantaged communities. These include: offering inclusive financing options that do not add personal debt, removing barriers that prevent programs with different missions to form leveraging funding for holistic building projects, and sharing programs that best target environmental justice communities.

The Energy Equity Indicators Tracking Progress report was developed to advance implementation of Recommendation 5 of the SB 350 Low-Income Barriers Study, which indicates the need for "collaborating among all program delivery agencies to establish common metric and collect and use data systematically across programs to increase the performance of these programs in low-income and disadvantaged communities." The CEC maintains maps and geospatial information on selected energy equity indicators. The map base highlights areas with 60 percent or less of statewide median income and disadvantaged communities eligible for GHG reduction fund programs. The map also identifies tribal areas and provides data on low-income areas with low energy efficiency investments, low solar capacity per capita, or low clean vehicle rebate incentive investments.

The CEC’s energy research and development programs also prioritize energy equity to ensure that the most vulnerable communities benefit from emerging clean energy technologies. The CEC’s EPIC program exceeded the requirements set forth in AB 523 (Reyes, Chapter 551, Statutes of 2017) for at least 25 percent of the technology demonstration and deployment funds to be expended on projects in and benefitting disadvantaged communities and an additional 10 percent of the technology demonstration and deployment funds to be expended on projects in and benefitting low-income communities. In March 2019, CEC EPIC staff helped conduct community-engagement meetings in Bakersfield and Madera. The meetings provided a high-level, educational overview to community members on CEC funding programs. Self-Help Enterprises, a low-income housing program in Visalia, helped plan and conduct localized outreach for these meetings and arranged guided tours of the communities for staff to better understand the communities’ clean energy needs. Additional outreach efforts were made to tribal, low-income, and disadvantaged communities in 2019, including requests for comments on proposed evaluation criteria and presentations on EPIC funding to tribal groups. In October 2019, the CEC launched the Empower Innovation online networking platform designed to connect stakeholders to form partnerships on public and private grant funding opportunities such as local governments, diverse businesses, community-based organizations, and tribes. At the November 2019 Disadvantaged Community Advisory Group meeting, CEC staff presented information on the EPIC program, provided a demo of Empower Innovation, and sought feedback to improve the program, including reaching out to diverse communities. In 2019, CEC EPIC staff also hired a Civic Spark fellow to work directly with the cities of Arvin and Paramount in an effort to better understand the needs of the disadvantaged and low-income communities they serve. The CEC EPIC program will continue to provide set-asides in applicable EPIC solicitations for projects in and benefitting disadvantaged or low-income communities. The new scoring criteria evaluates the benefits to the community, community engagement efforts, and localized health impacts. A map showing the CEC EPIC project sites located in disadvantaged communities can be found in the 2019 EPIC Annual Report.

The CPUC has extensive programs aimed at expanding access for low-income and disadvantaged communities to energy and electrification programs. CPUC’s building decarbonization effort has eight energy equity focused programs out of a total of 11. There are six programs dedicated solely to low income customers, and two others are dedicated to residents who are rebuilding their homes after the devastating wildfires of the last few years. For example, San Joaquin Valley Affordable Energy Proceeding dedicates $56.4 million for no-cost, all electric retrofits to homes that are in disadvantaged areas in the San Joaquin Valley that are not serviced by natural gas lines. Many of these residents have been using propane or wood for heating; once the San Joaquin Pilot is implemented, they will instead have modern space and water heating heat pump equipment.

CPUC’s Building Initiative for Low-Emissions Development (BUILD) program dedicates $80 million to all-electric new low-income residential buildings. The construction will be prohibited from having natural gas hook-ups. This program is being funded from the cap and trade revenue from natural gas utilities. SB 1477 (Statues of 2018) requires that no less than 30 percent of the total BUILD program funding be reserved to incentivize new low-income residential housing. The low-income building projects must (a) receive higher incentives than other types of housing, (b) be offered technical assistance, and (c) not result in higher utility bills for occupants. The TECH initiative targeting criteria include technology with the greatest potential for improving health and safety and energy affordability for low-income households.

The CEC provides access for designers of and advocates for low-income housing to the California Utility Allowance Calculator. The CUAC encourages energy efficiency investments in low-income housing by properly recognizing the energy bill reductions that tenants and building owners can realize, allowing those reductions toaccounted for in low-income property capitalization and valuation. HCD has several programs that incentivize or require energy efficiency and/or sustainable energy components within their affordable housing development projects. For example, Affordable Housing and Sustainable Communities Program (AHSC) funds land-use, transportation, and land preservation projects that will reduce GHG emissions by efficiently locating housing near destinations. Residents then have the ability to walk, bike, or take public transportation. Points are awarded for green buildings and renewable energy.

Multifamily Housing Program (MHP) funds projects for new construction, rehabilitation, and preservation of permanent and transitional rental housing for lower-income households. MHP offers points for sustainable building methods. In November 2018, Senate Bill 3 authorized the Veterans and Affordable Housing Bond Act of 2018 (Proposition 1) that issues bonds in the amount of $1.5 billion for this program.

Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Housing Program ensures funds for higher density affordable housing developments within a quarter mile of transit stations. Rehabilitation of these developments may include efficiency upgrades. The Veterans and Affordable Housing Bond Act of 2018 also made available $150 million to the TOD Program.

Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program - Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP) is not currently funded, but it is being monitored by HCD. This program provided funding for affordable housing, as well as the acquisition, rehabilitation, and rental or resale of single-family residential properties with possibilities for green and energy-efficiency retrofits where feasible.

Workforce Development

The CEC’s EPIC program developed many online tools and resources to share knowledge on the program’s clean energy research. These tools help utilities, decision makers, innovators, and other stakeholders strengthen resilience, safety and affordability. For example, the WISE resource has over 9,700 users and provides training on high performance buildings. This project provided education, outreach and resources for California's new residential building industry. This project provided on-the-job training to homebuilders, installing trades, subcontractors and field crews on the proper installation that will be needed to meet the state's requirements. Informational materials and success stories were also updated on the project website. Building Industry Technology Academy, a statewide high school program, also develops new curriculum that incorporated WISE into their annual build challenge in Southern CA.

2019 California Energy Efficiency Action Plan: Recommendations from the plan support additional locally led outreach and education, maximizing ongoing workforce development activities across state agencies, and leveraging relationships between workforce educators, state agencies, community colleges, and vocational schools. California already has active workforce development programs but more work is needed to ensure that family-supporting jobs are created in all communities.

Under the direction of CPUC, California IOUs have strong workforce requirements for customers to receive incentives. Downstream or midstream programs over $3,000 require installation by an experienced installer, or someone with active apprentices, or with a state or federal apprenticeship certification.

The Clean Energy in Low-Income Multifamily Building Action Plan (CLIMB Action Plan Publication Number: CEC-300-2018-005-SF) set forth early actions to implement energy and water efficiency, demand response, on-site renewable energy, electric vehicle infrastructure installation, and energy storage for multifamily housing in California. The CLIMB Action Plan addresses the SB 350 Barriers Study recommendation to "develop a comprehensive action plan focused on improving opportunities for energy efficiency, renewable energy, demand response, energy storage, and electric vehicle infrastructure for multifamily housing, with attention to pilot program for multifamily rental properties in low-income and disadvantaged communities”. Strategies in the CLIMB Action Plan include workforce development: "Coordinate with the California Workforce Development Board (CWDB) to streamline efforts in education and training supporting the development of distributed energy resources throughout the state, with a focus on multifamily buildings and low-income and disadvantaged communities."

The State of California is pursuing clean energy workforce development through Workforce Standards requirements and direct training through Workforce Education and Training programs. Workforce Standards In 2015, the Legislature passed SB 350, which mandated that the CEC develop a responsible contractor policy. The responsible contractor policy would be applied to all “ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs with an installation and/or maintenance component.” CPUC issued decision D.18-10-008 which required program funded projects that include heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) and Lighting Control measures to utilize installation technicians that meet workforce standards criteria to help improve installation quality in the areas of HVAC and lighting controls projects. This effort was designed to make a start toward workforce requirements, where more stringent or more broadly applicable requirements may be structured and phased in in the future. D.18-10-008 also stated that the CPUC would study the CEC Responsible Contractor Policy when it was completed as well as analyze programs that had applied workforce standards to determine if additional workforce standards should be applied. Additionally, the CPUC ruled in D.18-10-008 that all energy efficiency program administrators propose a common portfolio level indicator to track disadvantaged worker participation in all Energy Efficiency programs. Utilities in California provide two main Workforce Education and Training programs focused on energy efficiency workforce development: Centergies and Connections. The WE&T Centergies subprogram is executed primarily through the eight IOU Energy Centers throughout California. The Energy Centers are focused on sector strategies that will result in high-road sector-specific education and training. The WE&T Connections subprogram facilitates implementation of energy efficiency strategic planning for K-12, community colleges, adult education, and higher education institutions. It seeks to promote energy efficiency within these educational sectors while simultaneously providing energy related education as well as career awareness information to students.

Last Updated: September 2020

Colorado WAP is running a pilot program to install air source heat pumps. This pilot will help WAP clients with electrification both now via direct install and in the future once the pace of electrification and its impacts on energy rates are better understood.

The heat pump pilot program will likely lead to significant heat pump expertise development within both Colorado WAP and also across the state. Colorado has a low level of heat pump expertise as a result of historically low level of air conditioning system installation and repair. This low level of air conditioning expertise leads to a lack of knowledge of refrigerant-based cooling and heating systems; as a result, Colorado has a steeper learning curve than other states when it comes to heat pump installation. The WAP air source heat pump pilot will assist in electrification workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

Delaware is currently underway in the development of its first Climate Action Plan, which will be completed by December 2020. The Plan will outline how the State of Delaware will drive reductions of the greenhouse gas emissions that cause climate change and better prepare Delaware for its many impacts, from increasing temperatures to sunny day flooding and sea level rise. Developed hand-in-hand with residents, business leaders, and local governments, the plan will contain strategies that fit the unique needs and desires of Delaware’s constituents. The strategies and policy recommendations currently under consideration include equity-related metrics and methods for protecting Delaware’s most vulnerable populations from the effects of climate change.

The state's energy plans or electrification strategies do not currently include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

The DCSEU has minimum spend requirements and savings goals in low income communities based on its contract with the DOEE. In 2019, the minimum spend requirement was $3,854,487 and the DCSEU spend was $4,037,174. The savings target minimum was 23,278 MMBtu (electric and fuel unit equivalents), and the DCSEU achieved 37,868 MMBtu in 2019.

The DOEE has sought eligible entities to characterize the need for financial assistance to pay water, electric, and gas bills among low- and moderate-income residents in the District of Columbia. They will show how to research utility burden, collect primary data from low- and moderate-income residents, and analyze these data to generate recommendations to improve access and utilization of utility assistance programs.

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies currently include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

The state's energy plans or electrification strategies do not currently establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers, nor do they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

The Energy Efficiency and Conservation Pillar of the State Energy Plan objective is as follows: Encourage the expansion and diversification of energy resources, incentives, and programs. The strategy includes the following goals: Support Energy Efficiency Efforts in Underserved Areas; Low Income Housing Tax Credit; Connect and Leverage Iowa’s Energy Assistance Programs; and Heating Fuel Assistance.

The State Energy Plan has four pillars, one of which is Economic Development and Energy Careers. The objective of this pillar is to Increase the local talent pool for energy-related careers while promoting employment and training opportunities in the energy sector. There are two goals under the objective: Accelerate and Elevate Energy Sector Partnership Efforts; and Build Robust Career Pathways to High-Demand Occupational Needs. In an effort to prepare for a shrinking energy workforce with a growing energy demand, the Iowa Energy Workforce Consortium was organized by Iowa utilities with the purpose of bringing industry experts together to discuss and collaborate. To capture the full scope of the industry and utilize all parties that make up the workforce pipeline, the consortium also asked state agencies and community colleges to be a part of the discussion. These stakeholders meet regularly so they can continue to evolve with the changing workforce and keep a pulse on the needs of the industry.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

The Efficiency Maine Trust (EMT) program budgets in its Triennial Plan for FY2020-FY2022 reflect the minimum funding allocations to low-income customers set forth in rule -- see 95-648 Code of Maine Rules (CMR) ch. 3, §3(A)(2) and 95-648 CMR ch. 4, §3(2). For the the Electric Efficiency Procurement (electric ratepayer funds) this allocation is 10%. For the Natural Gas Conservation Fund (natural gas ratepayer funds), this allocation is set at a reasonable percentage considering low-income consumers’ share of gas load and the cost-effective opportunity available at their homes. For RGGI funds, the allocation to low income programs is 10%.

One of Maine's primary electrification strategies involves a goal to install 100,000 high-efficiency heat pumps over five years. This goal was set forth in a bill passed by the Maine Legislature in 2019: LD 1766 - An Act To Transform Maine's Heat Pump Market To Advance Economic Security and Climate Objectives. The bill requires the Maine State Housing Authority to include information in its annual planning process (for low-income weatherization programs) on targets and budgets related to the heat pump goal. Efficienct Maine Trust is also offering enhanced rebates for low and moderate income households. Efficiency Maine Trust has a 50% adder in its EV rebate program for any qualifying low income Mainer who purchases/leases for any qualifying BEV or PHEV. Efficiency Maine Trust earmarked funds specifically for disproprtionately low income communities in Maine to receive ehanced rebates for level 2 charging stations.

100% of WAP and LIHEAP-Weatherization funds are dedicated to low income Mainers who meet the criteria for LIHEAP eligibility. The funds are allocated pro-rata across the nine regions served by CAP agencies in the state.

Workforce Development

The Efficiency Maine Trust (EMT) Triennial Plan for FY2020-FY2022 continues EMT's past success of promoting training for key players in the energy conservation supply chain. EMT emphasizes the certification and licensing requirements for trade allies affiliated with Efficiency Maine programs. It also considers online and in-store training opportunities, scholarships, and other support for existing programs run by community colleges.

The Maine Legislature also passed a bill in 2019 -- LD 1282: An Act to Establish a Green New Deal for Maine -- that requires employers constructing a generation facility larger than 2 MW to employ apprentices.

The Maine Cliamte Council, created by legislation signed in 2019, began meeting in 2019 is charged with developing a Climate Action Plan by December 2020 that includes a clean energy economy transition plan. Specific legislative language: "The updated climate action plan under subsection 1 must include a clean energy economy transition plan that, as applicable, incorporates feedback from the Maine Climate Council working groups established under section 577-A, subsection 7 and which may incorporate feedback from other entities with expertise in education, training, apprenticeships, workforce and labor. The clean energy economy transition plan under this subsection must:
A.  Include opportunities for and address barriers to advancing the State's clean energy economy;
B.  Highlight strategies for the State's rural communities, workers and businesses as the State transitions to a low-carbon future that are designed to encourage good-paying jobs and long-term employment; and
C.  Identify policy recommendations; opportunities for public-private partnerships; workforce development and educational opportunities, including opportunities for training and retraining workers and the development of apprenticeship programs; and other strategies necessary to the creation of clean energy jobs and a robust clean energy economy in the State."

Last Updated: September 2020

The statute establishing the EmPOWER Maryland program requires each participating utility to develop a three year plan that addresses low-income communities and low-to-moderate income communities in their service territory. Since 2011, the Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) has been designated as the sole provider of energy efficiency programs for limited income ratepayers in the service territory of participating utilities. DHCD is required to develop three year plans for energy efficiency programs. In addition, the statute (State Government, §9–20B–05) establishing the Strategic Energy Investment Fund (SEIF) requires a portion of the SEIF to be used "to provide targeted programs, projects, activities, and investments to reduce electricity consumption by customers in the low–income and moderate–income residential sectors."

Legislation passed in 2019 established a Clean Energy Workforce Account within the Maryland Department of Labor to fund clean energy job training related to renewable energy, energy efficiency, energy storage, resource conservation, and advanced transportation. Per the statute, funding will begin in fiscal year 2021 and eventually total $8M. The Maryland Energy Administration also offers an Offshore Wind Workforce Training program.

Last Updated: September 2020

In addition to its oversight role through the EEAC, MA DOER oversees statewide in-home audit program through the Massachusetts Residential Conservation Services (RCS) statute (M.G.L. c.164 App.§§2-1 to 2-10) and the associated regulation and guideline. Pursuant to the RCS statute and regulation, 225 CMR 4.00, DOER is required to establish outcomes for the RCS program, and 3-year plan Program Administrators and Municipal Utilties are required to submit quarterly reports to DOER based on those outcomes. In 2020, DOER issued outcomes for the RCS. These outcomes include “increasing the  number of hard to reach customers served by RCS Programs, including rental, moderate income, and non-English speaking households”. DOER is currently developing a reporting framework for this outcome (as well as other outcomes).

Although this is more of a utility policy, in 2020, the EEAC will convene an Equity Working Group to better understand the needs of underserved customers and to design utility programs to better serve them.

Green Jobs Academy. The Green Jobs Academy has a dual mission: to provide entry level skills training preparing individuals for in-demand, living wage jobs with a career ladder in the weatherization industry, and to provide flexible, customized, continuing education training for weatherization and energy efficiency workers to continue to advance in the weatherization industry.  Among other things, the Green Jobs Academy is a Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) Network Verified Weatherization Training Center and provides training approved by the Massachusetts Utilities Program Administrators.

Building Operator Training. MassCEC is working to publish a report on the status of the Building Operations sector of the MA economy. The report will outline the current status of this workforce, including demographics, training needs (both short and long term), and career pathways. The report will guide MassCEC in preparing for future workforce programs.

Additional MassCEC programs include workforce pipeline development through financing green internships, clean energy job and resume boards.

Last Updated: September 2020

While the 2008 Clean, Renewable, and Efficient Energy Act set the foundation for many, if not most, of Michigan's present day clean energy standards, the Act did not set any specific policy measures geared towards underserved customers. The Act does, however, call for broad inclusion of low income customers in propsed energy optimization programs and specifically excludes low income programs from being adjudicated on cost effectiveness. The most direct means of energy planning for underserved customers comes via the Low Income Workgroup which was established by the Michigan Public Service Commission as a way to bring together State agencies, utility providers, and community stakeholders every month to address low income specific issues with the goal of enhancing available initiatives so they may better serve the needs of low-income customers.

The state's energy plans or electrification strategies do not currently include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

To help ensure that low-income customers have the opportunity to participate in CIP, Minnesota Statutes §216B.241, subd. 7(a) establishes minimum low-income spending requirements for electric and natural gas utilities and associations.  E.g. the minimum low-income spending requirement for public (i.e., investor-owned) is equal to 0.4% of gas IOUs’ three-year average residential GOR and 0.2% of electric IOUs’ three-year average residential GOR.

Many CIP low-income programs (most of which by design are intended to exclusively serve the needs of low-income persons) have tended not to be cost-effective, but the Department has historically not held low-income programs to the same cost-effectiveness standards as non-low income programs, and has allowed non-cost-effective low-income programs to be included in utility CIP portfolios recognizing their importance in serving these customers.  

The MN Department of Commerce also commissioned a 3 year study to evaluate the effectiveness of low-income program delivery through the conservation improvement program. The study assessed the current performance of the utility LI CIPs and identified opportunities for increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of those programs. Overall, the study found that the LI CIP is meeting or exceeding most of the statutory and regulatory requirements.

Clean Energy Economy is a prominent voice of Minnesota’s clean energy businesses including the following sectors: energy efficiency, renewable energies like wind, solar and biomass, clean transportation and energy storage. They work to support and expand clean energy jobs and the economic opportunities They gather clean energy data and share it with lawmakers and the public to craft smart clean energy policies that support a prosperous, low-carbon economy.

The MN Department of Commerce commissioned a study that will be published in 2020 to conduct an economic impact and benefit/cost analyses to quantify the net economic impacts of CIP investments made from 2013 through 2018. The key impacts from CIP’s 2013-2018 program activity years, include nearly 48,000 jobs, $11 billion in new economic activity, and a return of $3.75 in societal benefits for each dollar invested. Income generated equate to an extra $900 for each Minnesotan.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

The Missouri Energy Efficiency Advisory Collaborative, established by Missouri Public Service Commission rule and docketed under Case No. EW-2013-0519, includes a Low-Income Work Group that meets multiple times a year to specifically address low-income customers' energy efficiency needs. The work group meetings include a variety of stakeholders. In addition, the Missouri Public Service Commission rules at 4 CSR 240-20-094(3)(A)4 require that market potential studies, "Include an estimate of the achieveable potential, regardless of cost-effectiveness, of energy savings from low-income demand-side programs. Energy savings from multi-family buildings that house low-income households may count toward this target."

The state's energy plans or electrification strategies do not currently include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development. However, Division of Energy staff have been monitoring carbon capture technology and attending conferences and webinars regarding this topic when practicable.

Last Updated: September 2020

Governor Bullock's Blueprint for Montana's Energy Future highlights the need for analysis of need for underserved customers. Specific action items include "Put Montana on solid footing to eliminate, by 2025, the backlog of low-income weatherization needs for those households that have an energy burden higher than the Montana average. Direct DEQ and DPHHS to initiate a comprehensive stakeholder process to achieve this goal, by assessing the opportunities and challenges associated with boosting energy efficiency investments for low-income households, including those in Indian Country. The group should assess the challenges of energy efficiency work in a low-population density state like Montana, focus on a holistic assessment of housing stock in low-income and rural communities (including reservations), tackle obstacles and efficiencies in implementation of weatherization programs, and evaluate future opportunities for additional funding, including market-based mechanisms arising from carbon and similar markets."

Governor Bullock's Blueprint for Montana's Energy Future does not specifically address workforce development but is focused on growing an economy based on "balanced and responsible energy use." A specific quote from Governor Bullock states "Done right, we can drive economic growth and create and maintain good-paying jobs across Montana. We can improve our traditional base of energy generation while sparking a new generation of clean technology business, moving us toward more renewable energy, and encouraging innovation, savings, and energy efficiency for homes and for businesses."

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

The Home Energy Assistance (HEA) Program is specifically for the low income customers and provides energy efficiency improvements at no cost to the participants. The program serves all market segments of income eligible households including homeowners, renters, single family and multi-family units. Utilities contract with NH’s Community Action Agencies to deliver program services. These agencies also deliver services through the U.S. Dept. of Energy’s Weatherization Assistance Program so are well positioned to deliver needed energy efficiency services along with health and safety measures which may include heating system and indoor air quality issues. Per Settlement Agreement, the HEA program's budget is 17 percent of the total plan budget. Any unused monies in the HEA program carry forward to the next year. In addition. RSA 374-F:3, VI, signed into law on September 26, 2019, provides "that no less than 20 percent of the portion of the funds collected for energy efficiency shall be expended on low-income energy efficiency programs." The 20 percent requirement is specific to the electric utilities.

The state's utilities offer workforce training programs.

Last Updated: September 2020

The Clean Energy Act calls for the Board to adopt programs that “ensure universal access to energy efficiency measures, and serve the needs of low-income communities,” and the Energy Master Plan establishes that the State’s priorities in developing its statewide EE structure are affordability, equity, environmental justice, economic development, decarbonization, and public health. On June 10, 2020 the Board of Public Utilities adopted the framework for the next generation of EE programs, which seeks to reduce the inequity currently experienced by groups and individuals across New Jersey who disproportionately lack access to energy-efficient housing, appliances, and technologies. There are several approaches that the framework provides for addressing energy equity. The Board will create an Office of Clean Energy Equity, and will establish an Equity Working Group under the Energy Efficiency Advisory Council, which will comprise stakeholders from representative organizations across the state familiar with the intersection of energy, equity, and health issues, as well as representatives from each of the other working groups. This working group will be responsible for developing recommendations for integrating equity metrics and approaches in EE and PDR programs for utility-run, State-run, and co-managed programs. The EWG will collaborate with the Supplier Diversity Development Council on recommendations for increasing economic development opportunities for minority-, women-, and veteran-owned businesses, including through, but not limited to, procurement policies for contractors and subcontractors. Other approaches are the expansion of eligibility criteria for LMI programs by geography, streamlining eligibility criteria among state programs, Additionally, the utility targets and incentive/penalty structure considers performance in the category of low-moderate income programs as part of its evaluation criteria.

The Board of Public Utilities is establishing a Workforce Development Working Group to inform energy efficiency program design and evaluation. The WFD WG will comprise Staff, Rate Counsel, the utilities, EE suppliers, job training institutions and organizations, equity stakeholders, and other agencies, organizations, and representatives from the other EE working groups as appropriate. This working group will develop recommendations for establishing coordinated and collaborative workforce development and job training pathways and pipelines statewide, with a focus on providing economic opportunities for underrepresented and socially or economically disadvantaged individuals. Underrepresented and socially or economically disadvantaged individuals may include women, people of color, veterans, disabled, and formerly incarcerated individuals, as well as those who are unemployed, underemployed, or low- and moderate-income. Programs may include contractor and subcontractor coaching and mentoring of underrepresented, disadvantaged, and small business enterprises. The State will collaborate with the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, other state agencies, the utilities, the Workforce Development Working Group, and other entities, as applicable, the development of statewide workforce development pathways, training, coaching/mentoring, and other initiatives, including for underrepresented and disadvantaged individuals, communities, and business enterprises.

Last Updated: September 2020

The final supporting funds from a three-year Clean Energy States Alliance program on LMI efforts have been used to provide training supplies and tools for a LMI trades program at Northern New Mexico College. The college is located in the largest LMI community in the state, and supporting the trades program there is viewed as being a possible path for a brighter future for this community. The CESA program in New Mexico over the years of 2016 to 2019 developed the PV-on-a-Pole concept where a small system could be installed without using rooftop space or much ground space and still provide significant solar energy production for a low-income family. This concept has resonated with individuals both in state and out of state. The present largest effort for this type of solar sinstallation is in Humboldt County California. Also, the state is currently engaged in a statewide modeling effort (USDOE funded) to evaluate energy efficiency policies using a systems dynamic model. Results will show county impact levels. These results will be the first step in ensuring the LMI program(s) the state wants to pursue will have the desired impact on all residents, both rural and urban residents from all different income strata.

The 2019 Energy Transition Act includes apprenticeship requirements for renewable energy development in New Mexico and created three new funds (at the Indian Affairs, Economic Development, and Workforce Solutions Departments) to provide transition assistance to tribal communities, displaced workers, and communities affected by coal plant closures. The State Climate Change Task Force has an action team including ECMD, the State Economic Development and Workforce Solutions Departments whose goals include developing educational training, degree, and apprenticeship programs in state universities, community colleges, and technical schools. In addition, the statewide modeling effort will include job impact.

Last Updated: September 2020

The Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act (CLCPA), signed by Governor Cuomo in July 2019, includes provisions to ensure that disadvantaged communities receive at a minimum 35% of the benefits associated with the state’s clean energy investments, and sets a goal of 40% of the benefits from a broader set of investments accruing to disadvantaged communities. The CLCPA establishes a Climate Justice Working Group, which will be responsible for establishing criteria for defining disadvantaged communities.  

In the Order Authorizing Utility Energy Efficiency and Building Electrification Portfolios Through 2025, the Public Service Commission directed the utilities to allocated a minimum of 20% of new energy efficiency budgets to low-to moderate-income energy efficiency initiatives. Further, the PSC required the utilities and NYSERDA to develop a statewide LMI portfolio and an approach to better align utility and NYSERDA-administered initiatives to increase the effectiveness and impact of clean energy initiatives targeting the LMI market segment.

NYSERDA is investing over $108 million to train over 40,000 workers and to build on its long history of working in partnership with education and training systems to deliver the workforce skills employers need. With many of the state’s most skilled employees approaching retirement age, an insufficient pipeline of skilled workers to fill the gap, and technologies that are evolving rapidly, New York needs a readily available workforce that is skilled and adaptable. Many initiatives will target incumbent workers but, whenever possible, efforts will seek to identify and support future workforce needs and increase economic opportunity for unemployed, underemployed, and disadvantaged workers by developing and promoting middle‐skill jobs. Disadvantaged workers include but are not limited to those residing in low and moderate-income communities, underrepresented populations including women and people of color, and disconnected youth.

NYSERDA utilized an industry partnership (i.e., an ongoing dialogue among industry leaders on common workforce issues and opportunities) to identify the workforce training needs associated with building operations and maintenance. Building operations and maintenance partnerships is an industry partnership model intended to: help identify worker skill needs; inform investments in skills and talent development; support career pathways; and develop the training infrastructure needed to better link supply and demand in the labor market.

NYSERDA is also investing in developing a clean energy talent pipeline, a proactive approach to defining, attracting and developing the right mix of critical talent that is responsive to industry needs and market demand. Through increasing training capacity, incenting businesses to train new hires through on-the-job training, and supporting an internship program, the initiative will ensure that New York has the skilled workers necessary to meet clean energy and energy efficiency business needs.

The talent pipeline initiative is designed to support NY Clean Heat or building electrification and energy efficiency market enablement strategies. A total of $38 million will be targeted at training needs to support NY Clean Heat including targeted training to address critical needs related to NY Clean Heat incentive programs, a new career pathway training program for new workers from priority populations, new building electrification training programs and increased training capacity for designers, installers, technical sales staff and associated professional service workers and, increased incentives for companies hiring new heat pump workers. Working in partnership with businesses, training providers, and communities, this investment will provide training support for over 14,000 building industry professionals – helping New York State meet the labor needs associated with  NY Clean Heat goals and supporting New York’s vocational and training institutions for the long-term transformation needed to fundamentally change the way we heat and cool buildings.

Last Updated: September 2020

The state's Climate Risk Assessment and Resilience Plan offers climate justice recommendations for low income citizens that promote job creation and promote public health for the sector. The NC Energy Efficiency Roadmap addresses energy efficiency and demand side management strategies for low and moderate income communities. The state's Clean Energy Plan addresses energy efficiency and clean energy programs specifically targeted at underserved markets and low-income communities. The 2018 NC Energy Policy Council Biennial Report includes recommendations for residential energy efficiency measures for low and moderate income consumers including manufactured housing programs and weatherization assistance programs. A draft of the 2020 NC Energy Policy Council Biennial Report also includes energy efficiency measures for low and moderate income consumers.

The Clean Energy and Clean Transportation in NC: A Workforce Assessment Plan recommends and prioritize actions to help NC develop skilled and educated workers for a clean energy economy. The NC Clean Energy Plan contains recommendations related to "Equitable Access and Just Transition, addressing methods to relieve the energy burden on low income communities, provide job training, and develop a clean energy workforce. Various state agencies, college/universities and non-profits are taking actions identified in these recommendations.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

The state's energy plans or electrification strategies do not currently establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers, nor do they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

OPUC applies annual "diversity, equity, & inclusion" performance metrics to Energy Trust. The metrics for 2020 are:

  • Implement the data enhancement project as outlined in the 2020 Budget and Action Plan and deliver a minimum of four reports to the Diversity Advisory Council.
  • Implement and publish the “DEI Lens” project as outlined in the 2020 Budget and Action Plan and approved by the Diversity Advisory Council.
  • Complete 1,000 projects with trade allies that are minority-owned businesses in 2020.
  • Implement a rural-focused workshop as outlined in the 2020 Budget and Action Plan.

These are temporary metrics that will be revisited for 2021.

Oregon's Ten-Year Plan: Reducing the Energy Burden in Oregon Affordable Housing. Oregon Health and Community Service's (OHCS) Low-income Weatherization Program (LIWP) initiated a workforce development strategy to support the needs of low-income multifamily projects in Oregon. OHCS is completing a plan now for workforce development plans in Oregon, identifying the construction-related trades that need the most assistance, identifying geographic areas in Oregon needing the most assistance, and ways to best leverage current efforts to help address labor shortages in the trades.

Last Updated: September 2020

DEP contracted with ICF to work with PA Energy Programs Office staff and stakeholder to develop a Clean Energy Plan that will be finalized June 30, 2020. The plan addresses recommendations regarding equity to energy related services. Also, the Climate Change staff have been conducting forums and feedback through the environmental justice community statewide to ensure that the Climate Action Plan addressed programs and policies that address vulnerable communities. Lastly, the Drive Electric Pa Coalition of stakeholders are in discussion about developing strategies to address equitable electrification opportunities.

DEP contracted with BW Research Partnership to deliver two Pennsylvania-specific reports that will help determine the future direction of energy workforce development activities. This will include a Pennsylvania Clean Energy Employment 2020 Report (PACEER) and a Pennsylvania Energy Employment 2020 Report (PAEER). These reports will be based on data that BW is collecting as part of its US Energy and Employment Report. The PACEER will highlight employment in the major clean energy sectors and will also include workforce data such as demographics and employer hiring difficulties, revenue or wage data, and other customized data points. The PAEER will contain information on job growth over time and employer hiring projections in all energy technology sectors, not just clean energy. These reports will be released in June 2020. The Energy Programs Office has executed a contract with BW for a follow-on project to identify training needs and gaps in Pennsylvania for clean energy jobs. This work is been done as an outcome of DEP’s Energy Efficiency, Environment & Economics (E4) initiative, which was a result of a collaboration with ACEEE and a stakeholder group. This group recommended a focus on clean energy workforce development for the industrial and agricultural sectors.

Last Updated: September 2020

Rhode Islands's State Energy Plan - Energy 2035 - establishes a number of policies that direct support towards low-income and underserved customers. Specifically, it charges the Department of Human Services to oversee the WAP and LIHEAP programs, including the Henry Shelton Act which provides enhanced funding (~$6.5-$7.5million per year) from the State to the LIHEAP program. There is also a provision calling for the continued exploration of targeted energy efficiency programming for delivered fuels customers, which is an underserved population in Rhode Island. One outgrowth of this effort was that in 2019, through the Utility run EE program, delivered fuelscustomers were able to receive enhanced incentives for Air Source Heat Pump installations. The recently released Heating Sector Transformation in Rhode Island Report also advocates for the equitable transition of the heating sector through its policy recommendations, and encourages program designs that deliver appropriate incentives and financing opportunites for low-income customers that address first-cost barriers and energy burdens. Lastly, the utility's annual energy efficiency plans dictate a certain amount of spending on the income-eligible (e.g. low-income) sector. In 2019's Annual Energy Efficiency Plan (Docket 4888), National Grid sets funding levels of residential income eligible programs at 14% of implementation funding for electric programs and 26% of implementation funding for natural gas programs. Lastly, the Office of Energy Resources, regonizing the importance of equity in energy program, hired a full-time program manager for energy justice in 2019. This staff member is focused on energy equity and is integrated into all of OER's workstreams helping to explore specific policies and data around improving the equity of our State's energy work.

Increasing the size and skill of the RI clean energy workforce has been a priority since the inception of the State Energy Plan in order to ensure all cost-effective energy efficiency opportunities can be pursued. A component of the Grid Modernization Working Group was focused on identifying barriers in the workforce supply chain and developing strategies for recruitment and training to mitigate those. That focus is echoed in the recently released Heating Sector Transformation Report, which identifies workforce growth - particularly in emerging technology areas like heat pumps - as a key strategy to deploy in order to meet Rhode Island's decarbonization goals. In order to implement these strategies, the State has often utilized the Utility run energy efficiency programs as a vehicles for enhancing the workforce through targetted training and recruitment opportunities (often with waived enrollment fees). This partnership has led to significant growth in the RI clean energy workforce over the years, with a 25% increase in jobs since 2015. Additional emphasis is being placed on workforce development in the 2021-2023 Three-Year plan currently under development, with a focus on increased contractor training around heat-pump technology, enhanced recruitment and partnerships with colleges/universities/vocational schools to promote EE as a career, providing more training opportunities to exisiting workers looking to upskill or transition away from delivered fuels work, and promoting more participaton in building operator certification trainings, to name a few. The Office of Energy Resources collaborates with the RI Commerce Department each year to conduct a clean energy jobs report in order to track the industry and find ways to support growth, which is in direct service of Gov. Raimondo's 20,000 clean energy jobs by 2020 goal.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

TDEC OEP and OPSP convened the Single- and Multi-family Low-Income Energy Efficiency Exchange Group (the “Exchange Group”) in December 2015 and met regularly through the end of 2017. The Exchange Group was comprised of a number of State and local agencies, utilities, and non-governmental entities, such as the Tennessee Housing Development Agency (THDA), the Department of Economic and Community Development, Metro Nashville Government, TVA, Pathway Lending, and Memphis Light, Gas, and Water. The Exchange Group sought to share best practices regarding single and multifamily low-income energy efficiency exchange programming efforts in Tennessee; to leverage existing technical and financial resources to further design, implementation, and administration of energy efficiency programming targeting low-income single and multifamily audiences; and to explore opportunities to develop resources that can assist with implementation of energy efficiency programming targeting low-income single and multifamily stakeholders. The Exchange Group’s efforts are reflected in the Single & Multifamily Low-Income Energy Efficiency Program Resource Manual—a work product housed on TDEC’s website. Specifically, the Resource Manual provides a framework for designing, implementing, and evaluating key elements of low-income focused EE programming and is accompanied by extensive resource annotations and an online asset map. The resource matrix, which was included within the Resource Manual as an appendix and which outlines single and multifamily low-income energy efficiency funding opportunities, is currently undergoing an update.

THDA offers a Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) against federal income tax liability each year (for 10 years) for owners and investors in low-income rental housing. The amount of tax credits is based on reasonable costs of development, as determined by THDA, and the number of qualified low-income units. Tax credits are awarded through both competitive and non-competitive processes. Competitive applicants could be awarded additional points in the application process if they agreed to achieve Enterprise Green Communities Certification at the properties being funded. The Enterprise Green Communities Certification process mandates energy efficiency at properties being evaluated and rewards the following energy efficiency activities: compliance with other energy efficiency building programs, including the ENERGY STAR New Homes Program or Multifamily High-Rise Program (MFHR); installation of energy efficient appliances, lighting, and heating and cooling equipment; preparation of property for future or expanded renewable energy generation onsite; and other energy efficiency and renewable energy measures to decrease residents’ energy burden. Competitive applicants could also be awarded additional points for meeting all of the following ENERGY STAR requirements at the properties being funded: ENERGY STAR rated HVAC systems in all units, 15 SEER minimum; ENERGY STAR refrigerator with ice maker, 19 cubic foot minimum; overhead light fixture connected to a wall switch in the living room and all overhead light fixtures in other rooms connected to a wall switch in the same room; all light fixtures fitted with ENERGY STAR light bulbs; ENERGY STAR rated windows in all units; and all toilets high efficiency or dual flush. In 2019, $34,828,731 in LIHTC was allocated between both competitive and non-competitive applications; by the end of the year, 16,076 units were under construction, and 51,232 units at 595 properties had been placed into service under the program. THDA continued to update its LIHTC interactive map that displays properties assisted through the program since 1989.

THDA also administers Tennessee’s Weatherization Assistance Program, which was established under Title IV of the Energy Conservation and Production Act and amended by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act, the Energy Security Act, the Human Services Reauthorization Act of 1984, and the State Energy Efficiency Programs Improvement Act of 1990. The Weatherization Assistance Program is designed to assist low-income households in reducing their fuel costs while contributing to national energy conservation through increased energy efficiency and consumer education. Households that include young children, elderly, or disabled members are given priority for service. In 2019, THDA allocated $9,695,185 to eligible candidates under the Weatherization Assistance Program.

Finally, THDA administers Tennessee’s Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), a federally funded grant program created by the Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1981. The program aims to assist low income households, primarily those who pay a high proportion of household income on home energy, in meeting their immediate energy needs (including through weatherization outside the Weatherization Assistance Program). In Tennessee, LIHEAP is administered through a network of 19 local agencies that reach all 95 counties. In 2019, THDA allocated $187,073,215 to eligible candidates under LIHEAP, $6,481,699 of which was committed specifically to low-income weatherization projects under the program.

Workforce Development

In 2016, the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation’s Office of Energy Programs (TDEC OEP) launched a Professional Energy Manager (PEM) workforce development and training program that provided PEM credentialing to participants, instructing them on the principles of energy management, identification and implementation of no-and-low-cost energy efficiency measures, and other energy savings methods. The State encouraged diverse personnel with varying backgrounds, skillsets, and knowledge levels (e.g., facility managers, building operators, energy managers, financial officers, administrators) to attend the sessions and achieve the PEM certification. The program was offered tuition-free to State, local government, and utility employees, as well as to staff members from nonprofits and non-governmental organizations that operate energy-related programs. Following the course, participants were required to take and pass an exam in order to receive their PEM certification. By the end of the program, OEP provided PEM training to nearly 70 participants from the following sectors: public K-12 education; public higher education; local and State government; and state facility management. Although OEP no longer offers the training, PEM certification training is still provided by OEP’s program partner, the Institute of Energy Professionals (IEP). IEP offers a PEM training called the Energy Management Diploma Program, which has been attended by hundreds of energy professionals representing major corporations, cities, colleges/universities, military installations, and more.

In 2019, OEP’s State Facility Utility Management (SFUM) team also conducted over 75 in-person or online trainings on the State’s Utility Data Management (UDM) platform for more than 500 facility managers, accounts payable personnel, and sustainability professionals. The UDM platform is a uniform repository for utility costs and usage for approximately 8,000 State-owned and managed facilities (~103 million square feet, ~8,723 utility accounts, and ~10,835 meters) with integrated bill payment, utility tracking, and benchmarking capabilities. The platform provides a means for end-users—such as fiscal personnel, SFUM team members, State facility and utility managers, sustainability professionals, and technical assistance providers—to gain actionable insights into utility data for electric/lighting, natural gas, chilled water, steam, propane, fuel oil, and water/sewer services. In conjunction with trainings, the SFUM team created and published to the OEP website several step-by-step guides and resource videos in order to strengthen end-user familiarity and knowledge of the UDM platform and its capabilities. The UDM platform is currently utilized as a tool to bridge billing communications gaps and to promote collaboration between staff, providing a proactive approach for utility risk mitigation through bill review and a way to generate utility data reports for analysis with greater detail and speed.

Additionally, the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development provides several workforce development opportunities, including opportunities addressing energy, under partnerships with Tennessee Colleges of Applied Technology, Community Colleges, and other training institutions within the state. On June 18, 2020, U.S. DOE announced that it would invest $20 million in the University of Tennessee to advance workforce development in emerging energy fields. U.S. DOE’s investment will expand the University’s partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) through the Oak Ridge Institute (ORI). Over the course of the funded five-year interdisciplinary program, participating University of Tennessee students will focus on research and development in evolving technical fields, including resilient energy systems. In addition, students will also receive professional development training, including communications, computational literacy, and technology transfer, to prepare them for the 21st century workforce and develop their entrepreneurial skills. ORI will also develop a flexible workforce development program with modular interdisciplinary curriculum options that can be used as a model for workforce development partnerships between other universities, agencies, and national laboratories in the future. The program will support increased diversity and inclusion by encouraging participation among underrepresented minority groups, including military veteran, rural, and first-generation college students.

Several Tennessee entities also provide workforce development programs with an environmental or clean energy focus. For example, Knoxville’s Socially Equal Energy Efficient Development Program (SEEED) is a green community development non-profit focusing on creating and sustaining jobs for the city’s urban young people, as well as ensuring clean energy technologies are available for low income residents. SEEED creates pathways out of poverty for young adults through clean energy career readiness training, while equipping communities with environmental literacy skills.

Additionally, Build it Green (BIG) is a workforce development program offered by green|spaces in partnership with Build Me a World and Empower Chattanooga. Based on Knoxville’s SEEED program, BIG is a paid, 12-week energy jobs training initiative for young adults from low-income communities. BIG prepares its participants for entry level jobs in the energy services field while equipping them to engage low-income residents in sustainability practices and programs, such as for residential energy efficiency and weatherization projects. BIG also provides job shadowing opportunities and job placement assistance for all participants.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

All VT EEU's have low-income sector minimum spending requirements. Distribution utilities, which operate Renewable Energy Standard Tier 3 programs for fossil fuel reduction, must achieve equity in all sectors, including low-income, in measure or programs offerings. Programs include incentives for CCHPs, weatherization, and Electric Vehicles.

The state's energy plans or electrification strategies do not currently include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

The Virginia Clean Economy Act (SB 851/HB 1526) was passed by the General Assembly and enacted in April 2020. The VCEA commits utilities to timelines to provide 100% clean power (by 2045 for Dominion Energy, and 2050 for Appalachian Power Company). The VCEA increases the utlities' required investment in energy efficiency programs to serve LMI customers from 5 to 15% of total program spending. During the 2020 General Assembly session, legislation passed to enable Virginia's participation in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI). The Clean Energy and Flood Preparedness Act (HB 981) requires that fifty (50) percent of the revenue generated shall be credited to an account administered by the Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) to support low-income energy efficiency programs, including programs for eligible housing developments. DHCD shall review and approve funding proposals for such energy efficiency programs.

The Virginia Energy Workforce Consortium (VEWC) is working to build and strengthen collaborative efforts to significantly impact career awareness, education pathways, and approach tomorrow’s workforce needs in the energy sector.

Weatherization Training Centers. Through these centers, energy professionals gain expert training in the creation of healthier, safer, more energy-efficient living and working environments.

Last Updated: September 2020

In 2019, legislation was passed that created a prevailing priority across all CEF grant programs: priority must be given to projects that benefit vulnerable populations including Tribes and communities with high environmental or energy burden. Further, a new allocation of funds was established specifically for community solar projects that provide benefit to low-income households, low-income tribal housing programs, affordable housing providers, and nonprofit organizations providing services to low-income communities.  

In 2019, the Clean Energy Transformation Act (CETA) was passed creating new low-income and equity provisions for energy planning in WA. 19.405.120 RCW (Energy assistance for low-income households) mandates that all electric utilities in WA make programs and funding available for low-income households (a threshold to be decided upon by UTC and Commerce) prioritizing those with high energy burden (> 6%). Additionally, all electric utilities must provide data to Commerce on the amount of money spent on energy assistance programs, how many households and household type every other year. Utilities must also submit a biennial assessment report analyzing the effectiveness of programs (short-term and sustained) to reduce energy burden, outreach strategies including tribal consultation and language access and the funding levels necessary to meet: (A) 60% current energy assistance need, or increase of 15% from 2018, by 2030; and (B) 90% current energy assistance need by 2050. Utilities are mandated to make progress on these goals as part of compliance with CETA.

CETA also included equity provisions as part of the utility planning process. In addition to electricity being reliable, clean, safe and affordable, it must be equitable as well. Provisions as part of the 2030 greenhouse gas neutral standard (19.405.040(8) RCW) include language that states that every customer must benefit from the transition to clean energy including through an equitable distribution of benefits to highly impacted communities (19.405.020(23) RCW) and vulnerable populations (19.405.020(40) RCW). This requirement also extends to two new utility planning documents, the Clean Energy Implementation Plan (19.405.060 RCW) and Clean Energy Action Plan (19.280.030 RCW), where utilties must include these requirements as part of their long term planning. The rules for how this will be implemented are still in proces. There is also a new requirement that integrated resource plans include an analysis informed by a cumulative impact analysis based on a mapping tool currently being developed by the WA State Department of Health. Commerce and the UTC will develop rules to implement this tool into the utilty planning process.

CETA includes incentives for workforce developement in the form of a tax credit for using certain labor standards. The statute includes a 50 percent tax exemption for projects that make a good-faith effort at “procurement from and contracts with women, minority, or veteran-owned businesses; procurement from and contracts with entities that have a history of complying with federal and state wage and hour laws and regulations; apprenticeship utilization; and preferred entry for workers living in the area where the project is being constructed.”, 75 percent tax exemption for projects that meet the above criteria and also “compensate workers at prevailing wage rates determined by local collective bargaining," and a 100 percent tax exemption for projects “developed under a community workforce agreement or project labor agreement,” as certified by the WA Department of Labor and industries.

Last Updated: September 2020

The state's energy plans or electrification strategies do not currently establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers, nor do they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020

We were unable to determine if the state's energy plans or electrification strategies establish specific policies or equity-related metrics to ensure access for underserved customers or if they include specific measures to prioritize clean energy workforce development.

Last Updated: September 2020