State and Local Policy Database

Fleets

Collectively, state governments own approximately 500,000 vehicles. Operation and maintenance costs for these fleets every year run to more than $2.5 billion nation-wide. In response to this significant cost, states may adopt definitive energy efficiency standards for state vehicle fleets. These standards ensure a reduction in fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. States may also set binding goals to reduce petroleum use or requirements for the procurement of hybrid-electric or all-electric vehicles.

Alabama Act 2009-650 adopts a procedure for implementing and administering a green fleets program of procuring state motor vehicles based on criteria that include fuel economy and life cycle costing; requires fleet managers of state motor vehicles to classify their vehicle inventory for compliance with this act; establishes goals for fuel efficiency for state motor vehicles; establishes procurement policies; creates the Green Fleets Review Committee to ensure compliance; provides for advisory subcommittees; and provides that fleet managers submit annual plans for procuring fuel-efficient vehicles.

ACT-650 prescribes that the average fleet fuel economy be increased each fiscal year by four percent for light-duty vehicles, three percent for medium-duty vehicles, and two percent for heavy-duty vehicles, and implements an anti-idling policy for state owned or operated vehicles.

Executive Order Number 38 was signed by Governor Bentley on March 21, 2013, which ensured the compliance of the Green Fleet Law (Act 2009-650), which mandated improvements in fuel economy and emissions through life cycle cost procurement of new vehicles and utilization of proven new technologies in existing vehicles. This program focuses on issues such as fuel efficiency and cost-effective maintenance. The goal is to have the lowest possible cost per mile driven which is to include acquisition, operation and replacement.

Act 2019-219 requires the Alabama Department of Revenue to develop, maintain, and make available a fleet online registration and tax system (FORT system); to authorize the issuance of a fleet license plate by the department; and to establish an advisory committee.

Last Reviewed: August 2022

No policy in place or proposed.

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Reviewed: June 2022

No policy in place or proposed.

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Reviewed: September 2020

No policy in place or proposed

 Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Reviewed: September 2020

The State fleet met and exceeded the 20 percent petroleum reduction goal of AB 236 (Statutes of 2007) prior to the 2020 requirement. To continue the state’s efforts to reduce the state fleet’s petroleum consumption and GHG emissions and assist the state in meeting the 40 percent GHG emissions reduction goals set forth in EO B-30-15 and enacted into law in SB 32 (Statutes of 2016), California’s Department of General Services (DGS) established a new state fleet petroleum reduction target of 50 percent by 2030. To provide transparent and continuous updates on DGS’ progress toward meeting this goal, DGS will begin tracking and displaying progress toward meeting this goal on the state’s Green Fleet website in lieu of providing annual reports.

Additionally, the state recently issued Management Memo (MM) 19-05 in December of 2019 in support of EO N-19-19, which required state government to redouble its efforts to reduce GHGs and mitigate impacts of climate change. MM 19-05 prohibits state agencies from purchasing sedans powered solely by an internal combustion engine utilizing fossil fuels, as well as sedans powered by flex-fuel or bi-fuel engines utilizing petroleum-based fuels and other alternative fuels, such as ethanol. MM 19-05 also restricts state agencies from purchasing fleet assets from original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) that do not recognize California’s authority to set vehicle emission standards under Section 209 of the Clean Air Act.

Executive Order B-2-11, issued January 28, 2011, required an extensive analysis be conducted to eliminate all non-essential and cost-inefficient state fleet vehicles and equipment. The resulting right-sizing contributed to reduced petroleum use by the state fleet, particularly since the reduction was conducted to eliminate the most fuel inefficient vehicles. DGS recently issued MM 20-05, which notifies state agencies that DGS will conduct another evaluation of the state fleet to ensure it is right sized to government operations.

Executive Order B-16-12, issued March 23, 2012, requires California's state vehicle fleet to increase the number of its zero-emission vehicles through the normal course of fleet replacement so that at least 10 percent of light-duty fleet purchases are zero-emission by 2015 and at least 25 percent are zero-emission by 2020. Through this action, the state government’s fleet will be leading the way to the Executive Order’s goal of more than 1.5 million ZEVs in California by 2025, which will annually displace at least 1.5 billion gallons of petroleum fuels.

As required by the 2016 ZEV Action Plan, issued October 2016, California's state vehicle fleet is expanding upon Executive Order B-16-12’s zero-emission vehicle purchasing mandate and will ensure that through the normal course of fleet replacement at least 50 percent of light-duty fleet purchases are zero-emission by 2025. Management Memo 16-07 (December 2016) provides direction to state agencies for implementing the Governor’s 2016 ZEV Action Plan requirements. UC voluntarily adopted parallel targets for fleet replacement and commuter ZEVs in its Sustainable Practices Policy. CSU is in the process of adopting parallel targets for fleet vehicle purchases as part of the State University Administrative manual.

Policies enacted to improve the fuel efficiency of California’s state government fleet include:

  • Management Memo 17-05 (November 2017) – set optimum age and mileage replacement thresholds for the state fleet’s vehicles.
  • Management Memo 16-07 (December 2016) – provides direction to state agencies for implementing the Governor's 2016 ZEV Action Plan.
  • Management Memo 15-07 (December 2015) – requires state agencies to purchase renewable diesel fuel, in lieu of conventional diesel and biodiesel for bulk purchases of fuel for diesel powered fleet assets.
  • Management Memo 15-03 (April 2015) – increases the minimum fuel economy standard for light-duty passenger vehicles to 38 miles per gallon (MPG) from 27.5 MPG.
  • Management Memo 13-04 (January 2013) – provides direction to state agencies for implementing Executive Order B-16-12 requirements.
  • Management Memo 12-05 (May 2012) – reinforces the obligation for state departments to maximize their use of alternative fuels and reduces or displaces petroleum consumption for their fleets.
  • Management Memo 12-06 (May 2012) – requires state agencies to request reconditioned, used, or remanufactured automotive parts, and re-refined or synthetic motor oil and lubricants, whenever practical and cost-beneficial as state vehicles are repaired. The use of these products can help protect the environment and reduce petroleum consumption compared to the use of new materials.
  • Management Memo 12-03 (April 2012) – mandates solar reflective colors for most new vehicle purchases, which reduce air conditioning needs and related petroleum consumption.
  • Management Memo 08-04 (March 2008) – established a minimum average fuel economy standard for most fleet vehicles. Efforts are currently underway to update the established minimum average fuel economy standard to reflect the market availability of more fuel efficient vehicles.

Assembly Bill 236 (2007) added California Public Resources Code §25722.8 (a), establishing the goal of reducing or displacing the state fleet’s petroleum use by 10 percent by January 1, 2012, and by 20 percent by January 1, 2020, as compared to a 2003 baseline. As of January 1, 2017, the state fleet met the 20 percent petroleum reduction goal with a total petroleum reduction from the 2003 baseline of 22.3 percent. To date, the state fleet has reduced its petroleum consumption by at least 13-percent and is on its way to meeting the 2020 goal of a 20-percent overall reduction. Additional information about this achievement and other state fleet sustainability initiatives is available here.

Senate Bill 498 (2017) added California Public Resources Code §25724, establishing a statutory requirement for the Department of General Services to “ensure that at least 50 percent of the light-duty vehicles purchased for the state fleet each fiscal year are zero-emission vehicles.” This statute codifies the 50% requirement issued in the Governor’s 2016 ZEV Action Plan and will further drive the state fleet towards our goal to reduce fleet related petroleum consumption and emissions.

Assembly Bill 739 (2017) added California Public Resources Code §25722.11, which requires, beginning December 31, 2025, that at least 15% of newly purchased vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating of 19,000 pounds or more purchased by state entities be zero emission. The statute also increases the purchasing requirement to 30% in December, 2030. DGS will be developing statewide policy to ensure compliance with this statute and will continue to work to adopt more zero-emission vehicles in the medium and heavy duty weight categories.

Last Reviewed: June 2022

Executive Order D 2015-013 directs all state agencies and departments to reduce average petroleum-based fuel consumption per vehicle by a minimum of 4% annually and at least 20% by 2020 from a baseline of 2015 or 2% annually and at least 10% by 2020 for Department of Public Safety Highway Patrol vehicles. Executive State agencies and departments shall further achieve an absolute reduction in petroleum-based fuel consumption by 15% or 7.5% for vehicles deemed exempt over the same time period.

In January 2018, the State released the Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan. In addition to actions designed to build out high-speed corridor charging stations and accelerate adoption of EVs, there are multiple lead by example goals and strategies assigned to the State of Colorado. These include 200 EVs in the State fleet by 2020, creation of a workplace charging policy, development of a price agreement for EV charging stations, and improvements to the State’s vehicle procurement process that better facilitates purchase of alternative fuel vehicles. In April 2020, the State released an updated version of the Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan. The fleet procurement goal was updated, requiring State agencies to purchase 375 EVs by January 2022, with a goal of electrifying all vehicles that have appropriate use cases by 2030.

Executive Order D 2019 016 directs all agencies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from State fleet vehicles by at least 15% by the end of FY 2022-23 from a baseline of FY 2014-15 or at least 7.5% by the end of FY 2022-23 for vehicles categorized as special use. The executive order further requires that all agencies priorize EVs for light duty applications.

Executive Order D 2022 016, signed in April 2022, has a number of electrification-related goals and requirements. Agencies are required to purchase battery electric vehicles (BEVs) in cases where BEVs meet the Agency’s and/or Department’s operational needs and infrastructure is in place or is planned to be in place prior to vehicles arriving. Agencies and/or Departments may continue to purchase plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in cases where PHEVs better match the operational needs or charging infrastructure is planned for installation before arrival of the vehicles. Furthermore, Agencies and Departments must ensure that EVs (BEVs and PHEVs) are the default vehicle type for all light-duty vehicles for future vehicle purchases, and if an electric model is available to the State that is the same vehicle type approved for replacement, the agency shall select the EV. In cases where an Agency and/or Department believes that the selected EV will not meet the operational need, Agencies and/or Departments may request reconsideration of the selection or preferably, defer the purchase until the following year.

The 2020 Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan includes a quantitative goal for EV procurement - State agencies will prioritize purchase of ZEVs for light-duty applications, increasing the number of ZEVs in operation or on order from at least 200 by end of 2020 to 375 by January 2022, with a goal of electrifying all vehicles that have appropriate use cases by 2030. During the most recent vehicle procurement cycle, State agencies ordered more than 150 EVs, bringing the number of EVs in the fleet today or on order to approximately 400, exceeding the goal. A 2022 version of the Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan will be released later this year and will include a new goal for agency EV procurement for the next 2 years.

Colorado State Government also has charging infrastructure-related requirements. In addition to installing new stations at nearly 100 State facilities as a result of funding made available through SB21-230, the executive order requires that as part of new construction projects that include parking, 20% of parking spaces must be pre-wired (conduit and wiring) or EV-capable (conduit only) for Level 2 charging, and at least 5% must have Level 2 chargers installed. The installation requirement increases to 10% for proposed projects initiated in or after FY 2025-26. In addition, projects may substitute one direct current fast charger (DCFC) for every five Level 2 ports for the installation and pre-wire or EV-capable requirement where the technology is appropriate for the use case.

Lastly, the State Controller recently relased a policy that allows agencies to assign EVs that are taken home at night and where needed, install infrastructure at an employees home (dedicated circuit and if needed, charging station) and reimburse employees for the electricity used to charge a State vehicle.

Last Reviewed: June 2022

SB 4 or Public Act 22-25 An Act Concerning the CT Clean Air Act. The Act requires the state to purchase 100% battery electric vehicles-cars and light duty trucks by 2030. This will require EV parking spaces. And, 30% of state procured buses must be zero emission buses. The ACT prohibits state procurement of diesal fueled transit buses.

Last Updated: August 2022

Executive Order 18 sets goals for vehicles operated by state agencies to reduce petroleum consumption by 25%, vehicle emissions by 25%, and vehicle miles traveled by 15% by the end of fiscal year 2012 (using 2008 as the baseline year). In conjunction to these efficiency goals, the Governor requested that the size of the fleet be reduced by 20% from 2008 levels. Using data, Fleet Services was able to cut 22.6% or 579 vehicles. As of 2012, the amount of miles driven in Fleet vehicles was reduced by 21.62% and fuel use reduced by 11.22%. This saved 5,851,660 pounds of CO2 pollution into the atmosphere. One of the key components of EO 18 was to green Delaware's fleet and to enhance compliance with the Clean Air Act and Energy Policy Act.

All new light-duty vehicles state agencies, departments, and offices purchase must be hybrid electric, alternative fuel, fuel-efficient, or low emission vehicles, unless such a purchase compromises health, safety, or law enforcement needs. The State of Delaware Fleet Services purchased 10 Prius Prime vehicles as well as 3 Ford Focus Electric vehicles to add to the State Fleet Pool. Delaware State Fleet Services has committed to replacing 20% of the state fleet with EVs and PHEVs by 2025, totaling over 550 vehicles. The state has also negotiated multiple leases for rented state office space to include charging stations on-site for fleet vehicles. The Divsion of Climate, Coastal, & Energy is also funding a fleet charging project that will install charging stations at state-owned buildings across the state. This project will be complete by the end of 2020. The Delaware Department of Transportation also purchased two Ford Focus Electric vehicles and 16 Electric Transit buses, and plans to have 20 operating by 2021. Thanks to a new $2.6 million grant, these buses will be used throughout Delaware.

Last Reviewed: August 2022

The District requires newly purchased or leased fleet vehicles to be of the maximum fuel efficiency, minimum size, and appropriate engine size necessary to meet operational needs (District Municipal Regulation, Title 27, Section 2116). The policy also requires a minimum of at least 22 miles per gallon (D.C. Code § 50-203) and limits the purchase of SUVs unless they are to be used for security, emergency, rescue, snow removal, or armored vehicles.

District Municipal Regulation, Title 27, Section 2116 mandates the use of compact size, passenger vehicles for District government operations. Any exceptions must be justified based on a program needs and approved by the Director of the Department of Public Works (DPW). The Director of DPW has imposed a policy for every new vehicle purchased or leased; the same number of vehicles must be surrendered for removal from the fleet (one-for-one replacement). The DPW also utilizes right-sizing.

The DC Fleet Share program reduces fleet size and vehicle miles traveled and improves fuel efficiency. It comprises 85 government-owned vehicles, 98% of which are CNGs, hybrids, and E-85s including 4 all electric vehicles. The program has resulted in reducing 360 passenger vehicles from the fleet, or 17% of the fleet’s passenger vehicles. The program also helps reduce frivolous driving as agency managers can track vehicle usage in real time, detect whether or not a vehicle is left running, and the miles travelled for each reservation. The fleet also includes non-vehicle alternatives including segways, mountain bikes, and scooters which has allowed the District to avoid the use of fuel for the equivalent of 50 vehicles.

The Clean Energy DC Omnibus Amendment Act of 2018 (enacted March 2019) includes a goal on transportation electrification. Specifically, it calls for (among other vehicles) public buses, passenger- and light-duty vehicles licensed to operate in the District of Columbia to be zero-emission by 2045, with a plan to phase in at 50% by 2030, 75% by 2035, and 90% by 2040. Additionally, the Act requires the District Department of Transportation to submit a clean vehicle transition plan that, among other things, provides recommendations for policies to achieve 100% replacement of public buses, including school buses, with electric buses upon the end of their useful life, by calendar year 2021.

Last Reviewed: June 2022

Executive Order 07-126 requires the Department of Management Services to only approve the purchase of new vehicles with the greatest fuel efficiency in a given class, as required for that vehicle to minimize emissions of greenhouse gases.

In accordance with S. 286.29(3), F.S., each state agency ensures that all maintained vehicles meet minimum maintenance schedules shown to reduce fuel consumption, which include ensuring appropriate tire pressures and tread depth; replacing fuel filters and emission filters at recommended intervals; using proper motor oils; and performing timely motor maintenance. Also, in accordance with S. 286.29(4), F.S., when procuring new vehicles, all state agencies, state universities, community colleges, and local governments that purchase vehicles under a state purchasing plan must be selected for the greatest fuel efficiency available for a given use class when fuel economy data are available. (Reference: Section 286.29 Florida Statute).

Last Reviewed: June 2022

No policy in place or proposed.

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Reviewed: August 2022

Senate Bill 920 establishes clean ground transportation goals for state agencies to achieve a one hundred percent light-duty motor vehicles zero-emission fleet by December 31, 2030.

[§Hawaii Revised Statutes Chapter 225P-7] Climate change mitigation. (a) It shall be the goal of the State to reduce emissions that cause climate change and build energy efficiencies across all sectors, including decarbonizing the transportation sector. (b) State agencies shall manage their fleets to achieve the clean ground transportation goals defined in section 196‑9(c)(10) and decarbonization goals established pursuant to chapter 225P.

House Bill 2175 calls for each agency to purchase the most fuel-efficient vehicles that meet the needs of their programs, provided that life-cycle cost-benefit analysis of vehicle purchases include projected fuel costs. Eligible vehicles include those identified as a top performers for fuel economy in the U.S. EPA's "Fuel Economy Leaders" report.

Last Reviewed: June 2022

No policy in place or proposed.

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Reviewed: June 2022

To help achieve the statewide goal of reducing petroleum use by 20% by July 1, 2012, as compared to 2008 petroleum use, Illinois state agencies must work towards meeting the following goals:

  • By July 1, 2015, at least 20% of new passenger vehicles purchased must be hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and 5% must be battery electric vehicles (EVs);
  • By July 1, 2025, at least 60% of new passenger vehicles purchased must be HEVs and 15% must be EVs;

Agencies that operate medium- and heavy-duty vehicles must implement strategies to reduce fuel consumption through diesel emission control devices, HEV and EVs technologies, alternative fuel use, and fuel-efficient technologies. Agencies must also implement strategies to promote the use of biofuels in state vehicles; reduce the environmental impacts of employee travel; and encourage employees to adopt alternative travel methods, such as carpooling.

Last Reviewed: September 2020

No policy in place or proposed

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Reviewed: June 2022

No policy in place or proposed

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Reviewed: June 2022

The Kansas secretary of administration shall adopt rules and regulations that require that the average fuel economy standard for state-owned motor vehicles purchased during fiscal year 2011 shall not be less than 10% higher than the average fuel economy standard of state-owned motor vehicles purchased during fiscal year 2008, if such higher average fuel economy standards are life-cycle cost effective for such motor vehicles purchased during fiscal year 2011.

Last Reviewed: September 2020

No mandatory policy in place or proposed. The Kentucky Division of Fleet Management is a member of the Green Fleets of the Bluegrass. Green Fleets of the Bluegrass aims to improve the environmental performance of vehicle fleets across Kentucky by reducing petroleum fuel use. Green Fleets of the Bluegrass is a voluntary recognition program of the Kentucky Clean Fuels Coalition (KCFC).

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Reviewed: September 2020

LA Revised Statute 39:364 requires the Commissioner of Administration to purchase and/or lease alternative fueled vehicles unless fueling infrastructure is not available in the area where the vehicles will operate.

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must require specific improvements to state fleet efficiency that exceed existing Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards.  State procurement requirements for hybrid-electric or plug-in electric vehicles may be counted, but alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are not included. 

Louisiana has also contracted for the installation of GPS monitoring in all state vehicles to ensure efficient utilization and prevent excessive idle time, speeding, and unnecessary travel.

Last Reviewed: September 2020

Statute (MRSA Title 5 1812-E) mandates that except for cars and light-duty trucks purchased for law enforcement and other special use purposes, the State Purchasing Agent may not purchase or lease any car or light-duty truck for state use unless the car has a manufacturer's estimated highway mileage rating of at least 45 mpg and the light-duty truck has a manufacturer's estimated highway mileage rating of at least 35 mpg.

Pursuant to the Governor's Executive Order, the Maine DOT Central Fleet has purchased six battery electric vehicles for usage across state government.

Last Reviewed: June 2022

Chapter 38 (pages 85 and 86) of the Acts of the Maryland General Assembly in 2022 stated that it is the intent of the General Assembly that 100% of passenger cars in the state vehicle fleet be zero-emission vehicles by 2031, and other light-duty vehicles by 2036, with exceptions for vehicles with special performance requirements necessary for the protection and welfare of the public, or for paratransit service provided by the Maryland Transit Administration. Interim goals for zero-emission vehicles (ZEV) are established by fiscal year (FY) (i.e., for FY23-FY25, at least 25% of passenger cars purchased for the state fleet are ZEV; in FY26 and FY27, at least 50% of passenger cars purchased for the state are ZEV; and beginning in FY28, 100% or passenger cars purchased for the state fleet are ZEV). Additionally, beginning in fiscal year 2024, any passenger car purchased for the state fleet that is not a zero-emission vehicle should be a hybrid vehicle. Finally, for other light-duty vehicles purchased for the state fleet, at least 50% are ZEV in FY31 and FY32 and 100% by FY33.

Last Updated: June 2022

There are various requirements to increase the efficiency of vehicles owned and operated by state entities.

The Green Communities Act requires the state to purchase hybrid and alternative fuel vehicles in such numbers that 50% of the fleet is hybrid or AFV by 2018. In addition, the Green Communities Act also requires the development of a fuel efficiency standard (FES) for the state fleet. This standard was developed and approved by DOER and the Operational Services Division in 2016 and encompasses the state’s executive branch lighter duty fleet of more than 3,000 vehicles. Currently the Standard sets minimum combined MPG requirements by vehicle class and alternative fuel vehicle acquisition requirements for all new purchases or leases. The standard is accompanied by an innovative calculator that allows fleet managers to input desired vehicles and immediately see whether or not their acquisitions will meet the standard. DOER has hosted webinars and one-on-one trainings to help fleets understand and comply with the standard. The standard is currently undergoing revisions, expected to go into effect starting July 2022, that will prioritize energy efficiency through fleet electrification and help to operationalize the fleet acquisition requirements set forth in EO 594. The new standard will also issue scorecards to eligible entities detailing compliance with the FES and progress towards EO 594 ZEV fleet targets.

Executive Order 594 sets electrification targets and requirements for the state fleet, which includes vehicles owned and operated by executive branch agencies and public institutions of higher education, as well as the MBTA’s non-revenue fleet. EO 594 sets targets to increase the percentage of the state fleet comprised of zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs), such that 5% of the total fleet consists of Zero Emission Vehicles in fiscal year 2025, 20% in 2030, 75% in 2040, and 100% in 2050. To support these targets, the order sets zero-emission vehicle acquisition requirements. Starting July 1, 2022, all new acquisitions with a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of 8,500 lbs or less must be a ZEV; starting July 1, 2024, all new acquisitions with a GVWR of 14,000 lbs or less must be a ZEV; and starting July 1, 2029, all new acquisitions with a GVWR over 14,000 lbs must be a ZEV. To support the fleet electrification requirements, EO 594 also sets an EV charging station requirement such that 350 EV charging station are installed at state owned facilities by fiscal year 2025 and 500 EV charging stations installed by fiscal year 2030.

Additionally, two statewide contracts were developed and released to support fleet efficiency efforts. Managed by the Operational Services Division, contracts VEH110 for Light and Medium Duty Vehicles and VEH111 for Heavy Duty Vehicles and On-Road Construction prioritized electrification and efficiency during the contract development and bidder evaluation process in order to provide public entities with greater access to fuel efficient vehicles by ensuring an array of electric, hybrid, and alternative fuel vehicles are available for purchase by any state agency, campus, or municipality. Taking this a step further, VEH110 requires awarded vendors to offer only battery-electric, plug-in hybrid electric, or hybrid models for any sedan, minivan, or SUV listed on the contract. Through the various statewide contracts, there are now 20 full battery-electric models, 10 plug-in hybrid models, and 16 hybrid electric models available for purchase by any eligible entity (including all state and local government entities) in the Commonwealth.

In addition, the Advanced Vehicle Technologies statewide contract (VEH102) provides state and municipal entities access to a variety of electric vehicle charging station options, as well as after-market battery-electric vehicles, and idle reduction technologies.

Lastly, as the electric vehicle market transforms and requires new infrastructure to support these vehicles, LBE works with agencies and higher ed campuses to address opportunities to integrate electric vehicle charging stations at their facilities. Any state solar canopy project that receives funding from the LBE solar grant program must install at least 2 EV charging stations as well as provide pre-wiring for future station installations. As of May 2022, there are 290 electric vehicle charging stations at state facilities, including 262 level 2 chargers (460 distinct ports) and 22 DC fast chargers at 15 locations. Additionally, LBE has been working on technical documents to support agencies and campuses in their transition to EVs and EVSE, including a guidance document, procurement roadmap (to help navigate the complex selection, procurement and funding landscape), and an electric vehicle savings calculator to help easily compare the cost and emissions savings of EV options available on statewide contract.

Last Updated: June 2022

Michigan has committed to electrification of the state's vehicle fleet, starting with $10 million FY2023 budget proposal. However, no specific policy or target is in place or proposed.

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Reviewed: August 2022

Minnesota Statutes requires the state to reduce the use of gasoline by on-road vehicles owned by state departments by 25 percent by 2010 and by 50 percent by 2015, and the use of petroleum-based diesel fuel in diesel-fueled vehicles by ten percent by 2010 and 25 percent by 2015, using 2005 as a baseline. Per Executive Order 11-13, Minnesota’s state agency fleet now references the EPA’s Green Vehicle Guide for fuel economy and energy efficiency and requires an agency procuring a vehicle to choose one with a score of 7 or greater for leased vehicles.

Executive Order 19-27 includes updated sustainability goals that state cabinet agencies shall follow to improve their operational practices, including Reduced Fleet Fossil Fuel Consumption that specifies a 30% reduction of State Fleet consumption of fossil fuels by 2027 relative to a 2017 adjusted baseline.

Executive Order 19-27 includes a requirement to implement appropriate strategies to meet the State's Sustainability Goals while accomplishing core responsibilities, and this includes increasing the number of hybrid and electric vehicles in the State's fleet.

Last Updated: August 2022

Mississippi Code Sec. 25-1-77 requires that at least 75% of all vehicles in the State fleet must meet EPA fuel economy standards of 40 miles per gallon (MPG) for highway driving by July 1, 2014. Additionally, Sec. 25-1-77 states that the Office of Fleet Management must encourage the use of fuel efficient or hybrid vehicles, as well as alternative fuel vehicles, including ethanol, biodiesel, natural gas, and electric power. 

Last Updated: July 2020

Fuel Conservation for State Vehicles, Sections 414.400 - 414.417 RSMo, (in place since 1999) and the Federal Energy Policy Act establish opportunities for Missouri state agencies to manage transportation fuel consumption and promote the use of clean domestic alternative fuels. The Missouri statute seeks to increase the average fuel efficiency of the state fleet and increase the use of cleaner alternative transportation fuels in state vehicles. Each state agency, with assistance from the Department of Natural Resources (Division of Energy), shall develop and implement a vehicle fleet energy conservation plan for the purposes of reducing vehicle fuel consumption (414.403, RSMo). The Division of Energy and the Office of Administration are required to develop and implement a program to manage and progressively reduce state agency vehicle fleet consumption. Guidelines must be developed, updated, and revised every two years that require the overall vehicle fleet fuel efficiency for each agency to meet or exceed the fuel efficiency that would be achieved if each vehicle in the agency's fleet met the CAFE standard (414.400, RSMo). 

Last Reviewed: June 2022

Per Governor Initiative, the State of Montana has been directed to meet and is currently in compliance with federal CAFÉ standards. Through the Statewide Fleet System, Montana tracks CAFÉ ratings down to vehicle specific performance in an electronic Equipment Vehicle Management System (EVMS). Further per 2-17-416 MCA all new vehicles purchased meet current CAFÉ standards, unless there is a usage requirement exception.

Last Reviewed: June 2022

The state does not use the term “efficiency” in mandating fleet purchases. The state does require that more than 50 percent of the passenger fleet be intermediate, compact or subcompact: “After August 24, 1975, all state-owned vehicles that are passenger cars purchased, leased, rented, or approved for purchase, lease, or rent by the bureau shall be of the intermediate, compact, or subcompact class. Not less than fifty percent of such state-owned vehicles shall be of the compact or subcompact class unless the costs to operate and maintain such vehicles are not to the advantage of the state or such requirement fails to meet the intent of sections 81-1008 to 81-1025.”

Last Updated: July 2020

Nevada does not have a statewide energy-efficient fleet requirement.

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Reviewed: June 2022

Executive Order 2016-03 sets updated goals of reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the state passenger vehicle fleet by 30 percent on a metric-ton basis by 2030, as compared to a 2010 baseline. This executive order supersedes Executive Order 2011-01, which required every state agency to comply with the Clean Fleets Program (CFP).

The Clean Fleets policy is encouraging adoption of EVs for qualified state vehicle use.

Last Updated: August 2022

All state government fleets and certain businesses are subject to regulation under the 1992 Energy Policy Act (EPAct). Under the DOE website EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities, State vehicles are required to operate with increased energy efficiency standards. State vehicles are to utilize fuel types most appropriate for the vehicle by promoting alternative fuels such as compressed natural gas, propane, biodiesel, and ethanol to reduce the use of petroleum based fuels. State conduct under the following fleets will follow this regulation:

  • State of New Jersey
  • Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Port Authority of New York and New Jersey
  • Electric and gas utilities, and propane providers

The above regulations require fleet operators of light duty AFVs to maintain a pre-determined percentage of vehicles annually. Development of AFV infrastructure will serve as an improved compliance measure. Increasing fleet efficiency will reduce our carbon footprint in the State of New Jersey.

In the winter of 2019, NJ Department of Treasury issued a significant bid solicitation for passenger battery electric and hybrid vehicles, which will enable state government agencies to purchase vehicles for the first time. The Energy Master Plan sets forth a goal of seeking to transition its light-duty fleet to electrification as vehicles reach the end of their useful life, beginning in July 2020, if not sooner.

Through funding from NJBPU, non-profit Sustainable Jersey is also working with their Electric Vehicle Working Group to review their guidance for municipalities that participate in their programs (450 “Participating” municipalities and 203 “Certified” municipalities partner with Sustainable Jersey to advance various initiatives including energy efficiency).

The Sustainable Jersey Purchase Alternative Fuel Vehicle Action (aka guidance) is now updated to reflect technology changes and options for fleet procurement. They are also in contact with Sawatch, Electrification Coalition, and Nissan regarding potential outreach projects to promote municipal fleet adoption of electric vehicles.

In January 2020, Governor Phil Murphy signed legislation that requires the following for the State fleet: At least 25% of State-owned non-emergency light duty vehicles shall be plug-in electric by December 31, 2025; thereafter, 100% of these vehicles shall be plug-in electric by the end of 2035. By the end of 2024, at least 10% of new bus purchases made by NJ Transit will be zero emission busses, which will increase to 50% by the end of 2026 and 100% by the end of 2032. The Board of Public Utilities and Department of Environmental Protection are currently working to establish additional goals for medium-duty and heavy-dulty on-road diesel vehicals and associated charging infrastructure. The legislation also directs the DEP to report on the state of the plug-in electrical vehical market, the State's progress toward achieving the goals, identify barriers to achievement of the goals, and make recommendations for legislative or regulatory action to address barriers in New Jersey every five years.

Last Updated: August 2022

The Alternative Fuel Acquisition Act, signed into law in 2002 and amended in 2007, requires that 75% of vehicles bought by state agencies and educational institutions meet or exceed national CAFÉ standards, are hybrid vehicles, are capable of using alternative fuel, or are plug-in electric vehicles. The Energy Conservation and Management Division (ECMD) is required to compile the data, evaluate the effectiveness of the Act, and offer technical compliance support.
The state has an Alternative Fuels Programs Manager who coordinates reporting for statutory requirements related to transportation and promotes New Mexico-produced alternative fuels. The manager also promotes, coordinates, monitors, and implements state alternative fuel transportation programs that includes mass transit and petroleum reduction strategies. Additionally, the manager also co-leads a state agency transportation decarbonization team that meets bi-weekly. In the 2019 legislative session, the state’s General Services Department received $1 million in funding to purchase all electric vehicles (EV) for the state's fleet and $1.5 million for EV charging infrastructure to be deployed at state owned property.

Last Reviewed: June 2022

As part of the enacted FY2022 New York State Budget, schools are required to start purchasing or leasing zero emissions buses as of July 1, 2027, and operate a fully zero-emissions fleet by July 1, 2035. This new requirement includes contracted transportation services and authorizes school districts to finance zero-emission buses for up to 12 years, more than double the previous 5 year limit for diesel buses. In addition, as part of the Budget, the Office of General Services was awarded $17 million to convert state fleets to electric vehicles.

New York does not have an overall fleet efficiency standard or target; however, the state is partnering with municipalities to expand state and local ownership of electric vehicles. Additionally, NYSERDA and the NYPA are working with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to reduce its energy consumption. In 2018, the MTA set a goal of ramping up electric bus purchases over the next 10 years so that starting in 2029 it will only buy all-electric buses and have a 100% electric bus fleet by 2040. In January 2020, the State set a goal for five other major transit operators to convert 25% of their fleets to all-electric buses by 2025 and 100% of their fleets to all-electric buses by 2035. The State also promotes energy efficiency for state fleets through the GreenNY website, which focuses on “right-sizing,” limiting miles traveled, advanced fleet management tools, and electric vehicles, among other guidance on best practices.

State agencies are currently required to purchase or lease passenger vehicles, which have a fuel economy in the top 30% of their vehicle class as listed under EPA size class on the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maintained website, as per Executive Order No. 4 (2008), which was continued by Governor Hochul in Executive Order No. 6 (2021). A replacement draft Passenger Vehicle Green Purchasing Specifications is going through a public comment period. Once approved, agencies and authorities affected by Executive Order No. are required to rely upon the Green Purchasing Specifications in their procurements. In addition, the Department of Environmental Conservation and the Office of General Services conduct annual aggregate purchases for Zero Emission Vehicles from which state agencies can benefit.

New York is signatory to State Zero-Emission Vehicle Programs Memorandum of Understanding intended to increase purchases of new plug-in vehicles. From this, New York requires that 25% of light-duty non-emergency vehicle purchases be ZEVs by 2025, and government agencies install supporting charging stations.

A new law passed in 2021 (Chapter 423 of the Laws of 2021) will ban the sale of fossil fuel passenger cars and require that they be electric by 2035, which will facilitate a transition of the State’s vehicle fleet toward being fully electric. The law also contains a phase-in for other vehicle types, where feasible.

Last Reviewed: August 2022

The North Carolina Department of Administration must give purchase preference to new state vehicles with fuel economy ratings that rank among the top 15% of comparable vehicles in their class. 

A Fiscal Year 04-05 “special budget provision” required a 20% reduction (adjusted to 17.5 based on provision criteria) in petroleum use by the state vehicle fleet. The 2011 NC General Assembly extended this Petroleum Displacement Plan (PDP) requirement through FY 2016, allowing for a more robust comparison and foundation for petroleum reduction planning.

The State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Program requires covered fleets to either acquire alternative fuel vehicles (AFV) as a percentage of their annual light-duty vehicle acquisitions or to employ other petroleum-reduction methods in lieu of acquiring AFVs. DOE established these requirements through 10 CFR Part 490.

In October 2018, Governor Cooper issued Executive Order 80 (EO 80), directing an increase in the number of registered zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs) to at least 80,000 statewide by 2025. The DOA's 2019 Motor Fleet ZEV Plan under EO 80 identified 572 traditional vehicles for replacement with ZEVs that would save taxpayers an estimated $3.8 million and reduce emissions by over 22,000 metric tons over the lifetime of the vehicles.

Last Updated: July 2020

No policy in place or proposed

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Reviewed: June 2022

Executive Order 2007-02S ordered each state agency to reduce their fuel consumption. Ohio law (Revised Code Section 123.011 (F)(1)) requires each state agency to develop average fuel economy standards. Each state agency submits data to calculate average fuel economy, per each state agency. There are 47 state agencies that have fleets with a variety of vehicles, and the average fuel economy was 17.4 mpg in fiscal year 2009.

By executive order there is a requirement for continuous improvement, which effectively sets a default target to do better than the previous year (>17.4).

Last Reviewed: June 2022

No policy in place or proposed.

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Reviewed: June 2022

The Oregon Department of Administrative Services (the agency responsible for managing Oregon’s public agency vehicle fleet) has set a specific target for a 10% increase in average fleet miles-per-gallon by 2020, from a 2007 baseline. This target is included as an official Key Performance Metric (KPM) in the agency's Annual Performance Progress Report. According to Oregon's 2019 progress report, the 2019 average fleet miles-per-gallon average efficiency of 20.84 mgp was sufficient to exceed the target with an 11.3% increase over the 18.73 mpg, 2007 baseline. DAS has proposed updating this KPM to achieve another 10% increase in efficiency over the 2019 value by 2030. This proposed change is expected to be accepted by the Legislative Fiscal Office.

Additionally, the Oregon Department of Administrative Service’s Statewide Fleet Management Policy (#107-009-040) discusses fleet efficiency in two sections:

  • Regarding the efficient and economical use of state vehicles, underutilized vehicles are subject to reassignment or sale, and high-efficiency vehicles are prioritized for high-usage scenarios, where their comparative efficiency produces the greatest gains. 
  • For purchasing new vehicles, by 2025, a minimum of 25 percent of new light-duty state fleet purchases and leases for applicable uses, to the extent available, will be Zero Emission Vehicles (ZEV). If not available, then Alternate-fuel or Hybrid vehicles meeting the U.S. Energy Policy Act (EPACT) requirements. If not available, then Low-Emission (LEV) II standard gas vehicles. If not available, then standard gas vehicles.
  • Agencies must encourage adoption of ZEV’s and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by setting internal policies and processes such that, where a ZEV or LEV will work for state business travel needs, a ZEV or LEV will be the employee’s first choice. This applies to all state-owned vehicles, leased vehicles, or rental vehicles.
  • Agencies will follow DAS and Oregon Department of Energy (ODOE) recommendations for the purchase of the most economically feasible ZEV options. However, on a limited basis, agencies may invest in higher cost, newer types of ZEVs that may not have a favorable ROI in order to test emerging vehicle technologies.
  • Wherever possible and economically feasible, agencies will replace Internal Combustion Engine vehicles with ZEV or LEV options.

While not efficiency-focused, the Oregon Department of Energy had been recognized for its alternative fuel efforts.

In 2019, HB 1044 was signed into law which has unfunded mandates for state fleet electrification. HB 1044 requires that by 2025, 25% of all new light duty vehicles in the state fleet should be zero emmission vehicles.

Last Reviewed: August 2022

Executive Order 2019-01 sets a goal of 990 electric or plug-in electric hybrid vehicles to be introduced to the fleet by 2025 (25% of passenger cars). Progress toward meeting this target can be viewed on pages 11-12 of the PA GreenGov Council 2021 Annual Report. The PA DGS has instituted a driving tracking system (telematics) in their state vehicles. This system can track individual driving habits and locations. It is the expectation that this system will curtail unofficial usage/mileage and could identify inefficient drivers.

Last Reviewed: June 2022

Per the new Executive Order 15-17, the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance ("DCAMM"), within the Department of Administration, in coordination with OER, is developing strategies for reducing fossil fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions from the State fleet, with the goal of ensuring that a minimum of 25 percent of new light-duty state fleet purchases and leases will be zero-emissions vehicles by 2025.

The Zero Emission Vehicle Action plan indicates that in 2013, the governors of eight states, including Rhode Island, signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with a goal to reduce greenhouse gas and smog-causing emissions and foster energy independence. Collectively, these states committed to have at least 3.3 million ZEVs operating on their roadways by 2025. In Rhode Island, that goal is roughly 43,000 vehicles.

Executive Order 05-13 (August 22, 2005) requires that state fleet purchases of motor vehicles comply with the Energy Policy Act of 1992 by ensuring that a minimum of 75% of new vehicles purchased are alternative fuel vehicles and the remaining 25% are hybrid-electric vehicles. All new light duty-trucks in the state fleet will achieve a minimum of 19 mpg city for the fleet and be certified as at least a low-emission vehicle. All new passenger vehicles will achieve a minimum of 23 mpg city for the state fleet. The order also discourages the purchase of sport utility vehicles, calling on all state agencies to purchase the most economical, fuel-efficient and low emission vehicles appropriate to the mission. All state agencies must also purchase low rolling resistance tires with superior tread life for state vehicles when possible; and must be maintained according to manufacturer specifications, including specified tire pressures and ratings.

The Lead by Example initiative has given Rhode Island state government an opportunity to lead by example by increasing the number of zero-emissions and partial-zero-emission vehicles (electric, hybrid electric) and compressed natural gas vehicles in the State Fleet. As of May 2020, 30 vehicles have been ordered. Increasing the number of zero-emissions vehicles is a critical part of the State's goal to reduce both transportation related air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Electric, hybrid electric and compressed natural gas vehicles can help increase energy security, improve fuel economy, lower fuel costs, and reduce emissions.

Last Reviewed: June 2022

State agencies purchasing motor vehicles must give preference to hybrid, plug-in hybrid electric, biodiesel, hydrogen, fuel cell, or flexible fuel vehicles when the performance, quality, and anticipated lifecycle costs are comparable to other available motor vehicles.

Section 1-11-220 (e) requires the Division of Motor Vehicle Management to “acquire motor vehicles offering optimum energy efficiency for the tasks to be performed; 1-11-220 (g) requires it to “improve environmental quality in this State by decreasing the discharge of pollutants.”

Last Reviewed: September 2020

While South Dakota utilizes flex fuel vehicles and promotes the use of ethanol blends in fleet vehicles, the state does not have a statewide energy-efficient fleet requirement. 

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Reviewed: June 2022

Tennessee Code Annotated §4-3-1109 (Energy Efficient State Vehicles) establishes the goal that 100% of newly purchased passenger vehicles be energy-efficient vehicles or alternative fuel motor vehicles. An energy-efficient motor vehicle is defined as a passenger motor vehicle that is:

  • An alternate fuel vehicle as defined by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Public Law 102-486);
  • A flexible fuel vehicle (FFV) utilizing ethanol, biodiesel, or any other commercially available alternative fuel approved by the United States Department of Energy;
  • A hybrid-electric vehicle (HEV);
  • A compact fuel-efficient vehicle, defined as a vehicle powered by unleaded gasoline that has a United States EPA estimated highway gasoline mileage rating of at least twenty-five miles per gallon (25 mpg) or greater for the model year purchased;
  • An electric vehicle (EV);
  • A vehicle powered by natural gas; or
  • A vehicle powered by ultra- low sulfur diesel fuel that meets Bin 5, Tier II emission standards mandated by the EPA and that has an EPA estimated highway mileage rating of at least thirty miles per gallon (30 mpg) or greater for the model year purchased.

As of June 30, 2022, the State owned 1,444 energy-efficient passenger motor vehicles, including 1,266 FFVs, 4 HEVs, 4 EVs, and 170 energy-efficient vehicles with an average highway fuel economy of at least 25 MPG. Included in these totals are 36 passenger vehicles that were purchased during State Fiscal Year (FY) 2022 (July 1, 2021-June 30, 2022), all of which were energy efficient. The State met its target goal of purchasing 100% energy-efficient passenger vehicles in FY2022.

Furthermore, as most vehicle manufacturers are reducing their number of FFV offerings and are instead focusing on the release of new EV models, the Tennessee Department of General Services Division of Motor Vehicle Management is developing a state-wide EV implementation plan. This plan will examine infrastructure and Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) offerings to prepare for the vehicle industry changes that are underway.

Tennessee statute also requires that 25% of newly purchased passenger motor vehicles procured for use in areas designated by the EPA as nonattainment areas shall be hybrid-electric vehicles or vehicles powered by natural gas, provided that such vehicles and fueling infrastructure are available at the time of procurement and such vehicles are purchased at competitive prices. In the event that such vehicles or fueling infrastructure are not available at the time of procurement, the State may instead meet this mandate by procuring compact fuel-efficient vehicles.

In areas that are not designated by the EPA as nonattainment areas, the State shall ensure that at least 25% of newly purchased passenger motor vehicles are hybrid-electric vehicles, vehicles powered by natural gas, or compact fuel-efficient vehicles, provided that such vehicles are purchased at competitive prices. As of May 31, 2022, the only area designated by the EPA as nonattainment in Tennessee is Sullivan County (Sullivan County does not meet the 2010 Sulfur Dioxide National Ambient Air Quality Standard).

The State does not currently have electrification requirements for the State vehicle fleet. However, the State does currently own 4 EVs and in FY2021-2022, the State placed an order for an additional 15 all-electric Ford F-150 Lightning trucks, which will be utilized within the Tennessee State Parks vehicle fleet.

Additionally, as part of a five-year alternative fuel fleet strategy, TDEC’s Tennessee State Parks system will aim to replace 50% of prioritized, identified “Electric Candidate Vehicles” leaving service with commercially available EVs by June 30, 2024, and 100% of “Electric Candidate Vehicles” by June 30, 2027.

Last Updated: August 2022

In accordance with SB 700 of 2013, each state agency and institution of higher education is required to create a plan that sets a goal for reducing gasoline usage. Also, the State Vehicle Management Plan contains low-emission and alternative fuel vehicle purchase requirements.

The Office of Vehicle Fleet Management (OVFM) within the Statewide Procurement Division (SPD) is charged with the establishment and management of the state vehicle reporting system to assist agencies in the management of their vehicle fleets. The requirement to manage the state vehicle reporting system, in addition to the Vehicle Fleet Management Plan, is found in Chapter 2171, Subchapter C of the Government Code for Vehicle Fleet Services.

These directives address the OVFM responsibilities of establishing the vehicle reporting system to collect state agency fleet reports on inventory, operating costs and other related data. Additionally, OVFM monitors agency compliance with the state's alternative fuel program purchasing requirements, in accordance with Chapter 2158, Subchapter A, Government Code, and vehicle utilization information in accordance with Chapter 2203, Use of State Property, Section 2203.001.

TXDoT, the largest state fleet, is in the process of reducing its fleet by 37%.

Last Updated: July 2020

In 2014, Utah established a target for 50% or more of new or replacement division-owned state vehicles that are motor vehicles used for the transportation of passengers are motor vehicles with emissions that are equal to or cleaner than the standards established in bin 2 in Table S04-1, of 40 C.F.R. 86. 1811-04(c)(6), or any vehicle propelled to a significant extent using one of the following alternative fuels: electricity from an off-board source; natural gas; liquid petroleum gas; hydrogen; or biodiesel by August 30, 2018 (S.B. 99, 63A-9-403). As of June 2022, roughly 54% of passenger transport vehicles met this standard.

Because of this bill, the Utah Division of Fleet Operations (DFO) has recently chosen the Chevy Bolt EV as the State Standard Vehicle. The Bolt has a Tier 3 Bin 0 rating, exceeding the Tier 2 Bin 2 requirement from S.B. 99. If a department cannot accept this vehicle because its mission demands something else, they need to explain in writing why they cannot accept this vehicle. The outdated Tier 2 Bin 2 equivalent is the current Tier 3 Bin 30. The Toyota Prius Hybrid falls into this newer bin and is a favorite of DFOs for replacing older ICE vehicles. The Prius and EV vehicles will be heavily marketed to our lessees to help DFO meet S.B. 99’s requirements.

A significant constraint is that many of DFO’s passenger transport vehicles are minivans, SUVs, and larger vans that do not have production models meeting the EPA Tier 3 Bin 30 standards. In addition, obtaining sedans will be more challenging in the future, as the manufacturers are moving toward reducing the production of sedans and increasing SUV production. This shift in the production of types of vehicles will be a hurdle that could keep DFO and other fleets across the country from reaching similar low emission vehicle purchasing goals.

In 2018, the State of Utah secured state vendors for Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) installation for use at state buildings. This multi-vendor selection process will place several EVSE vendors under a state contract for both Level 2 charging and DC Fast Charging. As of June 2022, there have been 161 EVSEs installed across Utah containing 307 individual charging ports installed by the State of Utah departments of Transportation, Government Operations, and Environmental Quality.

In 2019, the Division of Fleet Operations’ Motor Pool sent two employees to Weber State University to learn how to service, diagnose and repair hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), and battery-electric vehicles (BEV) in an effort to better understand how the new vehicles would impact the vehicle fleet in the respective areas of serviceability and repair.

Last Reviewed: June 2022

As part of the Vermont Action Plan associated with the multi-state ZEV MOU, the state will “establish goals to ensure that a minimum of 25 percent of new light-duty state fleet purchases and leases, for applicable uses, will be ZEVs by 2025.”

Electrifying the state fleet addresses a key priority in Vermont's Zero Emission Vehicle Action Plan and in a Multistate Zero Emissions Vehicle Plan that Vermont has committed to help implement. These initiatives are fully described in the Comprehensive Energy Plan. Since 2007, Fleet Management Services has been purchasing plug-in hybrid vehicles for the motor pool. As of 2019, 25% of the vehicles in the state's central motor pool were all electric or plug-in hybrid electric vehicles; 28 of the 142 vehicles were EVs. While the overall number of vehicles has increased, the total number of plug-in electric vehicles has more than doubled.

State statute—23 V.S.A. § 4(85)—requires that not less than 75 percent of the vehicles purchased or leased be hybrid or plug-in electric vehicles, and the Department of Buildings and General Services has plans to upgrade EV charging capability accordingly.

Last Reviewed: June 2022

Executive Order 19, signed by Governor Bob McDonnell in July 2010, expired when the new Governor issued Executive Order 31 in October 2014. State vehicle fleet energy efficiency requirements are not addressed in EO 31. However, the Virginia Department of General Services includes in its policies and procedures guidelines for the purchase of fuel-efficient, low-emission state-owned vehicles, when practicable. In addition, DGS’s leasing vehicles guidelines encourage the use of compact, fuel-efficient, and low-emission vehicles.

The state included in the 2014 Virginia Energy Plan (VEP) a goal to increase the number of natural gas, propane, and electric vehicles in state and local government fleets to 300 by the end of 2017. Virginia’s fleet conversion program directs up to $9 million in federal Congestion Mitigation Air Quality (CMAQ) and state matching funds to pay the incremental costs of these vehicles. Vehicles that receive this funding must be garaged in areas that do not meet the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone, carbon monoxide, or particulate matter (nonattainment areas) and for former nonattainment areas that are now in compliance (maintenance areas). 

The Commonwealth also offers temporary “bridge” and long-term loans to state agencies and localities in both non-attainment and attainment areas, as well as loans for alternative fueling and electric vehicle charging infrastructure. These programs support the alternative fuel vehicle recommendation made by a working group of the Virginia Climate Change and Resiliency Update Commission.

Virginia Department of General Services includes in its policies and procedures guidelines for the purchase of fuel-efficient, low-emission state-owned vehicles, when practicable. Every state vehicle request begins as the smallest most fuel-efficient vehicle, and larger vehicles must go through additional justification documentation. In addition, DGS’s leasing vehicles guidelines encourage the use of compact, fuel-efficient, and low-emission vehicles.

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Reviewed: August 2022

Executive Order 21-04 (Zero Emission Vehicles), issued in 2021, requires state executive and small cabinet agencies to procure battery electric vehicles (BEVs) so that 40% of light duty fleets are BEVs by 2025, 75% by 2030, and 100% by 2035. The EO requires that medium and heavy duty fleets are 100% BEVs by 2040. The State Efficiency and Environmental Performance Office (SEEP) is responsible for implementing this EO in Partnership with the Department of Enterprise Services (DES). Other provisions in the EO include vehicle purchase exemption criteria, the development of statewide and agency-specific implementation strategies, and funding to install electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) at state facilities.

Washington state agencies must phase in fuel economy standards to achieve an average fuel economy of 36 miles per gallon for passenger vehicle fleets by 2015 (RCW 43.41.130). State agencies must purchase ultra-low carbon fuel vehicles or, when purchasing new conventional vehicles, achieve an average fuel economy of 40 miles per gallon (mpg) for light-duty passenger vehicles and 27 mpg for light-duty vans and sport utility vehicles. When calculating average fuel economy, emergency response vehicles, passenger vans with a gross vehicle weight rating of 8,500 pounds or greater, off-road vehicles, ultra-low carbon fuel vehicles, and vehicles driven less than 2,000 miles per year are excluded.

The largest fuel use in in State Government is the Washington State Department of Transportation ferry system. Washington State Ferries operates the largest ferry system in the United States. Washington State Ferries (WSF) is undertaking an ambitious initiative to move toward a “greener” ferry fleet with the twin goals of reliability and lighter environmental footprint. In a typical year, WSF burns more than 18 million gallons of diesel fuel, making the system Washington state’s largest diesel consumer. WSF is working on several projects to meet the goals of Gov. Jay Inslee’s Executive Order 20-01, which directs WSF to move toward a zero emissions fleet. The three main capital components of the electrification plan are: building new Olympic class hybrid-electric vessels, converting the existing three Jumbo Mark II vessels to hybrid-electric vessels, and developing terminal charging infrastructure.

The State Administrative and Accounting Manual (SAAM 12.20.30c) established rules regarding minimum annual days of use and mileage requirements for state-owned vehicles. The utilization requirement eliminates all non-essential and cost-inefficient state fleet vehicles. The most fuel inefficient vehicles were removed from the fleet and petroleum use reduced as a right-sizing result.

In addition to these requirements, EO 20-01 states that agency directors shall ensure that each lease or purchase of new vehicles shall prioritize battery electric vehicles (BEV) (or better emerging technology), and that all trips which could be feasibly made by BEVs shall be utilized.

Last Reviewed: June 2022

The W.Va. Purchasing Division includes an alternative fueling mechanism for every vehicle classification. Vendors are also required to provide the federal mpg for each vehicle classification, which is given bid award consideration.

Last Reviewed: August 2022

The Wisconsin Department of Administration's fleet management policy requires all state agencies to collectively reduce gasoline use by at least 20% by 2010 and 50% by 2015 in state-owned vehicles as compared to the total amount used in 2006. In addition, state agencies must reduce petroleum-based diesel fuel use by 10% by 2010 and 25% by 2015. The department shall, whenever feasible and cost-effective, encourage all state agencies to collectively reduce the usage of gasoline and diesel fuel in state-owned vehicles that is petroleum based by at least 20% for gasoline by 2015 and 10% for diesel by 2015 as compared to the total amount used in 2006. No further goals have been put into place since then.

The Governor issued Wisconsin's Clean Energy Plan with strategies for state government Lead-by-Example work. State agencies leadership aim to:

  • Contribute to the fulfillment of carbon reduction goals of the new U.S. nationally determined contribution (NDC) as part of the Paris Agreement (50-52 percent economywide net GHG emissions reductions below 2005 levels by 2030);
  • Develop energy efficiency, sustainability, and renewable energy standards for all new and existing state facilities, office buildings, and complexes;
  • Accelerate new and existing policies to reduce carbon pollution and promote clean energy deployment at the state level; and
  • Focus on priority areas and practices, such as environmental justice, energy consumption reduction, sustainable procurement, transitioning the fleet to clean fuels and zero-emission vehicles, reducing solid waste, and reducing water consumption.

Last Updated: August 2022

No policy in place or proposed

Note: For state efficient fleet initiatives, policies listed must make a specific, mandatory requirement for increasing state fleet efficiency. State alternative-fuel vehicle procurement requirements that give a voluntary option to count efficient vehicles are thus not included.

Last Reviewed: June 2022