State and Local Policy Database

Transportation System Efficiency

Sound land use planning is vital to support alternatives to driving in the United States. Energy-efficient transportation is inherently tied to the integration of transportation and land use policies, and for a state to reduce vehicle miles travelled, it must have an approach to planning that successfully addresses land use and transportation considerations simultaneously.

Transportation and Land Use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: No policy in place or proposed.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: The 2016 Alabama Statewide Freight Plan identifies the major transportation routes and infrastructure for road and rail freight, but it does not include efficiency performance measures. One innovative freight efficiency program the state has implemented is delivery space booking systems, which reserves a parking space for a specific vehicle to load or unload freight during a specific time period. The systems help reduce fuel consumption, environmental impacts, and network congestion, specifically in urban areas.

Last Reviewed: May 2020

Transportation and Land Use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: No policy in place or proposed.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: No freight plan or goals in place.

Last Reviewed: July 2020

Transportation and Land use Integration

Arizona passed the “Growing Smarter” Act in 1998 and the “Growing Smarter Plus” Act in 2000 to address sprawl-related issues and to provide communities the means with which to shape their future growth. These acts require that each municipality create and submit a comprehensive plan that reflects public opinion and also that each municipality submit their plan to regional planning offices. In 2007, the state established a "Governor's Growth Cabinet" to more effectively coordinate interagency spending and planning according to the principles outlined in the “Growing Smarter” Act. 

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: No policy in place or proposed.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: No finalized freight plan or goals in place.

Last Reviewed: July 2019

Transportation and Land use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: No policy in place or proposed.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: No freight plan or goals in place.

Last Reviewed: July 2019

Transportation and Land Use Integration: California has identified smart growth and transportation system efficiency strategies as a major component of its plans to implement AB32, which requires a 25% reduction from 1990 levels in greenhouse gas emissions by 2020. SB 375 (2008) requires the Air Resources Board (ARB), in consultation with the Metropolitan Planning Organizations, to set regional goals for greenhouse gas emissions from vehicles. Regional transportation plans will need to incorporate those targets, and Regional Housing Needs Assessments in turn will have to be aligned with the land use component of the transportation plans. SB 375 also relaxes the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) review process for housing projects that are consistent with plans to meet regional greenhouse gas reduction goals and ensures adequate inter-agency cooperation in the development of the regional plans. 

AB 900 (2011) and AB 246 (2017) provided CEQA judicial review streamlining for certain efficient projects. SB 99 & AB 101 (both 2013) created the Active Transportation Program; (ATP) consolidates existing federal and state programs (Transportation Alternatives Program, State Bicycle Transportation Account, and State Safe Routes to School).

SB 743 (2013) provided regulatory changes to support infill and transit-oriented development and requires a new VMT based process for transportation impacts assessment. SB 628 (2014) authorized local governments to establish financing districts for capital projects that include brownfield, transit priority, affordable housing etc.

SB 1 (2017) included over $800 million dedicated to Sustainable Communities Planning, active transportation, transit and rail etc. Several housing bills passed in 2017 included provisions to reduce regulatory burdens and encourage new development and infill within cities (link). California also conducts incentive programs as a key strategy to encourage sustainable, compact and accessible development, including: Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund (Transformative Climate Communities, Affordable Housing Sustainable Community, and Sustainable Agricultural Lands Conservation).

VMT Targets: AB 32 (2006) required the Air Resources Board to develop a Scoping Plan to reduce GHGs to 1990 levels by 2020. In 2010 ARB adopted targets, expressed as percent per capita changes in emissions for each region. Governor's EO B-30-2015 sets a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions target for 2030 at 40% below 1990 levels. In SB 32 (2016) codifies a 2030 GHG emissions reduction target of 40% below 1990 levels. In Climate Change Scoping Plan Update (2017) ARB identified the need for an additional 15% reduction in total statewide light-duty vehicle miles traveled (VMT) in 2050. In 2018 ARB updated the SB 375 (2008) regional targets for reducing GHG from passenger vehicle travel. This supports Governor Brown’s call in 2015 for California to reduce petroleum use in cars and trucks by up to 50% by 2030. These reductions are envisioned to be achieved in part by implementation of SB 375 targets and regional Sustainable Communities Strategies; the implementation of SB 743 (2013) changing transportation analysis using VMT (instead of vehicle delay) and additional State VMT reduction strategies.

Complete Streets: California also adopted AB 1358 in 2008, a bill that mandates municipalities to create long-term plans that incorporate “complete streets” goals for the physical development of their respective communities. From January 2011 onwards, city or county legislative bodies must “plan for a balanced, multimodal transportation network that meets the needs of all users of streets, roads, and highways, defined to include motorists, pedestrians, bicyclists, children, persons with disabilities, seniors, movers of commercial goods, and users of public transportation, in a manner that is suitable to the rural, suburban, or urban context of the general plan.” A major objective of complete streets requirements is to expand the use of non-auto modes of transportation and thereby help to reduce vehicle miles traveled.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: California has a freight plan that  not only meets the federal FAST Act requirements, but exceeds them by incorporating the sustainable freight strategies identified in California's Sustainable Freight Action Plan (CSFAP, 2016). The CSFAP establishes an aggressive goal to improve freight efficiency and transition the freight industry to near zero emissions by 2050 (Governor’s Executive Order B-32-2015).

California’s freight plans include the federal performance measure “truck travel time reliability on interstates”, which improves traffic flow and contributes to fuel efficiency as well as travel time saving. California has an additional metric "GDP/GHG" known as the emission intensity metric in the CSFAP to reduce emissions while promoting economic growth. California’s freight plans identify a multimodal freight network, and meeting the goal for the entire freight industry of near-zero emissions by 2050 calls for aggressive actions across all modes. 

Last Reviewed: July 2020

Transportation and Land use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No executive order, legislation, or mandate in place or proposed, but the Colorado Department of Transportation identified a FY 2020 goal to reduce VMT per capita by approximately 1% per year and expects to maintain this goal in future fiscal years. 

GHG Reduction Goal: HB19-1261 set GHG reduction goals of 26% by 2025, 50% by 2030 and 90% by 2050 (compared to a 2005 baseline). The Colorado GHG roadmap process is currently in progress with results and recommended GHG reduction measures to be presented to the State Air Quality Control Commission in Fall 2020.

Complete Streets: The state has implemented a complete streets policy (HB 1147) to promote the use of alternative transportation by providing a comprehensive network of roads and streets.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Colorado has a state freight plan, but it does not identify a multimodal freight network or include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals. The Colorado Department of Transportation, Colorado Energy Office, and other state partners have committed to working with the Freight Advisory Council and other industry stakeholders to collaboratively develop medium- and heavy-duty zero-emission vehicle goals, strategies, and resources for the freight and delivery sector by July of 2021 with the long-term goal of 100% MD/HD ZEVs.

Last Reviewed: September 2020

Transportation and Land use Integration: Connecticut’s Conservation and Development plan outlines six growth management principles that aim to coordinate future development and to provide valuable planning resources for municipalities across the state. These six principles outline, among other considerations, the need to redevelop and revitalize areas with existing infrastructure and to concentrate development around transportation hubs and corridors.

In 2008, the state senate passed SB 39, calling for the establishment of a Responsible Growth Cabinet to review “regionally significant projects” and to ensure that all future development occurs according to the six growth management principles.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: In 2009, the state adopted a complete streets policy (Public Act 09-154) to ensure that all road projects accommodate all users.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: In 2017, the state finalized its freight plan to comply with the FAST Act, which refers to its capital investments for multi-modal freight. 

Last Reviewed: July 2019

Transportation and Land Use Integration: Delaware has required local communities to submit comprehensive plans since the inception of the Shaping Delaware’s Future Act in 1995. In 2001, Delaware enacted the “Livable Delaware” initiative, which included legislation to provide funds and planning resources to municipalities for the creation of comprehensive growth plans. The initiative now includes a statute to establish a governor’s advisory council to coordinate development efforts and the creation of a realty transfer tax fund to finance the stewardship of undeveloped land in the state.

VMT Targets: While the state has not yet developed a target for VMT reduction or GHG reduction from the transportation sector, the Division of Climate, Coastal & Energy is currently developing a Climate Action Plan by December 2020 to support Governor Carney's climate policy. The Climate Action Plan will include goals for GHG reduction from the transportation sector, the work group developing the plan may include VMT goals. 

Complete Streets: In 2009, the state adopted a complete streets policy to promote safe and equal access for all users.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: The 2015 Delmarva Freight Plan has been approved by FHWA and adopted by all MPOs.

Last Reviewed: July 2020

Transportation and Land Use Integration: The District of Columbia's Zoning Regulations (DCMR Title 11) include numerous provisions to encourage sustainable, compact, accessible development. These include density bonuses in commercial corridors and downtown; reduction of parking requirements in transit-adjacent areas; numerous mixed-use zones; requirements for both short- and long-term bicycle parking; allowance of accessory dwelling units and small-scale commercial activity in lower-density residential zones. 

VMT Targets: Sustainable DC 2.0 (released April 2019) has a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from transportation by 60% by 2032 (compared to a 2006 baseline). Transportation emissions are measured annually in the GHG inventory.

Complete Streets: DC Department of Transportation has a complete streets policy in place that accommodates all modes of transportation in the maintenance and construction of roads.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: The District of Columbia has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: July 2019

Transportation and Land use Integration: Enacted during the 2019 Legislative Session, the Multi-use Corridors of Regional Economic Significance (M-CORES) Program is designed to advance the construction of regional corridors that will accommodate multiple modes of transportation and multiple types of infrastructure. The specific purpose of the program is to revitalize rural communities, encourage job creation in those communities, and provide regional connectivity while leveraging technology, enhancing the quality of life and public safety, and protecting the environment and natural resources.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: State Statute 335.065 mandates the incorporation of complete streets principles into road project planning and maintenance.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Florida has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

The Strategic Intermodal System (SIS) Policy Plan- is a statewide system of the highest priority transportation hubs, corridors, and connectors with a focus on moving people and freight between Florida and other states and nations and between regions within Florida. Reference: Section 339.61(2), Florida Statutes provides that it is the intent of the Legislature that the Strategic Intermodal System consist of transportation facilities and services that meet a strategic and essential state interest and that limited resources available for the implementation of statewide and interregional transportation priorities be focused on that system.

Last Reviewed: June 2020

Transportation and Land Use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: Georgia adopted a complete streets policy in 2012 to incorporate bicycle, pedestrian, and transit accommodations into transportation infrastructure projects.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Georgia has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: July 2019

Transportation and Land use Integration: In 1961 Hawaii become the first state to implement growth management legislation in the United States when it adopted the State Land Use Law. The purpose of the law was to limit development of scattered subdivisions which in turn led to poorly planned public amenities and increased conversion of prime agricultural land for residential uses. Administration of the regulation is overseen by the state Land Use Commission, which determines district boundaries and also approves the implementation of new development projects. All state lands are classified as one of four districts for the purpose of regulation: urban, rural, agricultural, and conservation.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: In 2009, the state adopted SB 718, which included complete streets language calling on county transportation departments to improve access and mobility for all pedestrians, bicyclists, transit users and motorists.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: No freight plan or goals in place.

Last Reviewed: July 2019

Transportation and Land use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: No policy in place or proposed.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Idaho has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: July 2020

Transportation and Land use Integration: Illinois adopted Public Act 095-065 in 2007 which mandates that planning for bicycle and pedestrian ways must be incorporated into state-funded transportation programs and plans. 

The state also adopted the Business Location Efficiency Incentive Act in 2007, which provides businesses located near affordable housing and transit with tax credits.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: Illinois Public Act 095-065 calls for full consideration to be given to bicycle and pedestrian facilities in the planning of road development.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Illinois has a state freight plan, but it does not identify a multimodal freight network nor include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: July 2019

Transportation and Land Use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: The state DOT has a complete streets policy in place to accommodate multiple modes of transportation on streets.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Indiana has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: July 2019

Transportation and Land use Integration: The state of Iowa enacted S.F. 2389 in April 2010. The bill requires state agencies and local governments that undertake land-use planning and resource management to plan for future growth so as to promote increased energy efficiency and the location of new and existing developments near transportation hubs. As a result, state, municipal and inter-agency coordination is required.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: No policy in place or proposed.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Iowa has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals. This state freight plan will be updated by July 2022 and energy efficiency performance measures will be considered. The plan will not include a modal balance target. 

Last Reviewed: July 2020

Transportation and Land Use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: No policy in place or proposed.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Kansas has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: July 2019

Transportation and Land use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: No policy in place or proposed.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Kentucky has a state freight plan, which the state updated in 2017 to meet federal requirements, and identifies its multimodal freight network, though does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: July 2019

Transportation and Land Use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: Louisiana’s complete streets policy, adopted in 2010, calls for “a comprehensive, integrated, connected transportation network for Louisiana that balances access, mobility, health and safety needs of motorists, transit users, bicyclists, and pedestrians of all ages and abilities.”

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Louisiana has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: July 2019

Transportation and Land Use Integration: Maine adopted a Growth Management Act in 1987 that aimed to encourage growth in certain areas of the state while also planning for and financing an efficient system of public facilities and amenities that would cater to added development. The Act also encouraged municipalities to plan for future growth by developing comprehensive local plans while keeping the regional impact in perspective. The state also implemented a complete streets policy in 2014 as a complement to their land use policies.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: Maine has a state DOT policy help ensure that all users of Maine’s transportation system—our customers—including bicyclists, pedestrians, people of all ages and abilities, transit users, and motor vehicle users, have safe and efficient access to the transportation system

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Maine has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: July 2019

Transportation and Land use Integration: Like Oregon, Washington, California and Massachusetts, the state of Maryland is a leader in the implementation of smart growth policy. In 1992, the state passed the Economic Growth, Resource Protection and Planning Act as a means to coordinate planning priorities amongst state, regional and municipal government. The act mandates the consideration of conservation practices and transportation in the creation of comprehensive plans.

Maryland’s Smart Growth program, initiated in 1997, aims to promote development near transit hubs and other centers of activity. Policies to encourage this development include focusing state spending on existing centers and areas designated for growth, limiting road expansion in favor of public transit and promoting urban redevelopment. In 2001, Maryland state general assembly dedicated $500 million to the upgrade of mass transit service and infrastructure.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: In 2005, Maryland implemented state code § 2-602, which requires that the needs of bicyclists and pedestrians be considered when creating transportation plans. All future plans must also ensure that pedestrian and bicycle access to transportation facilities are not negatively impacted.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Maryland has submitted the Maryland Strategic Good Movement Plan (the Plan) in accordance with the FAST Act and in November 2017 the Federal Highway Administration communicated that the plan contains all of the necessary elements (Link).

The plan includes energy efficiency performance measures for freight; specifically, the Plan has a highway freight-related performance metric that looks at "wasted fuel for trucks" (see page 56). In addition, Table 5-5 of the Plan shows Environmental Stewardship (page 62) by measuring traffic-related greenhouse gas emissions against a target of reducing emissions 40 percent below 2006 emissions by 2030 (page 62). A modal balance target was not identified in the Plan. 

Last Reviewed: June 2020

Transportation and Land Use Integration: The issuance of Executive Order 385 (“Planning for Smart Growth”) in 1996 led to the creation of a number of smart growth initiatives that targeted concentrated growth and the revitalization of urban centers. However, it wasn’t until 2000, when the state passed the Community Preservation Act, that smart growth planning was solidified in the law and a program was established to support communities’ preservation of open space. Massachusetts subsequently adopted Chapter 40R, the Smart Growth Zoning Law, which provides financial incentives for municipalities to increase density and build affordable housing in areas with good access to transit. The Commonwealth Capital program, initiated in 2005, applies several smart growth criteria to municipalities’ applications for state funding. 

VMT Targets: In 2009, the state implemented language from Chapter 90E, mandating the accommodation of biking and pedestrian traffic in future transportation construction plans. This was followed by the launch of Massachusetts Department of Transportation’s GreenDOT program aimed at reducing the state’s contribution of transportation sector greenhouse gas emissions. The Clean Energy and Climate Plan targets a 1.7% reduction in VMT.

Complete Streets: Massachusetts Chapter 90E provides for the accommodation of bicycle and pedestrian traffic in the planning, design, and construction, reconstruction or maintenance of any project undertaken.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Massachusetts has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals. The plan’s goals include balancing and diversifying the multi-modal freight system to prevent an over-reliance on truck shipping, reducing congestion and environmental impacts by moving goods shipments to rail and water networks, and enhancing economic development opportunities by improving the efficiency of freight movements. 

Last Reviewed: June 2020

Transportation and Land use Integration: The Michigan Planning Enabling Act of 2008 requires all municipalities to create comprehensive master plans as a guide for future development. In creating these plans, each municipality must consult with adjacent local governments to avoid conflicts in zoning and planning and must also coordinate with all state and federal governments responsible for programs that affect the economic, social and physical aspects of the respective municipality.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: In 2010, Michigan passed HB 135, creating a complete streets advisory council within the state Department of Transportation that was tasked with formulating a complete streets policy for the state by 2012. Municipalities must also address this complete streets policy before finalizing capital infrastructure projects.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Michigan has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals. 

Last Reviewed: May 2020

Transportation and Land use integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: In 2017, MnDOT voluntarily applied emissions goals (established under the Next Generation Energy Act) to the transportation sector in the Statewide Multimodal Transportation Plan and MnDOT Sustainability Report, and also included GHG targets for agency operations and for the state highway construction program (Link).

Complete Streets: Minnesota adopted a complete streets policy in 2013 and updated it in 2016.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Minnesota has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: April 2021

Transportation and Land Use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: In 2010, the Mississippi DOT adopted complete streets legislation to incorporate bicyclists and pedestrians into all road planning, design, construction and maintenance activities. 

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Mississippi has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: July 2019

Transportation and Land Use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: The Missouri General Assembly approved a concurrent resolution (HCR 23) in 2011 to support complete streets. In addition, 42 local governments/agencies have adopted Complete Streets policies in Missouri, and the Missouri Department of Transportation includes the following statement in its engineering policy guide (EPG): "Safe, convenient and well-designed transit and pedestrian facilities are essential to Missouri communities. Pedestrian safety needs to be considered on every MoDOT project, especially when pedestrians are expected in close proximity to roadway traffic."

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Missouri has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: June 2020

Transportation and Land use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: No policy in place or proposed.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: The state's freight plan is located here. There are no energy efficiency performance measures for freight. There is no modal balance target. 

Last Reviewed: June 2020

Transportation and Land Use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: No policy in place or proposed.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: No freight plan or goals in place.

Last Reviewed: June 2020

Transportation and Land use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: Assembly Bill 483 (AB 483), passed in the 2019 Nevada Legislature, directs the DMV to gather an odometer reading at the time of any original vehicle registration, registration renewal or vehicle sale.

Data from odometer readings will become part of vehicle history and will be used to compile reports of total miles driven for the Nevada Legislature. There are no fees, taxes or fines associated with this program. The pilot project runs through December 31, 2026.

Complete Streets: No policy in place or proposed.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Nevada has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: May 2020

Transportation and Land use Integration: The New Hampshire State Development Plan aims to maximize compact, sustainable developments across the state through the implementation of key smart growth principles in the project planning and execution stages.  The State’s nine regional planning commissions (RPCs), in collaboration with NH Dept. of Transportation (NHDOT), NH Dept. of Environmental Services, and other state and local government agencies completed work on A Granite State Future to help communities integrate planning across sectors and identify, share, and replicate successful projects.  In 2014 and 2015, the RPCs finalized Regional Plans in addition to  a Statewide Existing Conditions and Trends Assessment, a Housing Preferences Study and Regional Climate Change Assessments for Southern and Northern New Hampshire.

NH Revised Statutes Annotated Chapter 9-B declares “It shall be the policy of the state of New Hampshire that state agencies act in ways that encourage smart growth.” Section 9-B:4 Expenditure of State or Federal Funds states “All state agencies shall give due consideration to the state's policy on smart growth under RSA 9-B:2 when providing advice or expending state or federal funds, for their own use or as pass-through grants, for public works, transportation, or major capital improvement projects, and for the construction, rental, or lease of facilities. The intent of this action is that new investments and grants for existing sites and buildings in existing community centers will be given preference over investments in outlying areas where that is a practical solution for the use and community in question.”

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed. However, a 2016 Executive Order 2016-03 establishes a goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the state passenger vehicle fleet by 30 percent on a metric-ton basis by 2030, as compared to a 2010 baseline. The State Government Energy Committee, which is tasked with developing plans to comply with the Order, is promoting VMT reduction as an important component of meeting this target.

Complete Streets: A 2016 Legislative Study Committee created by Senate Bill 364 examined creation of a statewide Complete Streets Program.  The Study Committee found that Complete Streets programs provide a variety of benefits to communities and directed the NHDOT to work with stakeholders to: 1) create more formalized criteria to help prioritize Complete Streets-related project applications; 2) create a guidebook to aid municipalities in implementing Complete Streets including how to further encourage alternative modes of transportation; and 3) update guidelines to aid in the implementation of Complete Streets programs.  A number of New Hampshire communities have adopted and implemented Complete Streets policies and have created municipal Complete Streets planning and design guidelines.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: The FAST Act requires states to develop a freight plan to comprehensively address freight planning activities and immediate and long-range investments.  The NHDOT Statewide Freight Plan was approved by FHWA on February 11, 2019.  Additional information is available on the NHDOT project website.

Last Reviewed: July 2021

Transportation and Land use Integration: The New Jersey State Development and Redevelopment Plan aims to implement statewide planning objectives that encourage development in recognized city, town and village centers and a balance of conservation in rural areas to enhance the quality of life for residents. The plan is a cross-institutional effort to promote smart growth across the state, estimated to save as much as $2.3 billion in capital costs in the process, if fully implemented.  Unfortunately, implementation of the state planning effort has languished in recent years. As of August 2009, a required update to the State Plan was long overdue, the State Planning Commission was suffering from a lack of appointments and staff levels at the Office of Smart Growth continued to shrink.

The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) continues to run the New Jersey Future in Transportation (FIT) program in an effort to provide affordable and sustainable transportation solutions that break the sprawl cycle and integrate land use and transportation planning. The NJDOT also runs the Transit Village program which encourages transit-oriented development, and the Mobility and Community Form project, which helps communities plan future transportation and land use by preparing a Mobility and Community Form (MCF) Element that combines the circulation and land use elements of their master plans. NJDOT is currently completing signal optimization pilots to reduce congestion and emissions on various major highways throughout the State.

In January 2008, New Jersey passed the “Urban Transit Hub Tax Credit Act,” providing businesses that choose to locate in “urban transit hubs” – defined as the area in a one-half mile radius around rail stations -- with tax credits. This law was amended by the New Jersey Economic Stimulus Act of 2009, requiring businesses to invest at least $50,000,000 in a business or residential facility before it can earn tax credits that can be applied to corporate business taxes, insurance premiums tax or income tax.

On November 2, 2018, Governor Phil Murphy signed into law a bill requiring NJ TRANSIT to establish an office of real estate economic development and TOD. The purpose of the new office was to assess and develop recommendations for economic development and TOD opportunities for parcels of real property owned by NJ Transit. The hope is that the full inventory and emphasis on economic development within NJ Transit will generate more private-sector interest in developing agency-owned properties, ultimately creating a new revenue stream that could ease the burden on riders. Such development could, in turn, complement existing and contemplated TOD projects in both designated Transit Villages and in non-designated municipalities.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: The New Jersey DOT adopted a complete streets policy in 2009 to provide safe access and mobility to pedestrians, bicyclists, transit users of all ages and abilities through the planning, design, construction, maintenance and operation of new and retrofit transportation facilities.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: New Jersey has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals. One interesting efficiency measure in the state’s freight plan is the goal to move road freight traffic away from peak travel hours to take advantage of off-peak period roadway capacity and subsequently reduce idling and congestion.

Last Reviewed: June 2020

Transportation and Land use Integration: New Mexico does not have a statewide planning office with jurisdiction over local zoning decisions, thus these policies are determined at county or local levels.

VMT Targets: In September 2019, Governor Lujan Grisham announced that New Mexico will be proposing, adopting and implementing  clean car standards. The state is also currently developing a Transportation Action Plan and a Sustainable Infrastructure Action Plan which will address reducing vehicles-miles-traveled and reduce green house gas emissions.  The plan should reduce VMT by 15% per capita below 2015 levels by 2027.

Complete Streets: No policy in place or proposed.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: New Mexico has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: July 2020

Transportation and Land Use Integration: The State of New York encourages each municipality to create comprehensive plans for local development according to established procedure. Efforts are also being made to encourage inter-municipal cooperation and cooperation between municipalities and state agricultural districts when planning for future development.

In addition, in August 2010 the Smart Growth Public Infrastructure Policy Act was signed into law and took effect a month later as an amendment to Environmental Conservation Law. The Act is intended to minimize the unnecessary cost of sprawl development and requires State infrastructure agencies and authorities ensure that public infrastructure projects (including transportation, sewer and water treatment, water supply, education, and housing projects) are consistent with the relevant Smart Growth Criteria specified in the Act. In 2014, this Act was modified to add a resiliency criteria.

VMT Targets: In 2008, New York adopted a VMT reduction target of 10% in 10 years as a means of encouraging more energy-efficient transportation usage.

Complete Streets: In 2011, the state implemented a complete streets policy ensuring convenient access and mobility on the road network by all users of all ages.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: New York State Freight Plan was released in August 2019. The Plan is intended to provide a framework to address current and near-term state of good repair improvements for freight infrastructure, as well as a plan for mid-term needs and efficient long-term growth in the freight system. The goal-driven plan also identifies operational and policy issues to be addressed to ensure optimization of the State's essential highway freight network. It includes performance measures related to energy efficiency including tracking the number of registered clean fueled freight vehicles and equipment. The projects identified through this planning process will help alleviate idling and make the freight system more efficient, complementing Governor Cuomo's GHG reduction efforts.

Last Reviewed: November 2020

Transportation and Land use Integration: Senate Bill 897 established the Sustainable Communities Taskforce to encourage the creation of sustainable communities with access to transportation alternatives

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: In 2009, the state DOT adopted a complete streets policy. 

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: North Carolina has a Multimodal Statewide Freight Plan approved by the State Board of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration.

Last Reviewed: July 2020

Transportation and Land Use Integration: The state of North Dakota passed House Bill 1340 in December 2009 mandating metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) to develop, in cooperation with the state and public transit operators, transportation plans and programs for metropolitan areas. These plans must include transportation measures that promote inter-modal transportation development and efficient transportation systems while minimizing transportation-related fuel consumption. Transportation plans must also comply with government-approved comprehensive growth plans.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: No policy in place or proposed.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: North Dakota has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Updated: July 2017

Transportation and Land use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: No policy in place or proposed.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Ohio has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: July 2019

Transportation and Land Use Integration: Smart growth strategies in Oklahoma have been adopted on a local basis (Link). 

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: No policy in place or proposed.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Oklahoma has a state freight plan in accordance with FAST requirements. Oklahoma has adopted Freight Goals in line with National Freight Goals, including improving the efficiency of freight movement and promoting clean fuel use by freight providers. The OFTP also includes a performance measure related to access of clean fuel basing it on number of CNG and EV stations within 5 miles. The plan adopts Multimodal freight strategies by 6 goal areas. The proximity to multimodal facilities measure includes a calculation of number of multimodal facilities within 75 miles. Link

Last Reviewed: May 2020

Transportation and Land use Integration: Oregon has a long history of leadership on land use planning. Oregon has stringent regulations regarding the creation and use of comprehensive plans in land-use planning. The State Department of Land Use and Conservation regulates local governments, special districts and state agencies undertaking land-use changes. Each municipality must develop a local comprehensive plan and all plans must be based on the state’s 19 planning goals, which include improving upon existing transportation facilities and providing effective transportation and mass transit facilities for high-density communities. 

OAR 660-024 requires each city in Oregon to have an Urban Growth Boundary, or UGB. A UGB is used to designate where a city expects to grow over the next 20 years. Cities may amend their UGB as needed to accommodate city growth. The use of UGB’s, and the review process for UGB expansion helps to control sprawl and preserve Oregon’s agriculture, forest, and open space.

OAR 660-044 requires support for MPO areas to conduct scenario planning activities. Scenario planning is intended to be a means for local governments in metropolitan areas to explore ways that urban development patterns and transportation systems would need to be changed to achieve significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from light vehicle travel.

TGM Planning Grants is a joint DLCD and ODOT program to help local jurisdictions plan for streets and land to lead to more livable, sustainable, and economically vital communities. This planning increases opportunities for transit, walking and bicycling. https://www.oregon.gov/lcd/TGM/Pages/Planning-Grants.aspx

A Local Improvement District (LID) is a special public improvement area created under State of Oregon statutes. These statutes allow for public financing of public improvement projects that benefit private property. The eligible category of public improvements is quite broad and includes most major types of construction. Typical use of an LID is to install sanitary sewers, storm drainage, water lines, streets and sidewalks (Link).

VMT Targets: Oregon has a statewide greenhouse gas reduction goal set in ORS 468A.205. The goal is cumulative for all sectors, transportation is a major component of achieving the goal. OAR 660-044 sets targets for MPO areas to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from light vehicle travel, these targets are consistent with the state goal. 

​In March 2020, Governor Brown issued Executive Order 20-04 which increased the greenhouse gas reduction goals in ORS 468A.205 to at least 45% below 1990 emission levels by 2035, and 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. 

Complete Streets: ORS 366.514 requires the inclusion of facilities for pedestrians and bicyclists wherever a road, street or highway is built or rebuilt

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Oregon has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: June 2020

Transportation and Land use Integration: The state planning statute does not mandate or authorize smart growth measures like Oregon's urban growth boundaries, or Florida's concurrency requirement, or the smart growth investment areas Maryland had for a time. But research reports have touted several Pennsylvania initiatives as smart growth – brownfields reuse program, farmland preservation program, Growing Greener programs, and the cooperative multi-municipal planning enabled by the state planning code. 

PA does not mandate integration of transportation and land use planning, but provides publications and staff TA promoting it, and PennDOT has provided UPWP and special projects funding for corridor planning and other efforts to better coordinate/integrate planning. PennDOT issued a policy, titled PennDOT Connects, in December 2016.  This policy was incorporated into PennDOT’s design manuals in 2018.  PennDOT Connects is PennDOT’s policy commitment to collaborative planning in the transportation planning process. PennDOT Connects requires collaboration with Metropolitan and Rural Planning Organizations staff and local government planners/staff on all proposed projects during planning. Collaboration provides the opportunity for details unique to communities, including current and planned land use considerations, to be identified and discussed for each project in planning, prior to developing project scopes and cost estimates.

VMT Targets: In January 2019 Governor Tom Wolf issued Executive Order 2019-01 Commonwealth Leadership in Addressing Climate Change and Promoting Energy Conservation and Sustainable Governance. The executive order directs state agencies to evaluate opportunities to reduce vehicle miles traveled. Additionally, Pennsylvania has committed to partner with the Transportation Climate Initiative and potentially cap and reduce carbon emissions from the transportation sector.

Complete Streets: A comprehensive complete streets policy was adopted by the state DOT that mandates that highway and bridge projects must evaluate the needs of pedestrians and bicycle users.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals:  In August of 2016, PennDOT's first Comprehensive Freight Movement Plan was submitted to FHWA. The plan does not include a modal balance target, nor does it include energy efficiency performance measures for freight. The Comprehensive Freight Movement Plan includes a range of Focus Areas related to Energy Efficiency. Several examples of these Focus Areas include:

• Focus on improving truck bottleneck locations
• Prepare for connected and autonomous vehicles and new technologies
• Address access and mobility issues for all modes, including intermodal connectivity
• Prioritize and enhance intermodal connections (“first and last mile”)
 
Last Reviewed: June 2020

Transportation and Land Use integration: In 1988, Rhode Island passed the Comprehensive Planning and Land Use Regulation Act, making comprehensive planning mandatory for municipalities. In 2000, an Impact Fee Act was passed to ensure that new growth did not financially burden existing tax payers and that adequate facilities were built to support new or rapidly growing development. The state also revised its State Land Use Plan in 2006, incorporating a number of recommendations and policies to discourage urban sprawl. Chapter 31-18-21 of state code directs the department of transportation to provide for the accommodation of bicycle and pedestrian traffic in the planning, design, construction and reconstruction of state highways and roads.

The State's Land Use 2025 Plan provides guidance for the integration of transportation into land use planning across the State, with recommendations for creating accessible public transportation hubs and ensuring maintenance of exisiting transit corridors and infrastructure. This emphasis on smart transportation growth, maintenance and repair of exisiting infrastructure, and focus on accessibility and equity is also included in the State's Transportation Improvement Plan.

VMT Targest: Rhode Island recognizes the need for reducing the number of VMT to curb emissions from the transportation sector and has included actions to accomplish this in its land use and transportation plans. In the Transportation Improvement Plan the Transportation Alternatives Program allocates funding to a number of initiatives that can help curb VMT, like pedestrian and bicycle lane creation, increasing access to public transit, and boosting non-vehicle mobility across the State.

The Land Use 2025 Report recommends an emphasis on higher density development that is supported by efficient and accessible public transportation as a means of reducing usage on existing transportation infrastrucure and by extension, reducing VMT. Additionally, Rhode Island is participating in the regional Transportation Climate Initiative, which through its implementation will set up a cap and invest program for transportation emissions that will allow Rhode Island to reduce VMT and invest program proceeeds into accessible, low-carbon transportation options.

Complete Streets: Chapter 16 and Chapter 31-18 of Title 24 outline the state's complete streets policy.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Rhode Island has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: June 2020

Transportation and Land Use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: In 2003, South Carolina adopted complete streets legislation to accommodate bicycling and walking facilities DOT planning activities. 

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: South Carolina has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: July 2019

Transportation and Land Use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: No policy in place or proposed.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: No policy in place or proposed.

Last Reviewed: July 2019

Transportation and Land Use Integration: Tennessee's Multimodal Access Grant provides support to the transportation needs of transit users, pedestrians, and bicyclists through infrastructure projects that address existing gaps along state routes and access at transit hubs.

The 25-Year Long-Range Transportation Policy Plan provides the foundation for prioritizing transportation investments across the State. The updated plan will aid in accomplishing TDOT's mission to serve the public by providing the best multimodal transportation system in the nation. TDOT's 25-Year Long-Range Transportation Plan allows TDOT to make key long-term funding and policy decisions about transportation investments throughout Tennessee today and in the future. A major outcome of this two-year comprehensive effort is a mid-term, 10-Year Strategic Investment Program. 

TDOT is currently in the process of revamping its transportation demand management (TDM) program, Smart Commute. This program focuses on the state’s largest urban areas, Knoxville, Chattanooga, Nashville, and Memphis. The program’s goal is to increase the efficiency of transportation systems by reducing single occupant vehicle trips through increased use of transportation alternatives (i.e., transit, carpools, vanpools, biking, walking, and teleworking). TDOT will be working with regional TDM programs, which offer education and outreach opportunities to encourage employers and commuters alike to take alterative commute options. TDOT is also developing performance measures to begin tracking the progress of the TDM programs and is updating the Smart Commute webpage to reflect all relevant program changes. The Smart Commute Webpage is in the process of migrating to the State’s broader Team TN site. 

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: In 2010, Tennessee adopted a bicycle and pedestrian policy that mandates transportation planning agencies and developers to integrate provisions for bicycles and pedestrians into the new construction and the reconstruction of roads and highways.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: The Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) developed a Tennessee Statewide Multimodal Freight Plan under MAP-21 that was revised to meet FAST Act state freight plan requirements; this plan was approved by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) in March of 2018. A summary of how this plan meets FAST Act state freight plan requirements is available in Appendix 1. The plan does not include energy efficiency performance measures. The plan also does not include a modal balance target, but does speak to efforts focused on freight diversion (the diversion of freight truck traffic to other modes, such as rail or water).

Additionally, TDOT recently update the Statewide Rail Plan. A primary objective of this plan is to “encourage rail transport, which provides for the efficient movement of freight while reducing energy consumption and highway congestion by reducing truck traffic.”

Last Reviewed: July 2020

Transportation and Land use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: The Texas Department of Transportation has released guidelines requiring the inclusion of acccommodations for bikers and pedestrians in all road projects. 

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Texas has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals. One interesting aspect of this plan is the emphasis on project selection criteria in the planning process that support and prioritize funding of first and last mile connectors in locations with regional, statewide and national significance, including both urban and rural connectors.

Last Reviewed: May 2020

Transportation and Land Use Integration: The Transportation and Land Use Connection (TLC) program is a partnership between the Wasatch Front Regional Council (WFRC), Salt Lake County, Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT), and Utah Transit Authority (UTA). The TLC program provides technical assistance to local communities to help them achieve their goals and plan for growth. The program helps communities implement changes to the built environment that reduce traffic on roads and enable more people to easily walk, bike, and use transit. This approach is consistent with the Wasatch Choice Vision and helps residents living throughout the region enjoy a high quality of life through enhanced mobility, better air quality, and improved economic opportunities. Source.

Utah’s Inland Port development has included air quality impacts as a key initiative to address through increased infrastructure development. The Inland Port Authority will use funds to encourage, incentivize, or require development with reduced environmental impact and to develop and implement zero-emissions logistics. Additionally, the Authority will fund and support a community enhancement program to address the impacts of development and inland port uses on adjacent communities. Source.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Utah has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: June 2020

Transportation and Land Use Integration: The state of Vermont enacted Act 250 in 1970 as a means to implement a permitting system to limit urban sprawl and inefficient development. In 1988, the state passed a growth management act to provide local municipalities with the necessary resources and funds to plan adequately for the future. The growth management act also served to coordinate state, regional and local efforts to target sound development practices. All local development plans must abide by 16 rules outlined in the Municipal and County Government statutes (link).

VMT Targets: 30 VSA §218c requires the publication and adoption of a Comprehensive Energy Plan. The 2016 CEP sets a goal to (1) maintain per-capita VMT remain at or below 2011 levels, (2) reduce VMT through transportation choices and increasing transportation efficiency, and (3) reduce GHG by increasing the share of renewable energy in the transportation sector to 10% by 2025 and to 80% by 2050.

Complete Streets: Vermont statutes include complete streets legislation that orders any construction or reconstruction project to allocate space for pedestrian and bicycle friendly pathways unless those additions are deemed prohibitively expensive.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Vermont has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals. Vermont is one of the few states to include a comprehensive discussion of freight sector performance measures and offer a proposal for implementation.

Last Reviewed: June 2020

Transportation and Land Use Integration: Virginia’s Planning, Subdivision of Land, and Zoning Code (Title 15.2, Chapter 22) requires every locality to undertake a comprehensive plan that coordinates land-use planning and future actions in order to effectively implement zoning requirements. Local governments are in charge of controlling growth while the state ties use of discretionary funds to the implementation of sustainable growth practices.   Virginia's long-range statewide plan, VTrans2040 includes improved coordination between transportation and land use as one of its guiding principles.  It has goals to promote accessible and connected places to improve access to jobs, services, and activity centers. It also promotes sustainable communities that encourage healthy lifestyles and works to expand travel options while protecting environmental and community resources. Virginia's transportation SMART SCALE prioritization of transportation projects includes Environmental Quality and Land Use Coordination as evaluation measures. [http://www.vasmartscale.org/].  Virginia’s statute §15.2-2223.1 encourages localities to identify and designate growth areas that might be: (i) appropriate for higher density development due to proximity to transportation facilities, the availability of a public or community water and sewer system, or developed areas; and (ii) to the extent feasible, to be used for redevelopment or infill development.

Virginia’s performance-based planning methods provide a mechanism to identify unique needs associated with such areas and provides a funding mechanism in the form of § 33.2-353.  In addition, the General Assembly passed a law in 2020 (HB 585) that requires localities above a certain size to consider incorporating strategies into their comprehensive plans to promote transit-oriented development for the purpose of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. 

VMT Targets: Virginia has no established or proposed targets; however, Virginia’s adopted long-range transportation plan, VTrans2040, includes a general objective to reduce per capita VMT. 

Complete Streets: The state has had a complete streets policy in place since 2004. 

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Virginia has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.  The Commonwealth has a freight plan that focuses on “Making sure that Virginia’s freight rail system is modern and has sufficient capacity to meet demand is critical to maintaining a balanced transportation system”.

Last Reviewed: June 2020

Transportation and Land use Integration: Washington State has long been a leader with respect to smart growth initiatives. In 1990, the state passed the Growth Management Act (GMA) aimed at targeting the uncoordinated and unplanned sprawl that threatens the environment and quality of life in Washington. The GMA establishes state goals, compliance deadlines and advice on the preparation of local comprehensive plans without overriding the authority of local and regional governmental institutions. As of February 2000, 92% of local communities mandated to plan fully for future growth had adopted comprehensive growth plans.

VMT Targets: Washington has also established an ambitious state VMT reduction target (RCW 47.01.440) that aims to reduce VMT per capita by 18% in 2020, 30% in 2025 and 50% by 2050 relative to 1990 levels. 

Complete Streets: Chapter 257, written into law in 2011 establishes a complete streets grant program and incorporates complete streets principles into construction and retrofit projects. 

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Washington has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: May 2020

Transportation and Land Use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: On April 10, 2013, West Virginia Legislature passed Senate Bill No. 158, the Complete Streets Act. This policy promotes the consideration of all forms of transportation when designing roads and highways in West Virginia.  

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: No finalized freight plan or goals in place. 

Last Reviewed: July 2019

Transportation and Land Use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: Wisconsin enacted clean streets legislation in 2009, mandating that all new highway construction include walkways and bikeways. Funding for such additions can be taken from appropriated state and federal transportation dollars. 

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: No finalized freight plan or goals in place. 

Last Reviewed: July 2019

Transportation and Land Use Integration: No policy in place or proposed.

VMT Targets: No policy in place or proposed.

Complete Streets: No policy in place or proposed.

FAST Freight Plans and Goals: Wyoming has a state freight plan that identifies a multimodal freight network, but it does not include freight energy or greenhouse gas reduction goals.

Last Reviewed: July 2019