State and Local Policy Database

Lansing

City Scorecard Rank

n/a

Lansing, MI

Scored out of 100Updated 10/2020
Community-Wide Initiatives
Community-Wide Climate Mitigation and Energy GoalsList All

Climate Mitigation Goal

Lansing adopted a goal to achieve carbon neutrality by 2050, with an interim reduction goal of 59% by 2030, using a 2019 baseline. ACEEE was unable to project if the city will achieve its near-term community-wide GHG emissions reduction goal because insufficient GHG emissions data were available for our analysis.

Energy Efficiency Goal

We did not find information regarding a community-wide energy reduction goal for the city.

Renewable Energy Goal

We did not find information regarding a community-wide renewable energy goal for the city.

Last updated: August 2023

Equity-Driven Approaches to Clean Energy Planning, Implementation, and EvaluationList All

Equity-Driven Community Engagement

We were unable to determine whether relevant decision-makers have taken a unique and expanded approach in conducting engagement for multiple clean energy initiatives with marginalized groups compared to engagement with other city constituencies.

Equity-Driven Decision-Making

We were unable to determine if the city has created a formal role for marginalized community residents or local organizations representing those communities to participate in decision-making that affects the creation or implementation of a local energy, sustainability, or climate action plan.

Equity Accountability Measures

We were unable to determine whether the city has adopted specific goals, metrics, or protocols to track how multiple energy, sustainability, or climate action initiatives are affecting local marginalized groups. 

Last updated: August 2023

Clean Distributed Energy ResourcesList All

We could not verify if the city has adopted a formal policy, rule, or agreement that supports the creation of clean distributed energy systems.

Last updated: August 2023

Adaptive Mitigation List All

Heat Island Mitigation Policies and Programs

We were unable to determine if the city has adopted specific policies or programs that incorporate requirements or incentives to mitigate the urban heat island effect. 

Resilience Hubs

We were unable to determine if the city has supported the creation of resilience hubs that incorporate clean energy resources and are sited in disadvantaged communities.

Last updated: August 2023

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Workforce DevelopmentList All

Workforce development for disadvantaged workers

We could not determine if city has partnered with a local education institution, labor union, or community-based organization to create, support, and/or incentivize the development of clean energy workforce development initiatives that target training and support services for potential or existing workers from disadvantaged communities to obtain and keep in-demand jobs.

Workforce development for the broader community

We could not determine if city has partnered with a local education institution, labor union, or community-based organization to create, support, and/or incentivize the development of clean energy workforce development initiatives that target training and support services for potential or existing workers from the broader community to obtain and keep in-demand jobs.

Outcomes tracking

We could not determine if the city has instituted a mechanism to measure the performance and/or success of equitable workforce development initiatives focused on the clean energy sector.

Last updated: August 2023

Buildings Policies
Building Energy CodesList All

Overview

The State of Michigan requires its local jurisdictions to comply with the 2015 Michigan Energy Code. The state-based the Michigan Residential Code on the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings. However, the state amended the 2015 IECC, weakening it to 2012 IECC levels. The State of Michigan currently requires commercial buildings to comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2013. To learn more about Michigan’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with the Michigan Energy Code. The city’s zEPI score for its commercial energy code is 50.3.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the Michigan Energy Code. The city’s zEPI score for its residential energy code is 49.5.

Solar-readiness policies

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted policies requiring new construction to be solar-ready.

EV-readiness policies

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted policies requiring buildings to be EV-ready.

Low-energy use requirements

We could not find information on whether the city sets low-energy use requirements for municipal or certain private buildings.

Electrification policies

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted any electrification policies.

Last Update: September 2023

Building Energy Code Compliance and EnforcementList All

We were unable to determine the amount of staff effort dedicated to energy code enforcement. The city requires plan reviews and site inspections and allows performance testing to verify energy code compliance. The city's Building Safety Office provides on-demand support to developers and/or owners for energy code compliance. 

Last Update: September 2023

Policies Targeting Existing BuildingsList All

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

The city is currently in the developing stages of a benchmarking policy.
 
Incentives
 
Lansing's public utility, Board of Water and Light, offers solar and energy efficiency rebates and incentives for home and business owners.
 

Program outcomes

The city's utility collects data on its incentive or financing programs to understand participation rates and allocation of program benefits among disadvantaged communities

 
Last Update: September 2023
 
Transportation
Sustainable Transportation Planning List All

Sustainable Transportation Plan

Lansing's Sustainability Action Plan was released in 2022 and includes sustainable transportation strategies.

VMT/GHG Targets and Stringency

The City of Lansing does not have a codified VMT or transportation GHG reduction target.

Progress Achieved Toward VMT/GHG Targets

The City of Lansing does not have a codified VMT or transportation GHG reduction target, and therefore cannot make progress toward the target.

Last Updated: September 2023

Location Efficiency List All

Location Efficient Zoning Codes

In 2021, the City of Lansing modified its zoning code to allow multifamily development and mixed-use development in all commercial zones by-right. 

Parking Requirement

Lansing has eliminated parking minimums in the DT-3 (downtown core area) district.

Location Efficiency Incentives and Disclosure

The City of Lansing does not have location-efficient development incentives or disclosure policies.

Affordable Housing around Transit

The City of Lansing does not require, preserve, or incentivize the development of affordable housing near transit.

Last Updated: September 2023

Mode Shift List All

Mode Shift Targets

The City of Lansing does not have a codified mode share target.

Progress Achieved Toward Mode Shift Targets

The City of Lansing does not have a codified mode share target, and therefore cannot make progress toward the target. 

Subsidized Access to Efficient Transportation Options

We were unable to find information on programs or policies subsidizing access to efficient transportation for disadvantaged groups.

Last Updated: September 2023

Public Transit List All

Transit Funding

The transit entities that serve the City of Lansing have received $32,527,284.80 on average annually between 2017 and 2021 from local sources. That equates to roughly $110.64 per capita between 2017 and 2021 within the service area. 

Access to Transit Services

The AllTransit Performance Score measures a given community's transit access and performance. The score considers connections to other routes, access to jobs, service frequency, and the percent of commuters who ride transit to work. The City of Lansing's AllTransit Performance Score is 5.8, scoring 1 point in the City Scorecard.

Last Updated: September 2023

Efficient VehiclesList All

Efficient Vehicle Purchase Incentives

Neither the City of Lansing nor the local utility provide incentives for purchasing efficient vehicles.

Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Incentives

The Lansing Board of Water and Light, the municipal utility serving the City of Lansing, offers rebates of $500 to $1000 on the purchase of a level 2 EV charger for single-family homes. Commercial and industrial property owners can also receive rebates of $4500 per Level 2 charging station.
 

Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Requirements

The City of Lansing does not require new developments to install EV charging stations.

EV Charging Ports

The City of San Francisco has 41.7 vehicle charging ports per 100,000 people available for public use.

Electric School Bus Goal

Neither the City of Lansing nor the local school district have set an electric school bus goal.

Electric Transit Bus Goal

Neither the City of Lansing nor the local transit agency have set an electric transit bus goal.

Last Updated: September 2023

Freight System EfficiencyList All

Sustainable Freight Plans

The City of Lansing does not have a sustainable freight plan or freight mobility plan in place, nor is it pursuing any freight efficiency strategies.

Open Data Portals

The City of Lansing does not have an open data portal with real-time freight data.

Last Updated: September 2023

Community Energy Infrastructure
Community Energy Infrastructure Summary List All

City of Lansing Board of Water and Light is is the municipal utility which provides electricity and drinking water services to the city of Lansing. Consumers Energy an investor-owned utility (IOU), is the largest natural gas utility serving Lansing. 

Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency SavingsList All

In 2021, Lansing BWL  reported 20,932 MWh of net incremental electric savings at the meter across the utility’s entire service jurisdiction, not only Lansing. In 2021, Lansing BWL spent $4,189,414 on electric energy efficiency programs.

In 2021, Consumers Energy reported 205,211,774 Mcf of natural gas savings while spending $69,166,854 and serving 2,003,053 customers cross the utility’s entire service jurisdiction, not only Lansing. 

Low-Income & Multifamily EE Programs List All

The BWL “Hometown Help” Low Income Program provides eligible customers in single-family and multifamily homes with a free energy assessment, education in energy efficiency and behavioral guidance, along with free installation of LED bulbs. If applicable, the program will also replace and recycle older refrigerators, dehumidifiers, and room air conditioners with ENERGY STAR™ models at no cost.

Two design parameters were key in the establishment of the Hometown Help Low Income Energy Efficiency Program:

No Cost- participating customers are not required to pay for products and services included in the program.

Convenient- program is designed to minimize the requirements for participation and make it easy for qualified customers to get help.

The City of Lansing has a 47% rental population, tenants and landlords are also offered the Hometown Help energy assessment through the BWL Multi-Family program. This energy assessment is at no cost, and ENERGY STAR refrigerator replacement is also offered at no cost (a previous requirement for a 25% co-pay was waived during the pandemic, including 2021). There was specific outreach conducted for this program in 2021, which was made to registered landlords by the City of Lansing’s housing ombudsman. This has resulted in more low-income occupied residences getting efficient refrigerators that lower electric bills.

Michigan Energy Options (MEO) is the implementation contractor for managing program delivery, including hiring and training staff, subcontractors, inputting data, verifying installations, and invoicing and reporting. 

In 2021 Lansing BWL reported 432,751 kWh in savings for their low-income programs while serving 1,373 customers and spending $267,149.

Consumers offers the Single Family IQ program offers access to incentives to facilitate whole building retrofits.  Customers work through their local non-profit(NPO)/community action agency (CAA) to apply for premium measures (insulation, furnace, water heater replacements).  The NPO/CAA will first utilize their funding to complete upgrade.  If a cap is hit then the utility will provide incentives to cover the remaining cost.  On the multifamily side, whole building incentives are available for property owners to apply for that pertain to tenant units and common area space and include the measured listed to the left.

The Consumers Energy’s Income-Qualified Energy Efficiency Assistance Program consists of various residential initiatives serving households that meet the income criteria of being at or below 200% of the federal poverty level (FPL) or 80% of AMI.  This program aids single-family, income-eligible Consumers Energy customers to reduce energy consumption and improve comfort in their home. It offers no-cost direct services that include energy efficiency upgrades, home energy assessments and energy-saving education.

The Consumers Energy Multifamily Energy Efficiency Program consists of various offerings for customers that meet the eligibility requirements for the program. Multifamily is defined as properties containing 3+ units under a single roof.  Income qualified is defined as 66% of tenants living at or under 200% of the federal poverty level or 80% of AMI.  This program offers direct install of free products including: LED bulbs, pipe wrap, showerheads and faucet aerators.  The program also provides access to prescriptive measures for HVAC, lighting, water heating and building envelope.  Any projects that do not qualify under the prescriptive measures can also apply for a custom project were the savings are calculated based on actual energy savings. Customers are also eligible to receive an assessment which identifies recommendations and measures that customers may take advantage of energy efficiency upgrades in their properties.

In 2021 Consumers reported saving 263,862 Mcf with their low-income program while serving 10,666 and spending $ 14,300,558.

Provision of Energy Data by UtilitiesList All

Lansing BWL does not provide automated benchmarking services for multitenant commercial and/or multifamily buildings.

Consumers Energy does not provide building managers with automated benchmarking data  for multitenant commercial or multifamily buildings. 

Decarbonization and Climate Change Mitigation Efforts of Cities and Energy UtilitiesList All

Clean Distributed Energy Resources 

We could not verify if the city has adopted a formal policy, rule, or agreement that supports the creation of clean distributed energy systems. 

Municipal Renewable Energy Procurement 

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite municipal renewable energy systems installed by Lansing.  

City Renewable Energy Incentive and Financing Programs 

Lansing's public utility, Board of Water and Light, offers solar and energy efficiency rebates and incentives for home and business owners. 

Last Updated: September 2023

Efficiency Efforts in Water ServicesList All

BWL is the local water utility for Lansing, MI. The BWL Hometown Help program, which is part of BWL’s residential energy efficiency programs, provide free of charge energy savings kits to participants. One of the items provided in these kits is a high efficiency shower head for customers that currently have electric water heaters.  

Local Government Score:
Local Government Climate and Energy Goals List All

Climate Change Mitigation Goal 

The city of Lansing set a goal to reduce local government GHG emissions 100% by 2040. 

Energy Reduction Goal 

We could not find any information regarding a local energy reduction goal for Lansing. 

Renewable Electricity Goal 

We could not find any information regarding a municipal renewable energy goal for Lansing. 

Last Updated: November 2023

Procurement and Construction Policies List All

Fleet Policies and Composition

Lansing’s Green Power Purchasing Policy “mandates that city facilities purchase EPA ENERGY STAR certified appliances and hybrid/renewable fuel vehicles unless an otherwise demonstrable need exists.” We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition. 

Public Lighting

While Lansing has not adopted the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance, the City does have an exterior lighting ordinance with requirements to limit light pollution. Approximately 75% of Lansing’s streetlights have been converted to LED. 

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if Lansing has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.  

Last Updated: October 2023
Asset Management List All

Building Benchmarking

The City has started to benchmark its facilities, but they are still in the process of acquiring all data and adding sites.

Comprehensive Retrofit Strategy

We were unable to find information regarding a comprehensive retrofit strategy in Lansing.

Municipal Employee Transportation Benefits

We were unable to determine whether Lansing provides reduced-emission transportation benefits to municipal staff.

Last update: February 2024