State and Local Policy Database

Energy Code Stringency

Mandatory building energy codes are a foundational mechanism for improving the efficiency of new buildings and buildings undergoing significant remodeling. National model codes are adopted by at the state or local level through legislative or regulatory action. Some states may set the building code standard for all of the local jurisdictions within the state, while, in other “home rule” states, municipalities are able to adopt their own building codes. Some states encourage adoption of more stringent building codes or alternative compliance paths by local jurisdictions. This sub-category includes city-specific information on the two major building energy codes:

  • Commercial The commercial energy code authority available to the local jurisdiction under state law; the jurisdiction’s use its available authority; the commercial building code in place in the jurisdiction and its IECC/ASHRAE edition equivalency; commercial energy code-related advocacy by the jurisdiction at the state-level.
  • Residential – The residential energy code authority available to the local jurisdiction under state law; the jurisdiction’s use its available authority; the residential building code in place in the jurisdiction and its IECC edition equivalency; residential energy code-related advocacy by the jurisdiction at the state-level.

Overview

The State of New Mexico allows local jurisdictions to adopt energy codes more stringent than the state’s code. Albuquerque has not adopted a stretch code. New Mexico requires residential and commercial properties to comply with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). To learn more about the building energy code requirements for the State of New Mexico, please visit the State Policy Database.

 Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with the 2009 IECC. The code uses a commercial zEPI score of 69.5.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the 2009 IECC. The code uses a residential zEPI score of 67.8.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last updated: March 2019

The State of Virginia requires its local jurisdictions to follow the 2012 Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code (USBC) for residential and commercial construction. As of July 14, 2014, the USBC was updated to reference the 2012 IECC and 2012 IRC. Residential buildings must comply with the 2012 IRC, while commercial buildings must comply with 2012 IECC standards with reference to ASHRAE 90.1-2010. To learn more, please see the Virginia page of the State Policy Database.  

Commercial

Commercial construction in Arlington County complies with the Virginia USBC. Arlington's Chief Code Official serves as Vice Chair of the IECC Commercial Committee and advocates for more stringent commercial building energy codes.

Residential

Residential construction in Arlington County complies with the Virginia USBC. Arlington works with site plan multifamily projects to voluntarily build beyond code.

Last Updated: May 2017

Overview

The State of Georgia is a home rule state in which jurisdictions may set their own building energy codes. The state has made two optional building codes available to any jurisdiction to adopt, the 2011 Georgia State Minimum Standard Energy Code and the 2011 Georgia State Minimum Residential Green Building Standard. The residential section of this code is based on the 2009 IECC, and the commercial section is based on ASHRAE 90.1-2007. To learn more about the Georgia building codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Although local authority is permitted, Atlanta has not made any amendments to the state building codes with respect to commercial buildings. The code uses a commercial zEPI score of 66.9.

Residential

Although local authority is permitted, Atlanta has not made any amendments to the state building codes with respect to residential buildings. The code uses a residential zEPI score of 67.7.

Solar- and EV-ready

Atlanta has adopted code provisions required residential and non-residential development install EV-ready infrastructure. We could not find information on whether the city has adopted solar-ready ordinances.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Colorado is a home rule state with a voluntary building code for both residential and commercial construction. To learn more about the building energy code requirements for the State of Colorado, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Aurora requires commercial properties comply with the 2015 IECC. The code uses a commercial zEPI score of 53.6.

Residential

Aurora requires residential properties comply with the 2015 IECC. The code uses a residential zEPI score of 54.7.

Solar- and EV-ready

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted solar- and/or EV-ready ordinances.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview 

The State of Texas allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes more stringent than the Texas Building Energy Code. The minimum state standard for single-family residential construction must comply with the 2015 International Residential Code (IRC). All other residential and commercial building construction must comply with the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). State-funded building construction must comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2013. To learn more about the building energy code requirements for the State of Texas, please visit the State Policy Database

Commercial 

In February 2007, the city council passed the Austin Climate Protection Plan, calling for the drafting of new building codes consistent with reducing energy use in all new buildings by 75%.  The 2015 City of Austin Energy Code is based on the 2015 IECC with amendments according to program targets. It took effect in September 2016. The city council adopted Resolution 20081106-048 in November 2008 setting a series of energy efficiency improvement goals for the city's existing residential and commercial buildings. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 52.3.  

Residential  

In February 2007, the city council passed the Austin Climate Protection Plan, calling for the drafting of new building codes consistent with reducing energy used in single-family homes by 65% by 2015. The 2015 Austin Energy Code is based on the 2015 IECC with amendments according to program targets. It took effect in September 2016. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 58.4.  

Solar- and EV-ready  

The city council requires all new residential and solar projects be solar-ready through Resolution No. 20170202-040. Austin provides residential solar-ready guidelines to help applicants and reviewers determine compliance with the ordinance. The city does not mandate projects to be EV-ready.  

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

California requires all buildings to meet statewide codes, but grants local jurisdictions the authority to adopt more stringent codes. To learn more about building energy codes in California, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Bakersfield requires CalGreen for commercial buildings. The code uses a commercial zEPI score of 49.1.

Residential

Bakersfield requires CalGreen for residential buildings. The code uses a residential zEPI score of 58.1.

Solar- and EV-ready

California state code will require solar system installation on all new residential construction beginning in 2020. California’s Green Building Requirements require residential and nonresidential building owners incorporate EV-charging infrastructure into the property.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Maryland is a home rule state and allows local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes that are more stringent than the minimum state requirements, or to suit their local conditions. Maryland requires that at a minimum, residential and commercial construction must comply with the 2015 Maryland Building Performance Standards, which are equally as stringent as the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). To learn more about the required building codes for the State of Maryland, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Baltimore has adopted the 2015 Maryland Building Performance Standards for commercial construction into the Baltimore County Building Code with local amendments The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 55.3.

Residential

Baltimore has adopted the 2015 Maryland Building Performance Standards for residential construction into the Baltimore County Building Code with local amendments. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 55.9.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Alabama allows local jurisdictions to adopt more stringent codes than the state mandated energy codes. The 2015 Alabama Residential Energy Code references to the 2015 IECC, however, state-specific amendments weaken it significantly. The 2015 Alabama Commercial Energy Code is based ASHRAE 90.1-2013. To learn more about the building energy codes in Alabama, please view the State Policy Database

Commercial

Birmingham has not adopted a stretch code. Birmingham adheres to the Alabama Commercial Energy Code. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 53.9.

Residential

Birmingham has not adopted a stretch code. Birmingham adheres to the Alabama Residential Energy Code. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 63.4.

Solar- and EV-ready

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted solar- and/or EV-ready ordinances.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

Massachusetts law requires statewide adoption of each new International Energy Conservation Code edition within one year of its publication. Massachusetts adopted the 2015 IECC for commercial and residential buildings. Massachusetts allows its local jurisdictions to upgrade their energy codes with a state-determined stretch code, which Boston adopted. By adopting the statewide stretch code, the city requires new buildings to exceed the base energy code by 20%. The adoption also designates Boston as a Green Community

Commercial

The city does not have the authority to adopt its own commercial energy code. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 49.8.

Residential

The city does not have the authority to adopt its own residential energy code. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 48.9.

Solar- and EV-ready

The City of Boston’s EV Policy requires 5% of parking spaces to host electric vehicles chargers and requires an additional 10% to be EV-ready. The city has not adopted a solar-ready policy.

Last updated: March 2019

The State of Colorado is a home rule state meaning local jurisdictions may set their own building codes for both residential and commercial construction. Localities which choose to set a building code must comply with the 2003 IECC at a minimum. To learn more about the building energy codes for the State of Colorado, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

The City of Boulder has established the IECC 2012/ASHRAE 90.1-2010 as the required commercial building energy code. The city amended the code to require a 30% increase in performance requirements. At this time, Boulder has not begun to advocate at the state level for increased stringency in building energy codes.

Residential

The City of Boulder has established the 2012 IECC along with the Green Building Green Points Program as the required residential building energy code. At this time, Boulder has not begun to advocate at the state level for increased stringency in building energy codes.

Last Updated: January 2017

Overview

The State of Connecticut requires cities to adhere to state-adopted commercial and residential energy codes. Connecticut adopted the 2015 IECC with state amendments in 2018. To learn more about the building energy code requirements for the State of Connecticut, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties must adhere to the 2015 IECC with state amendments. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 55.0.

Residential

Residential properties must adhere to the 2015 IECC with state amendments. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 53.9.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of New York allows local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes more stringent than the New York State 2010 Energy Conservation Construction Code (NYSECCC). The NYSECCC incorporates the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), ASHRAE 90.1-2013, and the 2016 Energy Code supplement. As stated in the Five Cities plan, the City of Buffalo enforces the NYSECCC. To learn more about the building energy code requirements for the State of New York, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties must adhere to the 2015 IECC, per the NYSECCC. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 56.5.

Residential

Residential properties must adhere to either the 2015 IECC or ASHRAE 90.1-2013, per the NYSECCC. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 53.4.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last updated: March 2019

The State of Vermont requires local jurisdictions to follow the state-mandated building energy codes. Residential construction must follow the 2015 Residential Building Energy Standards (RBES), which references the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code with amendments. Commercial construction must follow the 2015 Commercial Building Energy Standards (CBES) which references the 2015 IECC with amendments. The CBES also allows an alternative compliance path of ASHRAE 90.1 2013 with Vermont specific amendments. To learn more about Vermont’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial buildings in Burlington comply with the 2015 CBES. The City of Burlington has not yet begun to advocate to the state for increased stringency in commercial building energy codes.

Residential

Residential buildings in Burlington comply with the 2015 RBES. The City of Burlington has not yet begun to advocate to the state for increased stringency in residential building energy codes.

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of North Carolina requires local jurisdictions to comply with the state mandated building energy codes. All buildings must comply with the 2012 North Carolina Energy Conservation Code, which is more stringent than the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and the ASHRAE 90.1-2010. To learn more about the building codes and requirements for the State of North Carolina, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Carrboro complies with the North Carolina Energy Conservation Code. We did not find information regarding Carrboro’s advocacy for increased stringency in commercial building energy codes.

Residential

Residential construction in Carrboro complies with the North Carolina Energy Conservation Code. We did not find information regarding Carrboro’s advocacy for increased stringency in residential building energy codes.

Last Updated: January 2017

Overview

The State of North Carolina requires local jurisdictions to comply with the state mandated building energy codes. All buildings must comply with the 2012 North Carolina Energy Conservation Code, which is more stringent than the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and the ASHRAE 90.1-2010. To learn more about the building codes and requirements for the State of North Carolina, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Charlotte complies with the North Carolina Energy Conservation Code The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 63.6. Charlotte has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in commercial building energy codes.

Residential

Residential construction in Charlotte complies with the North Carolina Energy Conservation Code. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 64.6. Charlotte has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in residential building energy codes.

Solar- and EV-ready

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted solar- and/or EV-ready ordinances.

Last updated: March 2019

The State of Virginia requires its local jurisdictions to follow the 2012 Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code (USBC) for residential and commercial construction. As of July 14, 2014, the USBC was updated to reference the 2012 IECC and 2012 IRC. Residential buildings must comply with the 2012 IRC, while commercial buildings must meet 2012 IECC standards with reference to ASHRAE 90.1-2010. To learn more, please see the Virginia page of the State Policy Database.  

Commercial

Commercial construction in Charlottesville complies with the Virginia USBC.  Charlottesville submitted public comments in support of commercial building energy codes upgrades during the code change rulemaking-process.

Residential

Residential construction in Charlottesville complies with the Virginia USBC. Charlottesville submitted public comments in support of residential building energy codes upgrades during the code change rulemaking-process.

Last Updated: January 2017

Overview

The State of Illinois allows local jurisdictions to adopt energy codes more stringent than the state’s. Currently, both the state and the City of Chicago follow the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code for commercial and residential buildings. The state has formally adopted the 2018 International Energy Conservation Code for both residential and commercial, and the Code is set to take effect in March 2019. To learn more about building energy codes in Illinois, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Chicago complies with the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code for all commercial buildings. The city adopted an amendment to the 2015 IECC to include a cool roof requirement. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 53.4.

Residential

The city complies with the 2015 IECC for all residential buildings. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 59.3.  

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not adopted a formal policy mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV- ready.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of California requires all buildings to meet statewide codes, but grants local jurisdictions the authority to adopt more stringent codes. To learn more about building energy codes in California, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

The city requires commercial buildings comply with CalGreen. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 49.1.

Residential

The city requires residential buildings comply with CalGreen. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 58.1.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city adopted a solar-ready ordinance for residential buildings in 2009. California state code will require solar system installation on all new residential construction beginning in 2020. California’s Green Building Requirements require residential and nonresidential building owners incorporate EV-charging infrastructure into the property. 

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Ohio has set mandatory building energy codes statewide. The Ohio Board of Building Standards adopted the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and ASHRAE 90.1-2010 with amendments for commercial buildings. Ohio based its energy code for residential buildings on the 2009 IECC. To learn more about Ohio’s building energy code requirements, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial buildings in Cincinnati comply with the state mandated codes. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 59.0. The city actively monitors state level discussions concerning building codes, advocates for improvements and participates in the 2018 IECC voting process.

Residential

Residential buildings in Cincinnati comply with the state mandated codes. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 68.6. The city actively monitors state level discussions concerning building codes, advocates for improvements and participates in the 2018 IECC voting process.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not adopted a formal policy mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV- ready.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Ohio has set mandatory building energy codes statewide. The Ohio Board of Building Standards adopted the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and ASHRAE 90.1-2010 with amendments for commercial buildings. Ohio based its energy code for residential buildings on the 2009 IECC. The city advocates to the state for more stringent energy codes through the Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance.  To learn more about Ohio’s building energy code requirements, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties must adhere to the 2012 IECC and ASHRAE 90.1-2010 with amendments. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 59.0.

Residential

Residential properties must adhere to the 2009 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 68.6.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not adopted a formal policy mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV- ready.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Ohio has set mandatory building energy codes statewide. The Ohio Board of Building Standards adopted the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and ASHRAE 90.1-2010 with amendments for commercial buildings. Ohio's energy code for residential buildings is based on the 2009 IECC. To learn more about Ohio’s building energy code requirements, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial buildings in Columbus comply with the state mandated codes. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 59.0. The City of Columbus testifies at state board meetings for increased stringency in the commercial building energy codes and participates in the 2018 IECC voting process.

Residential

Residential buildings in Columbus comply with the state mandated codes or the 2009 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 68.6. The City of Columbus testifies at state board meetings for increased stringency in the residential building energy codes and participates in the 2018 IECC voting process.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not adopted a formal policy mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV- ready.

Last updated: May 2019

Overview

The State of Texas allows its local jurisdictions to adopt and amend the Texas Building Energy Code.  All residential and commercial building construction must comply with the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). To learn more about the Texas’s building energy code, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Effective September 2016, commercial buildings in Dallas must comply with the Dallas Energy Conservation Code that incorporates the 2015 IEEC with amendments. In March 2017, Dallas amended the code to include an alternative compliance path for buildings meeting ENERGY STAR program certification.  The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 53.7.

Residential

The Dallas Energy Conservation Code incorporated the 2015 IECC for residential construction effective September 2016. In March 2017, Dallas amended the code to include an alternative compliance path for buildings meeting ENERGY STAR program certification.  The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 59.8.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not adopted a policy mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV- ready.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Colorado is a home rule state meaning local jurisdictions may set their own building codes, if they choose to, for both residential and commercial construction. Localities that choose to set a building code must comply with the 2003 IECC at a minimum. The 2016 Denver Building Code includes the 2015 IECC with city-specific amendments. Denver participated in the ICC voting process for the 2018 IECC.

Commercial

Denver has adopted the 2015 IECC with local amendments. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 52.3.

Residential

Denver has adopted the 2015 IECC with local amendments. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 53.4.

Solar- and EV-ready

Denver requires single- and two-family homes to be EV-ready. The city does not have a solar-ready requirement.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Michigan requires its local jurisdictions to comply with the 2015 Michigan Energy Code. The state based the Michigan Residential Code on the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings. However, the state amended the 2015 IECC, weakening it to 2012 IECC levels. The State of Michigan currently requires commercial buildings to comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2013. To learn more about Michigan’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with the Michigan Energy Code. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 50.3.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the Michigan Energy Code. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 57.0.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not adopted a policy mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV- ready.

Last updated: March 2019

The State of Iowa has set mandatory building energy codes for its local jurisdictions, but also allows loyalties to adopt stretch-codes that are more stringent than the mandated state codes. All residential construction must at least comply with the 2012 IECC. Commercial construction must at least comply with the 2012 IECC and the ASHRAE90.1-2007. To learn more about Iowa’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database

Commercial

Although local permitting is allowed, Dubuque uses the minimum commercial building energy codes set by the state.

Residential

Although local permitting is allowed, Dubuque uses the minimum commercial building energy codes set by the state.

Last Updated: January 2017

Overview

The State of Texas allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes more stringent than the Texas Building Energy Code. The minimum state standard for single-family residential construction must comply with the 2015 International Residential Code (IRC). All other residential and commercial building construction must comply with the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). State-funded building construction must comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2013. To learn more about the building energy code requirements for the State of Texas, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with the 2015 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 53.7.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the 2015 IECC with local amendments. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 58.4.

Solar- and EV-ready

El Paso has adopted mandatory solar-ready provisions for residential construction. The city has not adopted a policy mandating new construction be EV-ready.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Texas allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes that are at least as stringent as the Texas Building Energy Code. The minimum state standard for single-family residential construction must comply with the 2015 International Residential Code (IRC). All other residential and commercial building construction must comply with the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). State-funded building construction must comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2013. To learn more about the building energy code requirements for the State of Texas, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Fort Worth based its Energy Code for commercial buildings on the 2015 IECC with amendments. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 53.7. The Code permits ENERGY STAR certification as an alternative compliance option.

Residential

Fort Worth based its Energy Code for residential buildings on the 2015 IECC with amendments. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 59.8. The code permits ENERGY STAR certification as an alternative compliance option.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Michigan has statewide requirements for residential and commercial buildings. We did not find information regarding city advocacy for state improvement in residential or commercial energy codes. To learn more about the building codes and requirements for the State of Michigan, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction must comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2007. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 50.3.

Residential

Residential construction must comply with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 57.0.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Connecticut requires residential and commercial buildings to comply with the Connecticut State Building Code. The state’s code references the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). To learn more about the required building codes for the State of Connecticut, please visit the State Policy Database

Commercial

Commercial buildings must comply with the Connecticut State Building Code. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 55.0.

Residential

Residential buildings must comply with the Connecticut State Building Code. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 53.9.

Solar- and EV-ready

Hartford’s subdivision regulations and zoning code include solar- and EV-ready provisions. Section 32 of the city’s subdivision regulations requires developers to orient buildings to optimize exposure to passive solar benefits and to maximize generation from a future or current solar energy system. Section 7.2.2.D of the city’s zoning code mandates the number of EV-charging stations required per development type.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Nevada allows local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes at the municipal level. Nevada has adopted the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) with state amendments for residential and commercial buildings. To learn more about the building codes and requirements for the State of Nevada, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties in Henderson must comply with the 2012 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 53.3.

Residential

Residential properties in Henderson must comply with the 2012 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 52.8.

Solar- and EV-ready

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted solar- and/or EV-ready ordinances.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Hawaii requires all counties to adopt the Hawaii Energy Code in 2015. The code adopted the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and ASHRAE 90.1-2013 with state-specific amendments. To learn more about Hawaii’s building energy code requirements, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties must adhere to the 2006 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 75.4.

Residential

Residential properties must adhere to the 2006 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 75.0.

Solar- and EV-ready

The State of Hawaii passed a mandate requiring all new residential construction install a solar water heater. The city has not passed an EV-ready mandate.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Texas allows its local jurisdictions to adopt and amend building energy codes that are at least as stringent as the Texas Building Energy Code. The minimum state standard for single-family residential construction must comply with the 2015 International Residential Code (IRC). All other residential and commercial building construction must comply with the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). State-funded building construction must comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2013. To learn more about Texas’s building energy code requirements, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Houston adopted the 2015 IECC for commercial buildings with amendments, effective December 2016. The city also adopted ASHRAE 90.1-2013 with amendments, effective December 2016. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 53.7.

Residential

Houston adopted the 2015 IECC for residential buildings with amendments, effective October 2016. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 59.8.

Solar- and EV-ready

One of Houston’s amendment to the 2015 IRC includes a provision requiring new residential buildings to be solar-ready by installing a conduit. The city has not formally adopted an EV-ready mandate.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Indiana has established mandatory building energy codes for commercial and residential construction. The Indiana Energy Conservation Code, updated in 2011, references the 2009 IRC and 2009 IECC for residential construction. The commercial construction codes are as stringent as the ASHRAE 90.1-2007 standard. Commercial construction must also achieve LEED Silver certification. To learn more about the building energy codes for Indiana, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Indianapolis complies with the Indiana Energy Conservation Code. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 69.0. Indianapolis has not yet begun advocating to the state for increased stringency in commercial building energy codes.

Residential

Residential construction in Indianapolis complies with the Indiana Energy Conservation Code. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 68.5. Indianapolis has not yet begun advocating to the state for increased stringency in residential building energy codes. 

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not adopted a formal policy mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV- ready.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

State of Florida law requires that residential and commercial buildings comply with the 6th Edition Florida Building Code, Energy Conservation. The 6th Edition Florida Building Code, Energy Conservation is based on the 2015 IECC with amendments. The state bars cities from adoption codes more stringent than the state codes. To learn more about Florida’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Jacksonville complies with the Florida building energy codes. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 53.4. Jacksonville has not yet begun to advocate to the state level for increased stringency in commercial building codes.

Residential

Residential construction in Jacksonville complies with the Florida building energy codes. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 60.7. Jacksonville has not yet begun to advocate to the state level for increased stringency in residential building codes.

Solar- and EV-ready

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted solar- and/or EV-ready ordinances.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Missouri is home-ruled and allows local jurisdictions to set their own building codes. The State of Missouri has not adopted statewide building or energy codes. To learn more about Missouri’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Kansas City has the authority to set its own building codes. The city council adopted the 2012 IECC with amendments. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 50.1.

Residential

Kansas City has the authority to set its own building codes. The city council adopted the 2012 IECC with amendments. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 54.4.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city does not have a policy mandating new developments be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last updated: March 2019

The State of Tennessee is home-ruled and allows local jurisdictions to adopt their own building codes. To learn more about the building energy codes in Tennessee, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

The City of Knoxville has adopted the 2012 IECC for commercial construction.

Residential

The City of Knoxville has adopted the 2012 IECC for residential construction.

Last Updated: January 2017

Overview

As the state of Tennessee allows cities to adopt home-rule charters, the City of Knoxville holds jurisdiction over its city’s building energy code. The city adopted the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) by ordinance for both commercial and residential properties. To learn more about Tennessee’s building energy code requirements, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties must adhere to the 2012 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 59.2.

Residential

Residential properties must adhere to the 2012 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 70.5.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not adopted a formal policy mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV- ready.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Nevada is a home rule state and allows local governments to adopt building energy codes for their own jurisdiction. Effective July 2015, the State of Nevada adopted the 2012 IECC with state specific amendments for residential buildings and ASHRAE 90.1-2010 for commercial buildings.

Building professionals from Clark County participate the Southern Nevada Building Officials organization that promotes regional adoption of recommended building codes. [HB1] [AJ2] Since local jurisdictions are still responsible for adopting energy codes, the city adopted the 2018 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC).  

Commercial

Las Vegas adopted the 2018 International Building Code and 2018 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 45.3.

Residential

Las Vegas adopted the 2018 International Residential Code and 2018 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 52.8.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed a policy mandating new developments be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last updated: March 2019

The State of Kansas is a home-ruled state, and there are no statewide building energy codes. No jurisdiction is required to adopt building codes, but they may adopt the applicable 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) standards. To learn more about Kansas’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

The City of Lawrence has adopted the 2015 IECC with amendments for commercial construction, effective July 2016

Residential

The City of Lawrence has adopted the 2015 IECC with amendments for residential construction, effective July 2016

Last Updated: January 2017

Overview

The State of California requires all buildings to comply with statewide energy codes but allows local jurisdiction to adopt their own more stringent codes. The California Energy Commission is responsible for updating the state’s code.

Commercial

Commercial buildings in Long Beach must comply with CalGreen. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 49.1.

Residential

Residential buildings in Long Beach must comply with CalGreen. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 58.1.

Solar- and EV-ready

The California Energy Commission mandates that all new commercial and residential developments incorporate solar-ready infrastructure. The commission also adopted standards requiring solar systems on new home construction.  The city amended its code to include a provision requiring 25% of parking spaces be EV-ready and 5% to be currently EV-capable.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of California allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes that are more stringent than the mandatory state codes. Title 24 outlines all California building codes. Title 24, Part 6 includes the California Energy Code and the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards (BEES). Title 24, Part 11 includes the California Green Building Code. The  State of California updated the California Energy Code, BEES and California Green Building Codes in 2016 and are effective January 1, 2017. The 2016 codes exceed the 2015 IECC standards and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2013. To learn more about California’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Los Angeles adopted the 2016 BEES and the 2017 Los Angeles Green Building Code. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 51.7.

Residential

Los Angeles adopted the 2016 BEES and the 2017 Los Angeles Green Building Code. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 59.6.

Solar- and EV-ready

As required by state law, Los Angeles will require all new residential construction to include solar system installation beginning in 2020. The city’s Green Building Code mandates new residential dwelling and townhomes be EV-ready.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Kentucky requires its local jurisdictions to follow the 2018 Kentucky Building Code (KBC) and 2018 Kentucky Residential Code (KRC). The 2018 KBC references the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for commercial buildings and the 2015 IECC for residential buildings. To learn more about the required building codes for the State of Kentucky, please visit the State Policy Database

Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with the 2018 KBC. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 58.6.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the 2018 KRC. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 68.4.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last updated: March 2019

The State of Wisconsin requires local jurisdictions to follow the state building codes. Residential construction must follow the Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code, which references the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Commercial construction must follow the Wisconsin Commercial Building Code, which references the 2009 IECC. To learn more about Wisconsin’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Madison complies with the Wisconsin Commercial Building Code. The City of Madison advocates for more stringent energy codes. The City of Madison’s Building Inspection Unit has a representative that sits on the State Building Code and State Energy Code committees. The City also lobbies through Code Council groups to provide feedback on potential changes.

Residential

Residential construction in Madison complies with the Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code. The City of Madison advocates for more stringent energy codes. The City of Madison, Building Inspection Unit has a representative that sits on the State Building Code and State Energy Code committees. The City also lobbies through Code Council groups to provide feedback on potential changes.

Last Updated: January 2017

Overview

The State of Texas allows its local jurisdictions to adopt and amend the Texas Building Energy Code.  All residential and commercial building construction must comply with the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). To learn more about the Texas’s building energy code, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with the Texas Building Energy Code. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 53.7.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the Texas Building Energy Code. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 58.4.

Solar- and EV-ready

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted solar- and/or EV-ready ordinances.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Tennessee allows cities to adopt home rule charters by local referendum, as the City of Memphis did. Thus, the city adopts and enforces its own building energy codes. Memphis and Shelby County recently adopted the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) with local amendments. To learn more about Tennessee’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with 2015 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 59.2.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with 2015 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 70.5.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Arizona is a home rule state which allows local jurisdictions to set their own building energy codes. Most jurisdiction have adopted the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), but Mesa has only adopted the 2009 IECC with amendments. To learn more about the requirements for building energy codes for the State of Arizona, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with the 2009 IECC with local amendments. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 48.6.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the 2009 IECC with local amendments. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 59.6.

Solar- and EV-ready

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted solar- and/or EV-ready ordinances.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

State of Florida law requires that residential and commercial buildings comply with the 6th Edition Florida Building Code, Energy Conservation. The 6th Edition Florida Building Code, Energy Conservation is based on the 2015 IECC with amendments. The state bars cities from adoption codes more stringent than the state codes. To learn more about Florida’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Miami complies with the Florida building energy codes. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 53.4. Miami has not yet begun to advocate to the state level for increased stringency in commercial building codes.

Residential

Residential construction in Miami complies with the Florida building energy codes. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 60.7. Miami has not yet begun to advocate to the state level for increased stringency in residential building codes.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready; however, the city proposed establishing EV-ready requirements in residential and commercial buildings. 

Last updated: May 2019

Overview

The State of Wisconsin requires local jurisdictions to follow the state building codes. Residential construction must follow the Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code. The Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code incorporates the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Commercial construction must follow the Wisconsin Commercial Building Code, which is based on the 2009 IECC. To learn more about Wisconsin’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Milwaukee complies with the Wisconsin Commercial Building Code. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 53.8. The City of Milwaukee does not advocate for more stringent energy codes. 

Residential

Residential construction in Milwaukee complies with the Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 63.6. The City of Milwaukee does not advocate for more stringent energy codes. 

Solar- and EV-ready

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted solar- and/or EV-ready ordinances.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Minnesota currently requires local jurisdictions to comply with the 2015 Minnesota Energy Code. The state based the 2015 Minnesota Energy code on the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for both residential and commercial codes. Minneapolis does not have the authority to set its own building energy code, but actively advocates to the state for more stringent codes. To learn more about the Minnesota building energy code requirements, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with the 2015 Minnesota Energy Code. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 57.3.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the 2015 Minnesota Energy Code. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 51.9.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

Tennessee allows municipalities to adopt home-rule charters and thus adopt and enforce building energy codes at the jurisdictional level. Nashville has not adopted a home-rule charter, so the city enforces state building energy codes. Tennessee’s commercial energy code are equivalent to the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and the residential energy code is equivalent to the 2009 IECC. To learn more about the building energy codes in Tennessee, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with the 2012 IECC with amendments. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 59.2.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the 2009 IECC with amendments. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 70.5.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Connecticut requires residential and commercial buildings to comply with the Connecticut State Building Code which references the 2012 IECC. To learn more about the required building codes for the State of Connecticut, please visit the State Policy Database

Commercial

New Haven requires 2015 IECC for commercial buildings The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 55.0.

Residential

New Haven requires 2015 IECC for residential buildings. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 53.9.

Solar- and EV-ready

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted solar- and/or EV-ready ordinances.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Louisiana is a home rule state and allows local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes which are more stringent than the minimum state requirements, or to suit their local conditions. The minimum state standard requires residential buildings to comply with the 2009 IRC with reference to the 2009 IECC. Commercial buildings must comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2007.

Commercial

Despite having local authority, New Orleans has not adopted amendments or stretch codes regarding commercial buildings. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 70.3.

Residential

Despite having local authority, New Orleans has not adopted amendments or stretch codes regarding residential buildings. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 68.0.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of New York allows local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes that are more stringent than the minimum state standards. The 2016 Energy Conservation Construction Code of New York (2016 ECCCNYS) is the minimum mandatory code for residential and commercial buildings. ECCCNYS 2016 is as stringent as the 2015 IECC for residential buildings and ASHRAE 90.1-2013 for commercial buildings. New York City Local Law 32 compels the city to pass a stretch code in 2019 that is at least 20% more stringent than the state code. To learn more about the building energy codes required in the State of New York, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

New York City has adopted the 2016 New York City Energy Conservation Code (NYCECC). The city based the code on the 2016 New York State energy code with strengthening amendments. The 2016 NYCECC is more stringent than the ASHRAE 90.1-2013 and went into effect in October 2016. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 53.7. New York City advocates for more stringent building codes at the state level through the NYC Green Codes Task Force, which recommends specific amendments to the state code.

Residential

Residential construction must comply with the 2016 NYCECC, which is more stringent than the 2015 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 50.7. New York City advocates for more stringent building codes at the state level through the NYC Green Codes Task Force, which recommends specific amendments to the state code.

Solar- and EV-ready

Appendix RB of the 2016 NYCECC requires developers to install solar-ready infrastructure in one- and two-family homes. The city’s building code also requires parking garages install electric vehicle charging stations.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of New Jersey requires all commercial buildings to meet ASHRAE 90.1-2013 and all residential buildings to meet IECC 2015. To learn more about the building energy codes required in the State of New Jersey, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

New Jersey requires all commercial buildings to meet ASHRAE 90.1-2013. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 52.0.

Residential

New Jersey requires all residential buildings to meet IECC 2015. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 62.7.

Solar- and EV-ready

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted solar- and/or EV-ready ordinances.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of California allows local jurisdictions to adopt more stringent codes than the state. Oakland formally adopted the Green Building Ordinance that exceeds the statewide code.  To learn more about California’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial buildings adhere to the city’s Green Building Ordinance. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is score of 49.1.

Residential

Residential buildings adhere to the city’s Green Building Ordinance. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 58.1.

Solar- and EV-ready

California state code mandates new residential and commercial construction be solar-ready. Oakland adopted new codes requiring all new commercial construction be EV-ready and incorporate electric vehicle charging infrastructure.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Oklahoma allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes other than the state standards. Oklahoma adopted the 2015 International Residential Code (IRC) with amendments that require cities to comply with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Oklahoma adopted the 2015 International Building Code with amendments that require cities to comply with the 2006 IECC. To learn more, please visit the Oklahoma page on the State Policy Database

Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with the 2006 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 56.4.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the 2009 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 65.6.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Nebraska allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes other than the state standards. The state’s building energy code is the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. Omaha has not adopted an energy code more stringent than the state’s. To learn more, please visit the Nebraska page on the State Policy Database

Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with the 2009 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 67.0.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the 2009 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 68.4.

Solar- and EV-ready

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted solar- and/or EV-ready ordinances.

Last updated: March 2019

Overview

Effective 2017, Florida law requires that residential and commercial buildings comply with the 6th Edition Florida Building Code. The code is based on the 2017 International Energy Conservation Code with state amendments. Cities are not permitted to adopt codes more stringent than the state codes. To learn more about Florida’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database

Commercial

Commercial projects in Orlando comply with Florida’s building energy codes. Orlando has not yet begun to advocate to the state level for increased stringency in commercial building codes. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 53.4.

Residential

Residential projects in Orlando comply with Florida’s building energy codes. Orlando has not yet begun to advocate to the state level for increased stringency in residential building codes. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 60.7.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed a policy mandating new developments be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last updated: March 2019

Utah’s Uniform Building Code (UUBC) for residential and commercial building energy codes is mandatory statewide. The UUBC is based on the 2015 IECC with weakening amendments. While localities may adopt stretch codes, it is a difficult process to do so. To learn more about Utah’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database

Commercial

Park City adopted the UUBC. The city does not currently advocate for more stringent standards at the state level. 

Residential

Park City adopted the UUBC. The city does not currently advocate for more stringent standards at the state level. 

Last Updated: January 2017

Overview

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania requires its local jurisdictions to comply with state-mandated building energy codes. However, in 2018 the state granted Philadelphia a one-time opportunity to adopt its own building energy codes, and so the city adopted the 2018 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). To learn more about the required building energy codes for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with the 2018 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 46.4.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the 2018 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 52.7.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed a policy mandating new developments be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last Updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Arizona is a home rule state which allows local jurisdictions to set their own building energy codes. The City of Phoenix participated in the ICC voting process for the 2018 International Energy Conservation Code, and adopted the code in June 2018. The city also created the Phoenix Green Construction Code as an alternative compliance path. To learn more about the requirements for building energy codes for the State of Arizona, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with the 2018 IECC with city amendments or the Phoenix Green Construction Code. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 48.6.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the 2018 IECC for residential construction or the Phoenix Green Construction Code. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 59.6.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed a policy mandating new developments be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last Updated: March 2019

Overview

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania requires its local jurisdictions to comply with state-mandated building energy codes. Residential construction must comply with the 2009 IECC, although several residential provisions from the 2015 IECC were adopted by the state on January 1, 2016. Commercial construction must comply with the 2009 IECC and ASHRAE 90.1-2007. To learn more about the required building energy codes for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial projects comply with the state’s mandated codes. Pittsburgh created a working group with the assistance of the Green Building Alliance to improve city codes for Pittsburgh and work with partner cities to advocate for improved energy codes statewide. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 54.0.

Residential 

Residential projects comply with the state’s mandated codes. Pittsburgh created a working group with the assistance of the Green Building Alliance to improve city codes for Pittsburgh and work with partner cities to advocate for improved energy codes statewide.  The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 52.7

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed a policy mandating new developments be solar- and/or EV-ready. Pittsburgh created an EV Task Force consisting of representatives from city departments, Duquense Light Company, institutions, and community members. The Task Force is charged with developing policies and programs that will increase EV penetration, including EV-readiness in new buildings. 

Last Updated: May 2019

Overview

The State of Oregon requires its local jurisdictions to follow the 2014 Oregon Energy Efficiency Specialty Code for residential and commercial construction. The 2014 Oregon Energy Efficiency Specialty Code is more stringent than the 2009 IECC for residential buildings and is more stringent than the ASHRAE 90.1-2010 for commercial buildings. To learn more about the building energy codes for the State of Oregon, please visit the State Policy Database

Commercial

Commercial properties comply with the 2014 Oregon Energy Efficiency Specialty Code. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 59.9.

Residential

Residential properties comply with the 2014 Oregon Energy Efficiency Specialty Code.  The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 56.4.

Solar- and EV-ready

The Governor of the State of Oregon signed Executive Order NO. 17-20 in 2017 that directs the State Building Codes Division to amend the building code to require all newly constructed buildings in the state to include solar- and EV-ready infrastructure beginning on October 1, 2020 for residential projects and October 1, 2022 for commercial projects. 

Last Updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Rhode Island requires local jurisdictions to comply with the SBC-8 State Energy Conservation Code. The Conservation Code requires residential and commercial developments adhere to the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). In 2018, the state adopted a voluntary stretch code that individual projects and developments may adopt. The state bars cities from adopting the stretch code as its standard building code.

Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with the State Energy Conservation Code. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 60.0. The city does not advocate the state to adopt more stringent commercial energy codes.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the State Energy Conservation Code. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 65.2. The city does not advocate the state to adopt more stringent residential energy codes.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last Updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of North Carolina requires local jurisdictions to comply with the state mandated building energy codes. All buildings must comply with the 2018 North Carolina Energy Conservation Code, which is less stringent than the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and the ASHRAE 90.1-2007. To learn more about the building codes and requirements for the State of North Carolina, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Raleigh complies with the North Carolina Codes. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 63.6. Raleigh has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in commercial building energy codes.

Residential

Residential construction in Raleigh complies with the North Carolina Codes. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 64.6. Raleigh has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in residential building energy codes.

Solar- and EV-ready

North Carolina prohibits the city from passing an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last Updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Nevada allows local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes at the municipal level. Nevada has adopted the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) with state amendments for residential and commercial buildings. Reno has exceed the state code and adopted the 2018 IECC for residential and commercial buildings. To learn more about the building codes and requirements for the State of Nevada, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with the 2018 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 53.3.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the 2018 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 52.8.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last Update: March 2019

Overview

The Commonwealth of Virginia requires local jurisdictions to comply with the 2015 Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code (USBC). The state recently updated the code to reference the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and 2015 International Residential Code (IRC). To learn more, please see the Virginia page of the State Policy Database.  

Commercial

Commercial properties comply with the USBC. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 56.3. The city is a member of the Virginia Energy Efficiency Council (VAEEC) which advocates for higher energy standards.

Residential

Residential properties comply with the USBC. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 56.7. The city is a member of the Virginia Energy Efficiency Council (VAEEC) which advocates for higher energy standards.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last Updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of California allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes more stringent than the mandatory state codes. Title 24 outlines all California building codes. Title 24, Part 6 includes the California Energy Code and the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards (BEES). Title 24, Part 11 includes the California Green Building Code. The 2016 codes exceed the 2015 IECC standards and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2013. To learn more about California’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties comply with the 2016 California Building Standards Code. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 51.7.

Residential

Residential properties comply with the 2016 California Building Standards Code. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 59.6.

Solar- and EV-ready

Riverside adheres to the solar- and EV-ready requirements already included in the California Building Standards Code.

Last Update: March 2019

Overview

New York State allows local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes that are more stringent than the state code. New York requires residential buildings to comply with 2015 IECC and commercial buildings to comply with 2015 IECC or ASHRAE 90.1-2013. Rochester has not adopted a stretch code. To learn more about California’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with 2015 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 56.5.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the 2015 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 53.4.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last Update: March 2019

Overview

The State of California allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes more stringent than the mandatory state codes. Title 24 outlines all California building codes. Title 24, Part 6 includes the California Energy Code and the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards (BEES). Title 24, Part 11 includes the California Green Building Code. Sacramento has not adopted a stretch code and enforces state building energy codes. The 2016 codes exceed the 2015 IECC standards and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2013. To learn more about California’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with Title 24. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 51.7.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with Title 24. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 59.6.

Solar- and EV-ready

Sacramento adheres to the residential solar-ready requirements already included in the California Building Standards Code. The code also mandates EV-readiness in residential and nonresidential buildings.

Last Updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Minnesota currently requires local jurisdictions to comply with the 2015 Minnesota Energy Code. The state based the 2015 Minnesota Energy Code on the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for both residential and commercial codes. St. Paul does not have the authority to set its own building energy code, but actively advocates to the state for more stringent codes. Additionally, the state allows St. Paul to set stricter building standards if the development is receiving public funding. To learn more about the Minnesota building energy code requirements, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with the 2015 Minnesota Energy Code. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 57.3. St. Paul actively advocates to the state to adopt more stringent energy codes.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the 2015 Minnesota Energy Code The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 51.9. St. Paul actively advocates to the state to adopt more stringent energy codes.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last Update: March 2019

State of Florida law requires that residential and commercial buildings comply with the 6th Edition Florida Building Code, Energy Conservation. The 6th Edition Florida Building Code, Energy Conservation is based on the 2015 IECC with amendments. The state bars cities from adoption codes more stringent than the state codes. To learn more about Florida’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction must comply with the Florida Building Code. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 53.4.

Residential

Residential construction must comply with the Florida Building Code. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 60.7.

Solar- and EV-ready

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted solar- and/or EV-ready ordinances.

Last Update: March 2019

Overview

Utah’s Uniform Building Code (UUBC) for residential and commercial building energy codes is mandatory statewide. The UUBC is based on the 2015 IECC with weakening amendments. While localities may adopt stretch codes, it is a difficult process to do so. Salt Lake City participated in the ICC voting process for the 2018 IECC. To learn more about Utah’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database

Commercial

Commercial construction in Salt Lake City complies with the Utah Codes. Salt Lake City actively lobbies the state to increase the stringency of building energy codes. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code of 55.4. Most recently, the mayor advocated for more stringent codes in the 2014 State of the City Address.

Residential

Residential construction in Salt Lake City complies with the Utah Codes. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 65.5. Salt Lake City actively lobbies the state to increase the stringency of building energy codes. Most recently, the mayor advocated for more stringent codes in the 2014 State of the City Address.

Solar- and EV-ready

Chapter 21A.44 of the city code includes a provision requiring developers to install an electric vehicle charging station on one out of twenty-five parking spaces. The city has not adopted a solar-readiness ordinance.

Last Updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Texas allows its local jurisdictions to adopt and amend building energy codes that are at least as stringent as the Texas Building Energy Code. The minimum state standard for single-family residential construction must comply with the 2015 International Residential Code (IRC). All other residential and commercial building construction must comply with the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). San Antonio has adopted the 2018 IRC and 2018 IECC, effective October 2018. State-funded building construction must comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2013. To learn more about the building energy code requirements for the State of Texas, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties in San Antonio must comply with the 2015 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 47.2.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the 2018 IRC and IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 58.4.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last Updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of California allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes more stringent than the mandatory state codes. Title 24 outlines all California building codes. Title 24, Part 6 includes the California Energy Code and the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards (BEES). Title 24, Part 11 includes the California Green Building Code. The 2016 codes exceed the 2015 IECC standards and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2013. To learn more about California’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties comply with the 2016 California Building Standards Code. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 51.7.

Residential

Residential properties comply with the 2016 California Building Standards Code. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 59.6.

Solar- and EV-ready

San Diego adheres to the solar- and EV-ready requirements already included in the California Building Standards Code.

Last Updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of California allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes that are more stringent than the mandatory state codes. Title 24 outlines all California building codes. Title 24, Part 6 includes the California Energy Code and the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards (BEES). Title 24, Part 11 includes the California Green Building Code. The 2016 codes exceed the 2015 IECC and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2013. To learn more about California’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

San Francisco amended the California Green Building Code to create the more stringent San Francisco Green Building Code for commercial buildings. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 49.1.

Residential

San Francisco amended the California Green Building Code to create the more stringent San Francisco Green Building Code for residential buildings. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 58.1.

Solar- and EV-ready

Per San Francisco city code, new developments must not only install solar-ready infrastructure but also incorporate a solar PV system, solar hot water heater, or livable roof on the building. San Francisco also requires developers install EV-ready infrastructure into 20% of parking spaces.

Last Updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of California allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes that are more stringent than the mandatory state codes. Title 24 outlines all California building codes. Title 24, Part 6 includes the California Energy Code and the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards (BEES). Title 24, Part 11 includes the California Green Building Code. The 2016 codes exceed the 2015 IECC standards and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2013. To learn more about California’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties comply with the 2016 California Building Standards Code. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 51.7.

Residential

Residential properties comply with the 2016 California Building Standards Code. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 59.6.

Solar- and EV-ready

San Jose adheres to the solar- and EV-ready requirements already included in the California Building Standards Code.

Last Updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Washington requires all local jurisdictions to comply with the state mandated residential building energy codes but permits local jurisdictions to have more stringent commercial codes. The 2015 Washington State Energy Code is a state-developed code that is mandatory statewide. As of July 1, 2016, the 2015 versions of the residential and commercial codes include standards more stringent than the 2015 IECC and ASHRAE 90.1-2013. To learn more about the building energy codes required in the State of Washington, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties comply with the Washington State Energy Code. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 51.9.

Residential 

Residential properties comply with the Washington State Energy Code. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 55.1. 

Solar- and EV-ready

The city requires commercial and multifamily buildings to install renewable energy or be solar-ready. As part of this policy, if solar is not feasible, the building must achieve energy efficiency savings more stringent than the current code. The city has not passed an EV-ready ordinance.

Last Updated: March 2019

Overview

The State of Missouri allows local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes more stringent than the state’s code. In 2018, St. Louis adopted the 2018 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) by ordinance, along with several other of the 2018 ICC codes.  To learn more about Missouri’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with the 2018 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 51.9.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the 2018 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 55.1.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last Updated: March 2019

Overview

State of Florida law requires that residential and commercial buildings comply with the 6th Edition Florida Building Code, Energy Conservation. The 6th Edition Florida Building Code, Energy Conservation is based on the 2015 IECC with amendments. The state bars cities from adoption codes more stringent than the state codes. To learn more about Florida’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Tampa complies with the Florida codes. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 53.4. Tampa has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in commercial building energy codes.

Residential

Residential construction in Tampa complies with the Florida codes. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 60.7. Tampa has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in residential building energy codes.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last Update: March 2019

Overview

The State of Arizona is a home rule state which allows local jurisdictions to set their own building energy codes. Tucson adopted the 2018 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) with amendments. To learn more about the requirements for building energy codes for the State of Arizona, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial projects must comply with the 2018 IECC with city amendments. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 48.6

Residential

Residential projects must comply with the 2018 IECC with city amendments. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 59.6.

Solar- and EV-ready

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted solar- and/or EV-ready ordinances.

Last Update: March 2019

The State of Oklahoma allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes other than the state standards. Oklahoma adopted the 2015 International Residential Code (IRC) with amendments that require cities to comply with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Oklahoma adopted the 2015 International Building Code with amendments that require cities to comply with the 2006 IECC. To learn more, please visit the Oklahoma page on the State Policy Database

Commercial

Commercial properties must comply with the 2006 IECC. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 74.5.

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the 2015 IRC. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 65.6.

Solar- and EV-ready

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted solar- and/or EV-ready ordinances.

Last Update: March 2019

Overview

The State of Virginia requires its local jurisdictions to follow the 2012 Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code (USBC) for residential and commercial construction. The USBC references the 2012 IECC and 2012 IRC. To learn more, please see the Virginia page of the State Policy Database.  

Commercial

Commercial buildings must meet 2012 IECC standards with reference to ASHRAE 90.1-2010. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 56.3. The city is a member of the Virginia Energy Efficiency Council (VAEEC) and advocates for higher energy standards through the organization.

Residential

Residential buildings must comply with the 2012 IRC. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 56.7. The city is a member of the Virginia Energy Efficiency Council (VAEEC) and advocates for higher energy standards through the organization.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last Updated: March 2019

Overview

Washington, D.C.’s energy codes are mandatory across the District. Residential and commercial construction must comply with the 2013 D.C. Construction Code. The D.C. Construction Code includes the Energy Conservation Code which is more stringent than the 2012 IECC and ASHRAE 90.1-2010. The Construction Code also includes the Green Construction Code which is based on the 2012 International Green Construction Code. The city's 2017 DC Construction Code update is out for public review and includes an alternative compliance pathway for net-zero energy buildings called Appendix Z. To learn more about the District of Columbia’s required energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial properties comply with the 2013 D.C. Construction Code. Projects over 10,000 square feet must comply with the Green Construction Code. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 63.9.

Residential

Residential buildings comply with the 2013 D.C. Construction Code. Projects over 10,000 square feet must comply with the Green Construction Code. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 62.1.

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed a policy mandating new developments be solar- and/or EV-ready. However, the 2017 DC Construction Code is currently available for public review and includes solar-ready requirements for new commercial developments and major alterations or additions. 

Last Updated: May 2019

Overview 

The State of Massachusetts requires all buildings to be consistent with 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC)/ASHRAE 90.1-2013, but grants municipalities the authority to adopt a state-determined stretch code. Worcester adopted this stretch code in 2010.  To learn more about Massachusetts’s required energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial 

Commercial properties must comply with the 2015 IECC/ASHRAE 90.1-2013. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 49.8. 

Residential

Residential properties must comply with the 2015 IECC/ASHRAE 90.1-2013. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 48.9

Solar- and EV-ready

The city has not passed an ordinance mandating new construction be solar- and/or EV-ready.

Last Updated: March 2019