State and Local Policy Database

Renewable Energy Efforts

Cities and utilities also have the opportunity to increase their clean energy production through solar and wind sources. Utilities can invest in their own renewable energy production and provide incentives to encourage customers to install distributed solar or wind systems. Cities can address their own consumption by participating in utility renewable energy programs, typically through a surcharge or some other payment that reflects the consumption of the alternative clean energy. Cities can also use their participation in a program to encourage their local utility to increase utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation.

This sub-category includes information on two topics: renewable energy incentives offered by electric utilities for the installation of distributed renewable generation systems; and efforts of the local government to decarbonize the electric grid. For munis, this second metric measures the percentage of total utility generation from renewable sources; for IOUs, the metric measures city actions to encourage more renewable generation from their IOU.

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, FirstEnergy did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm whether or not the city of Akron participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, PNM did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The city of Albuquerque supports legislation and regulatory efforts to allow for more renewable energy in the state, such as community solar and renewable portfolio standard legislation. The City has participated in the New Mexico Public Regulatory Commission hearings on the Solar Direct program. The Solar Direct program was initiated by requests from Mayor Tim Keller for PNM to provide more large-scale opportunities for the City to rely on renewable energy. Under the direction of Mayor Keller, the City worked with PNM over several months to develop a scope and contract for purchasing 25 MW from the Solar Direct voluntary solar program.  Mayor Keller has since announced and championed the City's role as a major customer (50% of the total project output of 50 MW) of the program.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, PPL Electric Utilities did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm whether or not the city of Allentown participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Georgia Power did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems. Georgia Power does offer other solar programs, which allow customers to purchase solar power with long-term fixed price contracts, purchase solar RECs to match up to 100% of energy use, and a community solar program.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City of Atlanta’s Chief Resilience Officer—in lieu of testifying during the 2019 Integrated Resource Planning hearings—sent a letter to the Public Service Commission supporting the increase in the amount of utility-scale solar included in Georgia Power's Integrated Resource Plan. The City of Atlanta's Clean Energy Plan to transition both municipal operations and the entire city to clean energy by 2035 requires utility action. The City worked collaboratively with Georgia Power to finalize the plan.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Georgia Power did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems. Georgia Power does offer other solar programs, which allow customers to purchase solar power with long-term fixed price contracts, purchase solar RECs to match up to 100% of energy use, and a community solar program.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm whether or not the city of Augusta participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Xcel Energy provided $460,801 in incentives for the installation of 21,753 kW of new distributed solar systems. This equates to $21/kW installed. These incentives were installed through Xcel’s Solar*Rewards program, which offers incentives for residential and commercial solar installations. The program is broken into a Small and Medium-sized offering, with $0.005/kWh provided for installations of 0.05 kW–25 kW and $0.0425/kWh for installations between 25.01 kW–500 kW. In 2018, the small program installed 8,218 kW and the medium program installed 13,535 kW.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm whether or not the city of Aurora participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Austin Energy provided $5,500,557 in incentives on installed distributed generation capacity totaling 7,937 kW and equating to $693/kW. Austin Energy’s Solar Photovoltaic Rebate program provides up to $2,500 for customers who complete a solar education course and install a qualifying solar photovoltaic system on their home. The solar education course covers topics such as sizing your system, solar access and equipment, rebates and financing, and comparison of proposals.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, Austin Energy produced 43% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, PG&E provided $16,817,792 in incentives for the installation of 14,610 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $1,151/kW installed. PG&E offered multiple incentive programs in 2018, including Multifamily Affordable Solar Housing (MASH), Single Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH), New Solar Homes Partnership (NSHP), Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP), and California Solar Initiative Thermal (CSI-Thermal). Through the CSI-Thermal program, PG&E provided $4,968,801 in incentives for the energy savings of 223,460 therms, equating to $22.24/therm.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm if city of Bakersfield participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, BG&E did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City of Baltimore supported efforts by advocates and submitted testimony to support increasing the state of Maryland's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS). After two years of efforts, the state approved an increased RPS to 50% of the total grid by 2030 and requires the state to examine pathways for achieving 100% clean power by 2040.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Entergy Louisiana did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm whether or not the city of Baton Rouge participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Alabama Power did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm whether or not the city of Birmingham participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Idaho Power did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City of Boise participates with the Idaho Power Integrated Resource Planning Process as a member of the IRP Advisory Committee to encourage IRP support and implementation for energy future goals. The City has also participated in relevant cases with the Idaho Public Utilities Commission related to net metering for on-site solar installations. Boise’s Energy Future Plan also calls on the utility to ramp up renewable energy resources.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Eversource did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems. The Solar Massachusetts Renewable Target (SMART) Program was implemented in 2019, which provides incentives for the development of PV projects up to 5 MW in size. 

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

Through Boston’s Municipal Aggregation, the city aims to spur the development of more local solar generating facilities and community share solar under the Massachusetts Solar Massachusetts Renewable Target (SMART) program. Boston is still in the process of selecting a vendor and negotiating a contract, but this bid event specifically asks for proposals on how to achieve “additionality” through the construction of new renewable generating facilities. In addition, the Renew Boston partnership includes efforts to increase renewable energy adoption in Boston.

The City has also submitted comments in Public Utility Commission proceedings and Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources rulemakings related to renewable energy on several occasions, including on the Massachusetts Clean Peak Standard, SMART program, and the Single Parcel Rule. In addition, the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center is partnering with the City of Boston to install a solar and energy storage system at the Boston Fire Department training facility on Moon Island.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

United Illuminating did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems in 2018.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, the City of Bridgeport partnered with United Illuminating to install an 8,550-panel solar array on the City’s capped landfill, which produces enough energy to supply 400 homes per year. To the best of our knowledge, the City of Bridgeport does not have a formal partnership with United Illuminating to promote renewable generation nor has actively advocated to the public utility commission on renewable energy issues.

Last Updated: February 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, National Grid did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2017, the City of Buffalo registered comments with the New York Public Service Commission (PSC) requesting that the utility spur distributed and renewable generation. The comments were submitted on August 8, 2017, during the most recent National Grid New York PSC rate case (Case # 17-E-0238). The City encouraged the PSC to evaluate how the tariff can support and encourage local, distributed generation, such as minimizing interconnection barriers, high costs for standby power, and rate penalties as generators reduce their energy demand.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Lee County Electric Coop did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

We were unable to determine the percentage of generation from renewable resources for Lee County Electric Coop in 2018.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Dominion Energy South Carolina did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm whether or not the city of Charleston participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Duke Energy Progress launched its NC Solar Rebate Program solar, with projects installed in 2019. The program will provide $0.50 per watt incentives for nonresidential installations, $0.60 per watt incentives for residential solar installations, and $0.75 per watt for non-profit customers. Total incentives spent and kW renewables installed in 2018 was not available.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

On January 16, 2019, the City of Charlotte and Duke Energy Carolinas signed a "Memorandum of Understanding between the City of Charlotte and Duke Energy Carolinas to Establish a Low Carbon, Smart City Collaboration," a non-binding agreement of cooperation and collaboration. The Memorandum outlines various overarching values, goals, and shared principles to foster a low carbon, smart city collaboration and provides a strategy for cooperation and achievement of a shared vision through broad collaboration, focusing on innovation, low carbon energy, economic development opportunities, customer choice programs and technology. 

In addition, the City of Charlotte has been involved in Public Utility Commission proceedings regarding renewable energy developments. The Charlotte City Council passed the City's participation in Duke Energy's Green Source Advantage program, which will provide utility-scale, 35 MW solar energy system to help the city get 25% closer to its zero carbon buildings by 2030 goal. Based on the success of Charlotte's Green Source Advantage project, the City is partnering with Duke Energy to educate other North Carolina municipalities on how to replicate Charlotte's process to pursue their own utility-scale renewable energy efforts.

The City is also preparing comments on Duke Energy's 2020 Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) and plans to participate in stakeholder meetings leading up to the September 2020 IRP filing. The City is particularly interested in expanding utility-scale renewable generation due to limited opportunities to source zero-carbon energy in the state. 

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

ComEd offered renewable generation incentives through its Distributed Generation Rebate (“DG Rebate”) program for commercial and industrial customers that receive net metering service or to community supply project owners or their subscribers. Qualified applicants are eligible for a $250/kW rebate for up to 2,000 kW of installed generation. In 2018, ComEd provided $8,015,000 in incentives on installed distributed generation capacity totaling 32,060 kW.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

Mayor Lori Lightfoot endorsed the proposed Illinois Clean Energy Jobs Act, which would continue to strengthen renewable energy goals statewide, calling on the governor and state legislature to pass this bill. Chicago has been a key partner in ComEd's Community of the Future program, targeting the Bronzeville area of Chicago. The project includes a microgrid, and several pilots and programs to create a smarter and more connected community. As part of the microgrid, the City, the Chicago Housing Authority, and ComEd partnered to add 700 kW of solar panels on a public housing facility called Dearborn Homes.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, SDG&E provided $957,927 in incentives for the installation of 319 kW of new distributed solar systems to 102 single-family homes, equating to $3,000/kW installed. These incentives were paid for the Single-family Affordable Solar Homes (SASH) program. The SASH program provides one up-front capacity-based incentive of $3 per watt to qualified low-income homeowners for the installation of solar systems. SDG&E launched the Solar on Multifamily Affordable Housing (SOMAH) program in early 2019, which will offer between $0.60 to $3.20 per watt. SOMAH is a statewide program that aims to install 30 MW of generating capacity by 2030, making solar accessible to low-income ratepayers in the state.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City's Climate Action Plan (CAP) set a goal of 100% renewable energy by 2035. To meet this goal, the City partnered with other local jurisdictions—including San Diego, Encinitas, La Mesa, and Imperial Beach—to form a Community Choice Aggregate with the goal of providing 100% renewable energy by 2035.  The city plans to file an implementation plan to the California Public Utility Commission before 2020 with the goal of serving power to ratepayers by 2021. San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E) will work together with this joint-powers authority (JPA) Community Choice Energy Authority by providing billing, customer service and transmission of power. 

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Duke Energy Ohio did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2011, voters approved a ballot initiative to launch Community Choice Aggregation in the City of Cincinnati. In 2016, Cincinnati residents saved $1.5 million on electricity and $2 million on gas costs through the Cincinnati’s Aggregation Program. The electric aggregation program provides 100% green energy by purchasing renewable energy credits to offset consumption. In 2017, the City added an opt-in option for green natural gas option. 

The city of Cincinnati engages with the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio on relevant energy rate cases that involve renewable energy developments. The City was active in the opposition to House Bill 6 which provided bailouts to coal-fired and nuclear facilities in the state of Ohio. The City also signed a 35 MW Power Purchase Agreement to serve the City government, and an additional 65 MW is under negotiation to serve the residents and small businesses through the Community Choice Aggregation Program.

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, CEI did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City has sent letters to legislators and the Public Utility Commission of Ohio related to keeping the State's renewable and efficiency standards, as well as support for Project Icebreaker, the first offshore freshwater wind project in North America. In 2013, 2015, and 2018, the city of Cleveland incorporated renewable energy into electric aggregations for CEI customers, helping to spur renewable energy investments on the CEI electric grid.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

CSU offers incentives for the installation of solar PV generation systems at homes and businesses through their Renewable Energy Program. Business and residential customers are eligible for a $0.20 per watt rebate and up to 40% of the total system may be covered by rebates and tax credits. In 2018, CSU provided $886,089 in incentives for the installation of 4,400 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $201/kW installed.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, Colorado Springs produced 9.8% of its generation from renewable resources.

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Dominion Energy South Carolina did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm whether or not the city of Columbia participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, AEP Ohio did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2019, the City conducted a study to determine capacity for renewable energy generation in the city. Columbus is working with AEP Ohio to develop a microgrid demonstration project on one of its Recreation and Parks facilities to test the technology and create a critical community resource center to serve as a resilience hub in the event of a natural disaster. As part of the Smart Columbus, initiative the City of Columbus has supported AEP Ohio's proposal to install 900 MW of renewable energy in Ohio to decarbonize the grid. 

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Oncor offered the Solar Photovoltaic Program, which is available to both commercial and residential customers that meet program eligibility criteria. We were unable to determine the total spending and kW installed through the program in 2018.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

As part of the 2019 Green Energy Policy, the City has taken steps to become involved in the related regulatory proceedings. The Green Energy Policy established a relationship with the City’s energy provider to work toward expanding renewable green energy that requires the city to use 100% renewable energy and directs actions towards implementing on and off-site generation. The City is also developing its Comprehensive Environmental & Climate Action Plan, which will also create opportunities to spur more utility-scale renewable generation to serve the city.

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Dayton Power & Light did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm whether or not the city of Dayton participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Xcel Energy provided $460,081 in incentives for the installation of 21,754 kW of new distributed solar systems. This equates to $21/kW installed. These incentives were installed through Xcel’s Solar*Rewards program, which offers incentives for residential and commercial solar installations. The program is broken into a Small and Medium-sized offering, with $0.005/kWh provided for installations of 0.05 kW–25 kW and $0.0425/kWh for installations between 25.01 kW–500 kW. In 2018, the small program installed 8,218 kW and the medium program installed 13,535 kW.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City of Denver actively participate in regulatory proceedings to advocate for a rapid and equitable decarbonization of Xcel Energy’s Colorado grid and to expand and increase access to voluntary renewable electricity programs. Denver is a currently an intervenor and active participant in several PUC proceedings that could significantly impact ratepayers in Denver and the ability for Denver to achieve our clean electricity targets.

Denver is also launching an initiative to leverage municipal space to provide geographically and socio-economically diverse locations at which to locate community solar gardens, energy storage systems, and electric vehicle charging infrastructure. The Colorado Department of Local Affairs (DOLA) has invited Denver to submit a full application to the Renewable and Clean Energy Challenge grant program. Denver is requesting up to $5 million dollars to support implementation of the initiative. The initiative supports 1) renewable energy generation; 2) resilience; 3) energy burden relief and cost savings; 4) zero emissions vehicles; 5) community-engagement; and 6) education. It is intended create a blueprint, founded on community-engagement and equity considerations, for other Colorado communities to follow.

In January 2018, the city and county of Denver and Xcel Energy signed an innovative and progressive partnership agreement called the Energy Futures Collaboration. This partnership lays out an expedited pathway for Denver to pursue independent clean energy projects that help the city meet its energy and climate goals in partnership with Xcel Energy. In addition, Xcel Energy’s recent announcement of a carbon neutral electricity goal system-wide by 2050 cited commitments and pressure from cities like Denver who have set aggressive renewable electricity goals.

The strategic efforts related to achieving 100% renewable electricity, community wide are to: 1) increase voluntary RE participation; 2) decarbonize the grid mix; and 3) develop local community-based renewable energy projects. Denver and Xcel Energy are working to finalize our 2020 Workplan (to be released in December 2019), which will include the development of municipally-hosted community solar gardens as a priority implementation project.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, MidAmerican Energy did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm whether or not the city of Des Moines participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, DTE did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

To our knowledge, the city of Detroit does not participate in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, EPE did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The city of El Paso facilitates a Regional Renewable Energy Advisory Council, which advocates for the use and development of renewable energy in El Paso with members from all city districts. To our knowledge, the city of El Paso does not participate in other activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility. The city is currently developing an Energy Plan which will address renewable generation. The city also participates in the Regional Renewable Energy Advisory.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Oncor offered the Solar Photovoltaic Program, which is available to both commercial and residential customers that meet program eligibility criteria. We were unable to determine the total spending and kW installed through the program in 2018.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The city of Fort Worth participates on the Steering Committee of Cities Served by Oncor, where they represent consumer interests and advocate on behalf of electricity consumers to the Public Utility Commission and elsewhere on issues related to renewable energy. The city is also advocates for renewable generation through its membership in the Texas Coalition of Cities for Utility Issues, which is a coalition of more than 50 Texas municipalities dedicated to protecting and supporting the interests of citizens and cities in regards to utility issues.

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, PG&E provided $16,817,792 in incentives for the installation of 14,610 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $1,151/kW installed. PG&E offered multiple incentive programs in 2018, including Multifamily Affordable Solar Housing (MASH), Single Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH), New Solar Homes Partnership (NSHP), Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP), and California Solar Initiative Thermal (CSI-Thermal). Through the CSI-Thermal program, PG&E provided $4,968,801 in incentives for the energy savings of 223,460 therms, equating to $22.24/therm.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City of Fresno is considering allowing Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) options for its residents.  The Council has to first complete a technical study to determine the costs and benefits of a CCA. 

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Consumers Energy did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City of Grand Rapid’s has provided public comments to the Michigan Public Service Commission (PSC) advocating for increased energy efficiency and renewable energy. The city is also working with Consumers Energy on strategies to accomplish the city’s renewable energy goals as well as increase renewable energy generation within the city. Both the electric and natural gas utility sit in on the city’s Energy Advisory Committee, which is charged with challenging the city to stay at the forefront of energy work. They also work collaboratively on reducing the city’s municipal energy use and developing programs for low-income residents.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Duke Energy Carolinas did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm whether or not the city of Greensboro participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Eversource did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The Mayor’s Office of Sustainability testified before the state legislature’s Energy and Technology Committee in favor of SB 336, which advocated for the adoption of a shared and community solar program. Community solar incentivizes the creation of additional solar capacity focus on low-income subscribers. The city also advocated for the preservation of net metering during the same testimony. In addition, the City’s Energy Improvement District Board issued a Comprehensive Plan in February 2018, which identified neighborhoods and facilities for potential solar installations. This report focused on community solar as a tool for expanding renewable energy access to our residents, who are primarily low-income. The City of Hartford’s Office of Sustainability also staffs the Energy Improvement District Board, which supports the addition of renewable energy capacity throughout Hartford. In addition, the City of Hartford's Energy Improvement District is in a unique position to distribute electricity. As a result, the EID Board recently issued an RFP and selected a contract to establish a shared clean energy facility. Reference:

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, NV Energy did provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar and wind systems. NV Energy’s Solar Incentives program provides $0.45 per watt for low-income and nonprofit installations and $0.20 per watt for residential, commercial, and industrial installations. In 2018, NV Energy spent $10,157,246 to install 41,769 kW of renewable resources, which equates to $21/kW installed.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

To our knowledge, the city of Henderson does not participate in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Hawai'i Energy did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City and County of Honolulu plays an active role in encouraging more utility-scale and distributed energy generation. For example, in 2018, the City and County intervened in the PUC Docket 2018-0088, advocating for renewable portfolio standards amongst other priority outcomes from reforming Hawai’i Energy’s incentive structure. The City is also in the process of developing two new energy service performance contracts to expand energy efficiency and renewable energy deployment across city facilities and parks.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, CenterPoint Energy did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City of Houston launched its first power purchase agreement in 2017. The goal of the Green Power Program is to show that a city Houston’s size can reach 100% green power. The City of Houston recently announced a proposed solar farm development on the former 300-acre Sunnyside landfill. To our knowledge, the city of Houston does not participate in any additional activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, IPL did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The Thrive Indianapolis partnership between the City and energy utilities includes a focus on energy. The plan aims to promote the use of renewable energy to improve air quality and reduce greenhouse gas emissions and also install microgrids to provide local backup generation in the case of emergencies. IPL partners with the City of Indianapolis on this effort, which sets renewable energy goals that require action from IPL. The City of Indianapolis is also actively involved in IPL’s Integrated Resource Plan Development.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, JEA did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, JEA produced about 1% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

Evergy’s Solar Power Rebate program provides $0.50 per watt to qualified residential and commercial customers. In 2018, we were unable to determine the total spending and kW installed through the program.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

Kansas City typically intervenes in pending renewable energy cases, while not often providing written comments. While not a specific formal partnership, the City most recently passed Resolution 181000 regarding the City’s goal of procuring 100% carbon-free electricity. The city is working to facilitate and achieve parts of the resolution with renewable energy efforts.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, neither KUB nor TVA did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, TVA produced 12% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Lakeland Electric did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, we were unable to determine the percentage of Lakeland Electric’s generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

NV Energy’s Solar Incentives program provides $0.45 per watt for low-income and nonprofit installations and $0.20 per watt for residential, commercial, and industrial installations. In 2018, NV Energy provided $10,157,246 in incentives for the installation of 41,769 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $243/kW installed.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City of Las Vegas actively lobbies in favor of utility scale and distributed generation, greater Renewable Portfolio Standards, and net metering at the Nevada Public Utilities Commission and Nevada State Legislature.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Entergy Arkansas did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm whether or not the city of Little Rock participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, SCE provided $41,726,058 in incentives for the installation of 395,000 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $106/kW installed. Incentive levels ranges from 2.2 cents per kWh to 8.8 cents per kWh depending on the customer classification.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City of Long Beach is currently considering the formation of a Community Choice Aggregation program. At this time, we cannot confirm if Long Beach participates in other activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, LADWP provided $16,323,021 in incentives for the installation of 35,300 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $462/kW installed. The LADWP Solar Incentive Program (SIP) offered incentives to offset the cost of installing a rooftop solar system on homes and businesses. Incentives were based on customer type, with residential customer receiving $0.25 per watt, commercial customers receiving $0.30 per watt, and government, nonprofit, and affordable housing customers receiving $0.95 per watt. As of March 2019, LADWP has a total of 297 MW of Net Energy Metered solar projects with $330 million in solar incentives provided since the inception of SIP. While the SIP officially closed at the end of 2018, but the program still has a long waitlist of projects that are being addressed through available funds.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, according to LADWP, they produced 32% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, LG&E did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The Louisville Metro Office of Advanced Planning and Sustainability is currently in discussions with LG&E on options to finance the development of a solar field through their Solar Share Program. The Louisville Metro Council is considering a resolution to support 100% clean renewable energy goals for the Metro Government operations by 2030, and a 100% clean energy goal for the community by 2040.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, MGE, through the Focus on Energy program, provided $212,969 in incentives for the installation of 470 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $453/kW installed.

Focus on Energy offers two separate programs for renewable energy projects. The first is the Prescriptive Renewable Energy Program for eligible residential and small business customers. Incentives for solar electric PV are 12% of installed cost not to exceed $2,000 for residential, and 12% of installed cost not to exceed $4,000 for small business. The incentive for geothermal heat pump systems is $650 both residential and small business customers.

The second program is the Renewable Energy Competitive Incentive Program (RECIP), which is available for business customers.  Incentives are awarded through a competitive proposal process and based on the estimated first year net energy production (or offset) of the system. Applicants must propose a $/kWh and/or $/therm amount, up to $0.50/kWh and $1.00/therm. The maximum combined incentives from the program (including both energy efficiency and renewable energy) is capped per calendar year at $400,000.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The Madison City Mayor often speakers out in support of the city’s renewable energy goals. The Mayor and City Clerk executed an agreement with Madison Gas & Electric for a 5 Megawatt Renewable Energy Rider Project.

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, AEP Texas offered renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems. We were unable to verify the total incentives spent and total installed capacity through incentives in 2018. The SMART Source Solar PV Program offers financial incentives to offset the cost of initial installation of a solar system for residential and business customers. In 2019, the program offered $0.60 per watt for residential customers. For commercial customers, they offer $0.70 per wat for 0–25 kW systems and $0.25 per watt for 25–200 kW systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

To our knowledge, the city of McAllen does not participate in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, neither MLGW nor TVA provided renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, TVA produced 12% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, SRP did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, SRP produced 6.4% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, FPL did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City of Miami is on the waiting list for FPL's Solar Together program, which allows the City to invest in FPL's utility-scale solar energy. 

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, We Energies, through the Focus on Energy program, provided $1,203,455 in incentives for the installation of 4,598 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $262/kW installed.

Focus on Energy offers two separate programs for renewable energy projects. The first is the Prescriptive Renewable Energy Program for eligible residential and small business customers.  Incentives for solar electric PV are 12% of installed cost not to exceed $2,000 for residential, and 12% of installed cost not to exceed $4,000 for small business. The incentive for geothermal heat pump systems is $650 both residential and small business customers.

The second program is the Renewable Energy Competitive Incentive Program (RECIP), which is available for business customers.  Incentives are awarded through a competitive proposal process and based on the estimated first year net energy production (or offset) of the system. Applicants must propose a $/kWh and/or $/therm amount, up to $0.50/kWh and $1.00/therm. The maximum combined incentives from the program (including both energy efficiency and renewable energy) is capped per calendar year at $400,000.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City of Milwaukee advocated to the PSC in favor of solar tariffs and distributed solar generation. In 2018, city officials published a letter to We Energies urging the utility to create large scale renewable energy options. After working with the City, We Energies created two new renewable energy tariffs: Solar Now and the Dedicated Renewable Energy Resource (DRER).

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Xcel Energy provided $19,284,836 in incentives for the installation of 7,600 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $2,537/kW installed. Xcel Energy provides incentives for the installation of distributed solar under 40 kW through its Solar*Rewards Community program. Production incentives are based on segment (residential, low-income, and commercial) beginning at $0.06 per kWh. In addition, income-qualified projects include an up-front incentive beginning at $1 per watt.

In addition, Xcel Energy also has a community solar program (Solar*Rewards Community) this is not an incentive program but does offer bill credits for customers who work with a third-party developer as part of a community solar garden installation. These bill credits vary by year and time period.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City is actively involved in almost a dozen dockets before the Public Utility Commission. The City Council has authorized the formal intervention of the City of Minneapolis, through the Sustainability Division staff, as a party of the Xcel Energy 2020-2034 Integrated Resource Plan Docket before the Minnesota PUC. The City has also established the Minneapolis Clean Energy Partnership with the utilities, which has a 2019 to 2021 Work Plan including numerous renewable energy goals and activities.

In addition, City staff have directly engaged with Xcel Energy in their Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) planning process by advocating for increases in renewable electricity generation at the utility-scale, community-scale, and building-scale. Xcel Energy hosted a series of in-depth stakeholder meetings/workshops in advance of releasing their preferred IRP plan, and City staff actively participated in all of these meetings. The City is also classified as an intervenor in the IRP and thus a party to any settlements or agreements. This allows City staff to formally advocate and negotiate for the maximum level of renewable electricity production to meet the City's climate and renewable electricity goals. 

 Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable energy incentives

In 2017, PEPCO did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems. 

City-led efforts to decarbonize the grid

Montgomery County is working with PEPCO to develop a public service microgrid. The county’s Climate Mobilization Report notes the expansion of Renewable Portfolio Standards advocacy as potential next steps and outlines a plan for achieving renewable energy goals with utilities.

Last updated: December 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, neither NES nor TVA did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, TVA produced 12% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, United Illuminating did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The Board of Alders City Services and the Environmental Policy Committee recently voted unanimously in support of a proposed resolution that would have the city formally call on the state legislature and the governor to pass enabling legislation to allow for Community Choice Aggregation to be created in Connecticut.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Entergy New Orleans did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, Entergy New Orleans produced 0% of its total generation from renewable sources.

As of April 15, 2020, the City Council confirmed its commitment to 100% Renewable and Clean Portfolio Standard by 2040. At the end of 2019, Entergy New Orleans had 6 MW of solar installed in Orleans parish and the Council has approved an additional 90 MW, which will be in service in 2021. While the rest of the state has removed full retail net metering for new customers, New Orleans is committed to maintaining this policy. 

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, ConEd did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

New York City participates in utility rate cases and PSC proceedings related to renewable energy, such as on the value of distributed energy resources, community shared solar, and micro grid tariffs and regulation. New York City also engages with NYSERDA on the structure and implementation of renewable energy programs and advocates for transmission of large-scale renewables directly into the City’s electric utility territory. The City is also currently conducting a study with the local utilities to understand the pathway forward for carbon neutrality.

New York City has also been involved in capacity valuation proceedings at the NYISO and pushing for fair treatment of energy storage resources. In its Roadmap to 80 x 50, New York City also states that they "will continue to look to Con Edison as a partner in achieving 80 x 50, and will also continue to advocate for utilities to build upon these improvements and accelerate the transformation necessary for a 2050 grid that is renewables-based, affordable, and reliable."

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, PSE&G did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm if city of Newark participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, PG&E provided $16,817,792 in incentives for the installation of 14,610 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $1,151/kW installed. PG&E offered multiple incentive programs in 2018, including Multifamily Affordable Solar Housing (MASH), Single-Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH), New Solar Homes Partnership (NSHP), Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP), and California Solar Initiative Thermal (CSI-Thermal). Through the CSI-Thermal program, PG&E provided $4,968,801 in incentives for the energy savings of 223,460 therms, equating to $22.24/therm.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City of Oakland is a founding member of East Bay Community Energy (EBCE), a local government Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) with strong targets for local renewable energy systems. Renewable energy requirements are found in the Joint Powers Agreement for the agency. EBCE has a Local Business Development Plan, which sets their goals for local distributed renewable energy generation, and describes their desires for greater customer access to utility and meter data. The Oakland Clean Energy Initiative is an effort to provide more local clean energy in Alameda County by replacing an aging electricity generator in Oakland's Jack London Square area with a new clean energy source. This effort is in partnership with PG&E and East Bay Community Energy (EBCE).

In addition, the City has signed on to group letters of support to the CPUC for various renewable energy policies relating to program design or tariffs, attended hearings and provided testimony on energy efficiency and renewable energy rate cases, and pushed for policies related to renewable energy developments. For example, the mayor sent a letter to the CPUC to reject a proposal that would raise fees for people switching from their electricity provider to a city-run CCA program.

Oakland’s City Council has set ambitious climate targets that require electrifying the building stock as rapidly as possible. As an important first step, the City is exploring electrification-based building reach codes to include in its 2019 code updates. On June 13, 2019, Oakland and Berkeley convened a workshop with local market-rate and affordable multifamily housing developers and electrification experts to discuss the feasibility and benefits of building electrification and get feedback on how to craft electrification policies that do not inhibit development of housing.

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, OG&E did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City Council’s legislative agenda for 2020 does include support for efforts to allow net metering for utility customers to receive credits for solar and wind systems.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Omaha Public Power District did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, OPPD produced 33% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, OUC provided $126,012 in incentives for the installation of 4,274 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $29/kW installed.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, OUC produced 3% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, SCE provided $41,726,058 in incentives for the installation of 395,000 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $106/kW installed. Incentive levels ranges from 2.2 cents per kWh to 8.8 cents per kWh depending on the customer classification.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City of Oxnard has a Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) through the Clean Power Alliance, which is a locally controlled electricity provider in Southern California. Clean Power Alliance offers three power mix choices, including a lean option that's 36% renewable, clean option that's 50% renewable, and 100% green power option. According to their 2018–2019 Impact Report, 28% of Clean Power Alliance customers were on the 100% green power option 52% on clean power, and 19% on lean power. 

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, PECO did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The city’s Powering Our Future report outlines advocacy opportunities for the City and others around increasing clean energy generation in our regional electricity grid. In addition, the City of Philadelphia is moving forward with a large-scale power purchase agreement that will result in the largest solar generation facility in Pennsylvania. The City and PGW are currently partnering on a utility business diversification study, including opportunities to add renewable energy generation to PGW’s suite of services.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, APS did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City of Phoenix has been participating the Arizona Corporation Commission to advocate for decarbonizing the local electric grid, and also joined the board of the Arizona Independent Schedulers Association (AZISA), which is registered as an intervenor in the ACC hearings.  They have been advocating for an increased RPS standard for Arizona utilities beyond the current 15% standard. The City recently entered into an agreement with SRP to supply 15% of City Energy Use as solar energy as part of the utilities goal to add 1000MW of new solar to its portfolio. The City was a key stakeholder in a utility goal setting process that inspired the utility to set renewable energy goals of 62% carbon reduction by 2035 and a 90% reduction by 2050.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Duquesne Light did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm if city of Pittsburgh participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Energy Trust of Oregon provided $4,363,915 in incentives for the installation of 10,187 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $428/kW installed. Energy Trust offers a Solar for your Home and for your Business program. In 2018, the residential incentive for Portland General Electric residential customers was up to $0.35 per watt (up to $2,800) and commercial customers can receive $0.45 – $0.20 per watt for projects up to 400 kW (up to $35,000).

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

Through the City of Portland's Clean Energy program, the City partners with PGE, NW Natural, and Energy Trust of Oregon (among others) to promote energy efficiency and renewable power production through a variety of residential, commercial, and other government initiatives. The city maintains a Solar Map which indicates the location of distributed generation solar resources in the City. City staff regularly participate in state and PUC legislative rulemaking proceedings, and the City has been an advocate for PGE’s efforts to provide a clean tariff for large commercial and institutional customers. The City has also partnered with NW Natural on a renewable natural gas development project involving the use of excess biogas at the City’s wastewater treatment plant and turning it into RNG for transportation fuel.

Last Updated: February 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Narragansett Electric did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The city of Providence actively engages with the state to support key policies related to energy efficiency and renewable energy. For example, the City submitted written testimony in support of House bill 5536, which removes unnecessary barriers to allow municipalities to choose the electricity supplier for its residents and businesses to enable community choice aggregation. The City also supported legislation that would expand net metering options to nonprofits, including hospitals and universities.

In 2019, the Providence City Council voted to authorize the Mayor and the City’s Office of Sustainability to develop and implement an aggregation plan to allow the residents of Providence to have more control over their electric bills. Under Rhode Island state law, CCA programs provide the opportunity to bring the benefits of competitive choice of electric supplier, longer-term price stability and more renewable energy options to the residents and businesses of the City of Providence and other municipalities in Rhode Island. The City Council is in full support of this program and the potential monetary and environmental benefits to our community. The City solicited bids in late 2019 and in early 2020 awarded a contract for a consultant to assist the City in the creation and operation of an aggregation plan and CCA program.

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Provo City Power did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, according to the Environmental Protection Agency’s Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGrid), Provo City Power produced 0% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Duke Energy Progress launched its NC Solar Rebate Program solar, with projects installed in 2019. The program will provide $0.50 per watt incentives for nonresidential installations, $0.60 per watt incentives for residential solar installations, and $0.75 per watt for non-profit customers. Total incentives spent and kW solar systems installed in 2018 was not available.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

To our knowledge, the city of Raleigh does not participate in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

NV Energy’s Solar Incentives program provides $0.45 per watt for low-income and nonprofit installations and $0.20 per watt for residential, commercial, and industrial installations. In 2018, NV Energy provided $10,157,246 in incentives for the installation of 41,769 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $243/kW installed.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City of Reno provides regular updates to the City Council on renewable energy legislation and also hired a local attorney to monitor the Nevada Public Utility Commission.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Dominion Energy offered the Solar Purchase Program, which is a pilot program that helps cover the cost of adding solar generation to properties. Participating customers install and own the solar generation system but sell the electricity and solar Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) back to Dominion Energy at a premium rate of 15 cents per kW/hour. The program did not provide direct incentives for installing the renewable system. Total incentives spent and kW solar installed in 2018 were not available.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

Through RVAgreen 2050, the City has started discussions with Dominion Energy regarding the City’s GHG emission reduction goals and opportunities for partnerships or strategies in the areas of energy efficiency and renewable energy. Richmond’s Sustainability Manager is a co-chair of the VA Energy & Sustainability Network (VESPN), a peer network of local government energy & sustainability managers from across Virginia working to advance clean energy and sustainability. VESPN is actively pursuing a number of strategies including net-metering legislation; collaborative purchasing of renewables; and utility partnerships.

The Virginia Clean Economy Act replaces the voluntary renewable energy portfolio system with a mandatory renewable energy portfolio system (RPS). Under the mandatory RPS, utilities and suppliers are required to produce their electricity from 100% renewable sources by 2045 for Dominion Energy Virginia and any supplier operating in the service territory of Dominion Energy Virginia, which includes energy supplied to Richmond.

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

To our knowledge, RPU did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, RPU produced 31% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, RG&E did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In November 2019, the Mayor of Rochester submitted legislation to the City Council to authorize a community choice aggregation (CCA) program for the community. The City authorized the legislation and is currently pursuing next steps. The CCA will allow the City to select clean, renewable source of energy and would maintain the current utility to distribute the electricity to city customers. The utility will distribute energy while City purchases 100% renewable, clean energy from supplier of choice.

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, SMUD did not offer rebates for solar installations. SMUD’s solar program does provide stipend amounts designed to offset the purchase and installation costs for the meter and cabinet equipment, including $300 per installation (effective June 1, 2018).

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, SMUD produced 31% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Xcel Energy provided $19,284,836 in incentives for the installation of 7,600 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $2,537/kW installed. Xcel Energy provides incentives for the installation of distributed solar under 40 kW through its Solar*Rewards Community program. Production incentives are based on segment (residential, low-income, and commercial) beginning at $0.06 per kWh. In addition, income-qualified projects include an up-front incentive beginning at $1 per watt.

In addition, Xcel Energy also has a community solar program (Solar*Rewards Community) this is not an incentive program but does offer bill credits for customers who work with a third-party developer as part of a community solar garden installation. These bill credits vary by year and time period.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In December 2019, the City Council passed a resolution opposing the inclusion of a new natural gas plant in Xcel Energy’s Integrated Resource Plan (IRP), urging Xcel and the Public Utility Commission (PUC) to instead find ways to further accelerate utility-scale renewables and storage. The resolution directed staff to comment on Xcel’s IRP filing at the PUC. That filing is currently being revised, and after it is complete, the City will be sending official comments consistent with the Council resolution.

The City’s newly adopted Climate Action and Resilience Plan (December 2019) also calls for increasing distributed single-family residential solar on rooftops from the current 7.1 MW citywide to 50 MW by 2030 and 70 MW by 2050, as well as commercial and multi-family targets of 100 MW by 2030 and 160 MW by 2050. The City has also signed a letter of interest with Xcel to purchase 5 MW of renewable through the next round of Xcel’s Renewable Connect program.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Rocky Mountain Power did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

Salt Lake City was an official signatory on the Net Metering settlement with the Public Service Commission. Salt Lake City is formally collaborating with electric utility through the existing Statement of Cooperation and joint plans to deliver 100% renewable electricity to all customers within city limits by 2032. The city collaborated with other Utah communities and the utility to develop the Community Renewable Energy Act (HB411), which authorizes Rocky Mountain Power to provide 100% renewable electricity to Salt Lake City and participating communities by 2030. The Act was passed in the Utah legislature in 2019.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, CPS Energy provided $17,863,179 in incentives for the installation of 33,686 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $530/kW installed. CPS Energy offers rebates for both residential and commercial solar systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, CPS Energy produced 24% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, SDG&E provided $957,927 in incentives for the installation of 319 kW of new distributed solar systems to 102 single-family homes, equating to $3,000/kW installed. These incentives were paid for the Single-family Affordable Solar Homes (SASH) program. The SASH program provides one up-front capacity-based incentive of $3 per watt to qualified low-income homeowners for the installation of solar systems. SDG&E launched the Solar on Multifamily Affordable Housing (SOMAH) program in early 2019, which will offer between $0.60 to $3.20 per watt. SOMAH is a statewide program that aims to install 30 MW of generating capacity by 2030, making solar accessible to low-income ratepayers in the state.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The city of San Diego is engaged in various regulatory proceedings at the California Public Utility Commission. The City advocates on behalf of the City and/or the community to encourage more renewable generation adoption. The City advocated in the Net Energy Metering proceeding for grandfathering of older net metering rates that the City used to calculate its cost-benefit analysis. The City also participated the regulatory process involving exit fees, which are fees charged to customers who buy electricity from government-run community choice programs rather than traditional utilities.

San Diego is the largest city in America to pursue a Clean Energy Community Choice (CCA) program. Plans are currently in place to establish a regional joint powers agreement that will include Chula Vista, La Mesa, Encinitas and Imperial Beach. The five-city regional JPA would be the second largest CCA in California, behind only the Clean Power Alliance in the Los Angeles area. San Diego is also working with SDG&E for renewable energy interconnection. SDG&E has agreed to put excess generation on the grid and receive credit through RES-BCT tariff. To meet the City’s 2015 Climate Action Plan’s goal of 100% renewable by 2035, City has implemented several privatized solar installations interconnected with utility grid where the City buys solar energy at a fixed bundled price which includes the Renewable Energy Certificates.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, PG&E provided $16,817,792 in incentives for the installation of 14,610 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $1,151/kW installed. PG&E offered multiple incentive programs in 2018, including Multifamily Affordable Solar Housing (MASH), Single Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH), New Solar Homes Partnership (NSHP), Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP), and California Solar Initiative Thermal (CSI-Thermal). Through the CSI-Thermal program, PG&E provided $4,968,801 in incentives for the energy savings of 223,460 therms, equating to $22.24/therm.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

CleanPowerSF is the City’s Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) program, which began delivering cleaner energy to San Francisco neighborhoods in May 2016. CleanPowerSF enrolled San Francisco customers in phases, with a target of enrolling 100% of eligible accounts by July 2019. In April 2019, CleanPowerSF completed its last major enrollment of customer accounts. Currently, over 376,000 customers are enrolled in CleanPowerSF. CleanPowerSF has a target of retaining 95% of its active services and have five percent of eligible accounts enrolled in SuperGreen. CleanPowerSF has set a target for the default Green service to achieve the California Energy Commission’s requirement that all electricity retailers provide 33% of power from eligible renewable resources by 2020. CleanPowerSF is above that target, as the Green service is currently 48% renewable energy. Additionally, the City of San Francisco’s target of a 50% renewable electricity supply by the end of 2020 was met 3 years early, in 2017. San Francisco has submitted a bid to purchase PG&E’s electricity distribution assets serving San Francisco and associated transmission infrastructure. 

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, PG&E provided $16,817,792 in incentives for the installation of 14,610 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $1,151/kW installed. PG&E offered multiple incentive programs in 2018, including Multifamily Affordable Solar Housing (MASH), Single Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH), New Solar Homes Partnership (NSHP), Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP), and California Solar Initiative Thermal (CSI-Thermal). Through the CSI-Thermal program, PG&E provided $4,968,801 in incentives for the energy savings of 223,460 therms, equating to $22.24/therm.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

San José Clean Energy (SJCE) supplies power to the majority of San José residents and businesses, nearly 330,000 customers (less than 1.5% of customers opted to remain with PG&E). The 2019 power mix for SJCE’s default service, GreenSource, supplies customers with 45% renewable and 80% carbon-free electricity. Customers can also upgrade to TotalGreen to power their home or business with 100% renewable and carbon-free energy. As of October 2019, about 1,100 customers are signed up for TotalGreen. SJCE intends to enter into power purchase agreements with developers of wind and solar plants who will build new plants to fulfill the agreements with SJCE and plans to offer 100% GHG-free power as a base product no later than 2021.

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Seattle City Light did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, Seattle City Light produced 94% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Eversource did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems. The Solar Massachusetts Renewable Target (SMART) Program was implemented in 2019, which provides incentives for the development of PV projects up to 5 MW in size. 

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm whether or not the city of Springfield participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, MO SB 564 approved Ameren to spend up to $10 million in 2019 on solar rebates. Ameren MO began taking applications in 2018 and offered rebates of $0.50/watt in the first half of 2019 and $0.25/watt in the second half of 2019.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2020, the City of St. Louis signed on to Ameren's green tariff program to procure renewable energy. Ameren is adapting the program now, and the city plans to revisit the program offering in June 2020.

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Duke Energy Florida did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

St. Petersburg's Clean Energy Roadmap emphasizes Duke Energy Florida's needed role in transitioning towards renewable energy resources, including state and utility-specific recommendations to help them transition to clean energy production.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, PG&E provided $16,817,792 in incentives for the installation of 14,610 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $1,151/kW installed. PG&E offered multiple incentive programs in 2018, including Multifamily Affordable Solar Housing (MASH), Single-Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH), New Solar Homes Partnership (NSHP), Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP), and California Solar Initiative Thermal (CSI-Thermal). Through the CSI-Thermal program, PG&E provided $4,968,801 in incentives for the energy savings of 223,460 therms, equating to $22.24/therm.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In March 2019, the City of Stockton voted to pursue a technical study for a Community Choice Energy program for its community.

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, National Grid did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm whether or not the city of Syracuse participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, TECO did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm if city of Tampa participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, FirstEnergy did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

Toledo is part of the Northwest Ohio Aggregation Coalition (“NOAC”), which formed a Community Choice Aggregation Program. The Coalition consists of 13 member communities which includes three opt-out governmental aggregation programs, 1) a residential electric program, 2) a small commercial electric program, and 3) a natural gas program for both residential and small commercial. Since its inception the participants in the NOAC communities have realized nearly $76 million in savings.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, TEP did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm if city of Tucson participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, PSO did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm if city of Tulsa participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Dominion Energy offered the Solar Purchase Program, which is a pilot program that helps cover the cost of adding solar generation to properties. Participating customers install and own the solar generation system but sell the electricity and solar Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) back to Dominion Energy at a premium rate of 15 cents per kW/hour. The program did not provide direct incentives for installing the renewable system. Total incentives spent and kW solar installed in 2018 were not available.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm if the city of Virginia participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

The Virginia Clean Economy Act replaces the voluntary renewable energy portfolio system with a mandatory renewable energy portfolio system (RPS). Under the mandatory RPS, utilities and suppliers are required to produce their electricity from 100% renewable sources by 2045 for Dominion Energy Virginia and any supplier operating in the service territory of Dominion Energy Virginia, which includes energy supplied to Virginia Beach.

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, DCSEU provided $320,591 in incentives for the installation of 1,836 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $175/kW installed. DCSEU offered incentives to both market-rate and low-income buildings, with higher incentives for low-income buildings.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, Pepco produced 6% of its total generation from renewable sources.

The City has submitted comments in public utility commission proceedings regarding renewable energy advocacy, such as net metering legislation. The DC Department of Energy and the Environment (DOEE) has participated in the RM-9 Working Group that addresses issues of interconnection timelines, specifically for community solar, net-metering, and other issues. DOEE has been an active participant int eh PSC's Formal Case 1050, regarding interconnection, and has recently submitted comments about a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking that impacts community solar interconnection. The City has also been directly involved in utility planning efforts around expanding utility-scale renewable generation. DOEE participated in the PSC's Formal Case 1017 in a working group to weigh in on the development of a PPA for a portion of the electric utility's Standard Offer Service procurement. 

Last Updated: May 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Evergy did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm whether or not the city of Wichita participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, Duke Energy Progress launched its NC Solar Rebate Program solar, with projects installed in 2019. The program will provide $0.50 per watt incentives for nonresidential installations, $0.60 per watt incentives for residential solar installations, and $0.75 per watt for non-profit customers. Total incentives spent and kW renewables installed in 2018 was not available.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm whether or not the city of Winston-Salem participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2020

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2018, National Grid did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems. The Solar Massachusetts Renewable Target (SMART) Program was implemented in 2019, which provides incentives for the development of PV projects up to 5 MW in size. 

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In March 2020, the City Worcester was the first in the state to launch a Community Choice Aggregation program for all city residents. The program at least doubles the renewable energy for all participants by purchasing 20% more renewable energy and includes a 100% green energy option. The goal of the program is to provide the city with flexible options to procure renewable energy, ensure price stability for residents, provide consumer protection and informed electrify choice to residents, with universal, equitable access and treatment for all. 

Last Updated: May 2020