State and Local Policy Database

Renewable Energy Efforts

Cities and utilities also have the opportunity to increase their clean energy production through solar and wind sources. Utilities can invest in their own renewable energy production and provide incentives to encourage customers to install distributed solar or wind systems. Cities can address their own consumption by participating in utility renewable energy programs, typically through a surcharge or some other payment that reflects the consumption of the alternative clean energy. Cities can also use their participation in a program to encourage their local utility to increase utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation.

This sub-category includes information on two topics: renewable energy incentives offered by electric utilities for the installation of distributed renewable generation systems; and efforts of the local government to decarbonize the electric grid. For munis, this second metric measures the percentage of total utility generation from renewable sources; for IOUs, the metric measures city actions to encourage more renewable generation from their IOU.

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, PNM did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The city of Albuquerque supports legislation and regulatory efforts to allow for more renewable energy in the state, such as community solar and renewable portfolio standard legislation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Georgia Power did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems. Georgia Power does offer other solar program, which allow customers to purchase solar power with long-term fixed price contracts, purchase solar RECs to match up to 100% of energy use, and a community solar program. 

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm whether or not the city of Atlanta participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Xcel Energy provided $442,925 in incentives for the installation of 20,700 kW of new distributed solar systems. This equates to $21/kW installed. These incentives were installed through Xcel’s Solar*Rewards program, which offers incentives for residential and commercial solar installations. The program is broken into a Small and Medium-sized offering, with $0.005/kWh provided for installations of 0.05 kW–25 kW and $0.0475/kWh for installations between 25.01 kW–500 kW. In 2017, the small program installed 14,560 kW and the medium program installed 6,140 kW.

Last Updated: March 2019

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm whether or not the city of Aurora participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Austin Energy provided $6,230,084 in incentives for the installation of 6,580 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $947/kW installed. Austin Energy’s Solar Photovoltaic Rebate program provides up to $2,500 for customers who complete a solar education course and install a qualifying solar photovoltaic system on their home. The solar education course covers topics such as sizing your system, solar access and equipment, rebates and financing, and comparison of proposals.

Last Updated: March 2019

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2017, Austin Energy produced 36% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, PG&E provided $14,998,004 in incentives for the installation of 14,238 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $1,039/kW installed. PG&E offered four different solar incentive programs in 2017, including Multifamily Affordable Solar Housing (MASH), Single Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH), New Solar Homes Partnership (NSHP), Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP).

The MASH program is currently closed to new applicants and has been replaced by the Solar on Multifamily Affordable Housing (SOMAH). SOMAH is a statewide program that aims to install 30 MW of generating capacity by 2030, making solar accessible to low-income ratepayers in the state. The SASH program provides one up-front capacity-based incentive of $3 per watt to qualified low-income homeowners for the installation of solar systems. NSHP provided incentives to encourage home builders to construct new, energy efficient solar homes. NSHP is no longer accepting applications, as the program has ended per Senate Bill 83. SGIP provides financial incentives for business and residential customers installing new, qualifying equipment for generating and storing energy, applying to both renewable and non-renewable technologies.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm if city of Bakersfield participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, BG&E did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City of Baltimore supported efforts by advocates and submitted testimony to support increasing the state of Maryland's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS). After two years of efforts, the state approved an increased RPS to 50% of the total grid by 2030 and requires the state to examine pathways for achieving 100% clean power by 2040.

Last Updated: April 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Alabama Power did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm whether or not the city of Birmingham participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Eversource did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

Through Boston’s Municipal Aggregation, the city aims to spur the development of more local solar generating facilities and community share solar under the Massachusetts Solar Massachusetts Renewable Target (SMART) program. Boston is still in the process of selecting a vendor and negotiating a contract, but this bid event specifically asks for proposals on how to achieve “additionality” through the construction of new renewable generating facilities. In addition, the Renew Boston partnership includes efforts to increase renewable energy adoption in Boston.

The City has also submitted comments in Public Utiltiy Commission proceedings and Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources rulemakings related to renewable energy on several occasions, including on the Massachusetts Clean Peak Standard, SMART program, and the Single Parcel Rule. In addition, the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center is partnering with the City of Boston to install a solar and energy storage system at the Boston Fire Department training facility on Moon Island.

Last Updated: April 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, United Illuminating did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2017, the City of Bridgeport partnered with United Illuminating to install an 8,550-panel solar array on the City’s capped landfill, which produces enough energy to supply 400 homes per year. To the best of our knowledge, the City of Bridgeport does not have a formal partnership with United Illuminating to promote renewable generation nor has actively advocated to the public utility commission on renewable energy issues.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, National Grid did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2017, the City of Buffalo registered comments with the New York Public Service Commission (PSC) requesting that the utility spur distributed and renewable generation.  The comments were submitted on August 8, 2017 during the most recent National Grid New York PSC rate case (Case # 17-E-0238). The City encouraged the PSC to evaluate how the tariff can support and encourage local, distributed generation, such as minimizing interconnection barriers, high costs for standby power, and rate penalties as generators reduce their energy demand.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Duke Energy Carolinas did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems. In 2018, Duke Energy Progress launched its NC Solar Rebate Program solar, with projects installed in 2019. The program will provide $0.50 per watt incentives for nonresidential installations, $0.60 per watt incentives for residential solar installations, and $0.75 per watt for non-profit customers.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

On January 16, 2019, the City of Charlotte and Duke Energy Carolinas signed a "Memorandum of Understanding between the City of Charlotte and Duke Energy Carolinas to Establish a Low Carbon, Smart City Collaboration," a non-binding agreement of cooperation and collaboration. The Memorandum outlines various overarching values, goals, and shared principles to foster a low carbon, smart city collaboration and provides a strategy for cooperation and achievement of a shared vision through broad collaboration, focusing on innovation, low carbon energy, economic development opportunities, customer choice programs and technology. 

Last Updated: April 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, ComEd did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems. ComEd will begin offering renewable generation incentives in December 2018. The Distributed Generation Rebate (“DG Rebate”) program is available to commercial and industrial customers that receive net metering service or to community supply project owners or their subscribers. Qualified applicants are eligible for a $250/kW rebate for up to 2,000 kW of installed generation.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

To our knowledge, the city of Chicago does not participate in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, SDG&E provided $655,500 in incentives for the installation of 218.5 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $3,000/kW installed. These incentives were paid for the Single-family Affordable Solar Homes (SASH) program. The SASH program provides one up-front capacity-based incentive of $3 per watt to qualified low-income homeowners for the installation of solar systems. SDG&E plans to launch the Solar on Multifamily Affordable Housing (SOMAH) program is set to in early 2019, which will offer between $0.60 to $3.20 per watt. SOMAH is a statewide program that aims to install 30 MW of generating capacity by 2030, making solar accessible to low-income ratepayers in the state.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The city of Chula Vista’s Climate Action Plan (CAP) sets a goal of 50% renewable energy production by SDG&E for the city by 2030. According to the Plan, SDG&E had a renewable energy rate of 43% in late 2016 and has contracts to extend renewable generation to 49% by 2021. The city’s CAP Implementation Plan includes strategies to encourage more renewable generation from SDG&E.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Duke Energy Ohio did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The city of Cincinnati engages with the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio on relevant energy rate cases that involve renewable energy developments.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, CEI did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2013, 2015, and 2018, the city of Cleveland incorporated renewable energy into electric aggregations for CEI customers, helping to spur renewable energy investments on the CEI electric grid.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, AEP Ohio did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2017, the Mayor announced the City’s goals to explore a 100% renewable energy portfolio for municipal operations by 2030.  By 2023, the City will purchase 50% of its energy from renewable energy resources. In 2019, the City will conduct a study to procure on-site renewable energy generation. Beyond these upcoming efforts, the city of Columbus does not participate in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Oncor provided $4,557,017 in incentives for the installation of 3,342 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $1,364/kW installed. These incentives were offered through Oncor’s Solar Photovoltaic Program, which is available to both commercial and residential customers that meet program eligibility criteria.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

To our knowledge, the city of Dallas does not participate in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Xcel Energy provided $442,925 in incentives for the installation of 20,700 kW of new distributed solar systems. This equates to $21/kW installed. These incentives were installed through Xcel’s Solar*Rewards program, which offers incentives for residential and commercial solar installations. The program is broken into a Small and Medium-sized offering, with $0.005/kWh provided for installations of 0.05 kW–25 kW and $0.0475/kWh for installations between 25.01 kW–500 kW. In 2017, the small program installed 14,560 kW and the medium program installed 6,140 kW.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

Denver has played an active role on many fronts to pursue additional renewables at the utility and local scale. In 2016, the city and county of Denver contributed to multiple Public Utility Commission rate cases, which will allow customers of Xcel Energy more control over their energy choices, bring more renewables and carbon-free energy to Colorado and Denver, and provide affordable and reliable energy to the state’s economy. In January 2018, the city and county of Denver and Xcel Energy signed an innovative and progressive partnership agreement called the Energy Futures Collaboration. This partnership lays out an expedited pathway for Denver to pursue independent clean energy projects that help the city meet its energy and climate goals in partnership with Xcel Energy. In addition, Xcel Energy’s recent announcement of a carbon neutral electricity goal system-wide by 2050 cited commitments and pressure from cities like Denver who have set aggressive renewable electricity goals.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, DTE did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

Detroit is in the final stages of constructing the O'Shea Solar Park project, which is a partnership with the local utility, DTE Energy, to install 2 megawatts of solar on 10 acres of underutilized parkland while rehabilitating the adjacent, formerly decommissioned park and managing stormwater through a large on-site bioswale. To our knowledge, the city of Detroit does not participate in any additional activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, EPE did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The city of El Paso facilitates a Regional Renewable Energy Advisory Council, which advocates for the use and development of renewable energy in El Paso with members from all city districts. To our knowledge, the city of El Paso does not participate in other activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility. The city is currently developing an Energy Plan which will address renewable generation. The city also participates in the Regional Renewable Energy Advisory

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Oncor provided $4,557,017 in incentives for the installation of 3,342 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $1,364/kW installed. These incentives were offered through Oncor’s Solar Photovoltaic Program, which is available to both commercial and residential customers that meet program eligibility criteria.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The city of Fort Worth participates on the Steering Committee of Cities Served by Oncor, where they represent consumer interests and advocate on behalf of electricity consumers to the Public Utility Commission and elsewhere on issues related to renewable energy.  The city is also advocates for renewable generation through its membership in the Texas Coalition of Cities for Utility Issues, which is a coalition of more than 50 Texas municipalities dedicated to protecting and supporting the interests of citizens and cities in regards to utility issues.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Consumers Energy did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City of Grand Rapid’s has provided public comments to the Michigan Public Service Commission (PSC) advocating for increased energy efficiency and renewable energy. The city is also working with Consumers Energy on strategies to accomplish the city’s renewable energy goals as well as increase renewable energy generation within the city.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Eversource did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The Mayor’s Office of Sustainability testified before the state legislature’s Energy and Technology Committee in favor of SB 336, which advocated for the adoption of a shared and community solar program. Community solar incentivizes the creation of additional solar capacity focus on low-income subscribers. For this model, the utilities would likely administer the program. The city also advocated for the preservation of net metering during the same testimony. In addition, the City’s Energy Improvement District Board issued a Comprehensive Plan in February 2018, which identified neighborhoods and facilities for potential solar installations. This report focused on community solar as a tool for expanding renewable energy access to our residents, who are primarily low-income 

Last Updated: April 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, NV Energy did provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar and wind systems. We were unable to verify data on the total spending and installed capacity from these programs in 2017. NV Energy’s Solar Incentives program provides $0.45 per watt for low-income and nonprofit installations and $0.20 per watt for residential, commercial, and industrial installations.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

To our knowledge, the city of Henderson does not participate in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Hawai’i Energy did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The city and county of Honolulu plays an active role in encouraging more utility-scale and distributed energy generation. For example, in 2018, the city and county intervened in the PUC Docket 2018-0088, advocating for renewable portfolio standards amongst other priority outcomes from reforming Hawai’i Energy’s incentive structure.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, CenterPoint Energy did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

To our knowledge, the city of Houston does not participate in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, IPL did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The Thrive Indianapolis partnership between the City and energy utilities includes a focus on energy. The plan aims to promote the use of renewable energy to improve air quality and reduce greenhouse gas emissions and also install microgrids to provide local backup generation in the case of emergencies. IPL partners with the City of Indianapolis on this effort. 

Last Updated: April 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, JEA did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2017, JEA produced 0% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, KCP&L provided $637,245 in incentives for the installation of 1,448 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $440/kW installed. KCP&L’s Solar Power Rebate program provides $0.50 per watt to qualified residential and commercial customers. 

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

To our knowledge, Kansas City does not participate in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, KUB did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, TVA produced 13% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, NV Energy did provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar and wind systems. We were unable to verify data on the total spending and installed capacity from these programs in 2017. NV Energy’s Solar Incentives program provides $0.45 per watt for low-income and nonprofit installations and $0.20 per watt for residential, commercial, and industrial installations.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

To our knowledge, the city of Las Vegas does not participate in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, SCE provided $59,706,029 in incentives for the installation of 363,370 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $164/kW installed. SCE’s renewable incentives ended in 2016, with incentives paid out through 2017 for installed solar or wind projects.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

To our knowledge, the city of Long Beach does not participate in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, LADWP provided $14,504,862 in incentives for the installation of 34,080 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $426/kW installed. The LADWP Solar Incentive Program (SIP) offered incentives to offset the cost of installing a rooftop solar system on homes and businesses. Incentives were based on customer type, with residential customer receiving $0.25 per watt, commercial customers receiving $0.30 per watt, and government, nonprofit, and affordable housing customers receiving $0.95 per watt. As of March 2019, LADWP has a total of 297 MW of Net Energy Metered solar projects with $330 million in solar incentives provided since the inception of SIP. While the SIP oficially closed at the end of 2018, but the program still has a long waitlist of projects that are being addressed through available funds.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2017, LADWP produced 30% of its generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: April 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, LG&E did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

To our knowledge, the city of Louisville does not participate in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, AEP Texas offered renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems. We were unable to verify the total incentives spent and total installed capacity through incentives in 2017. The SMART Source Solar PV Program offers financial incentives to offset the cost of initial installation of a solar system for residential and business customers. In 2019, the program offers $0.60 per watt for residential customers. For commercial customers, they offer $0.70 per wat for 0–25 kW systems and $0.25 per watt for 25–200 kW systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

To our knowledge, the city of McAllen does not participate in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, MLGW did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, TVA produced 13% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, SRP did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2017, SRP produced 0% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, FPL did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm if city of Miami participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, We Energies, through the Focus on Energy program, provided $563,229 in incentives for the installation of 2,160 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $261/kW installed.

Focus on Energy offers two separate programs for renewable energy projects. The first is the Prescriptive Renewable Energy Program for eligible residential and small business customers.  Incentives for solar electric PV are 12% of installed cost not to exceed $2,000 for residential, and 12% of installed cost not to exceed $4,000 for small business. The incentive for geothermal heat pump systems is $650 both residential and small business customers.

The second program is the Renewable Energy Competitive Incentive Program (RECIP), which is available for business customers.  Incentives are awarded through a competitive proposal process and based on the estimated first year net energy production (or offset) of the system. Applicants must propose a $/kWh and/or $/therm amount, up to $0.50/kWh and $1.00/therm. The maximum combined incentives from the program (including both energy efficiency and renewable energy) is capped per calendar year at $400,000.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City of Milwaukee advocated to the PSC in favor of solar tariffs and distributed solar generation. In 2018, city officials published a letter to We Energies urging the utility to create large scale renewable energy options. After working with the City, We Energies created two new renewable energy tariffs: Solar Now and the Dedicated Renewable Energy Resource (DRER).

Last Updated: April 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Xcel Energy did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City of Minneapolis is in conversations with the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission to overturn limits on the City’s ability to require solar readiness or installation. Recently, the City of Minneapolis hired a staff member to act as a liaison between the City and the PUC in order to, among other things, assume solar readiness. The Clean Energy Partnership 2019 Work Plan has an activity to support the 100% renewable electricity goal.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, NES did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2018, TVA produced 13% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, United Illuminating did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm if city of New Haven participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Entergy New Orleans did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2017, Entergy New Orleans produced 0% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, ConEd did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

New York City participates in utility rate cases and PSC proceedings related to renewable energy, such as on the value of distributed energy resources, community shared solar, and micro grid tariffs and regulation. New York City also engages with NYSERDA on the structure and implementation of renewable energy programs and advocates for transmission of large-scale renewables directly into the City’s electric utility territory. New York City has also been involved in capacity valuation proceedings at the NYISO and pushing for fair treatment of energy storage resources. In its Roadmap to 80 x 50, New York City also states that they "will continue to look to Con Edison as a partner in achieving 80 x 50, and will also continue to advocate for utilities to build upon these improvements and accelerate the transformation necessary for a 2050 grid that is renewables-based, affordable, and reliable."

Last Updated: April 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, PSE&G did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm if city of Newark participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, PG&E provided $14,998,004 in incentives for the installation of 14,238 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $1,039/kW installed. PG&E offered four different solar incentive programs in 2017, including Multifamily Affordable Solar Housing (MASH), Single Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH), New Solar Homes Partnership (NSHP), Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP).

The MASH program is currently closed to new applicants and has been replaced by the Solar on Multifamily Affordable Housing (SOMAH). SOMAH is a statewide program that aims to install 30 MW of generating capacity by 2030, making solar accessible to low-income ratepayers in the state. The SASH program provides one up-front capacity-based incentive of $3 per watt to qualified low-income homeowners for the installation of solar systems. NSHP provided incentives to encourage home builders to construct new, energy efficient solar homes. NSHP is no longer accepting applications, as the program has ended per Senate Bill 83. SGIP provides financial incentives for business and residential customers installing new, qualifying equipment for generating and storing energy, applying to both renewable and non-renewable technologies.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The City of Oakland is a founding member of East Bay Community Energy (EBCE), a local government CCA with strong targets for local renewable energy systems. Renewable energy requirements are found in the Joint Powers Agreement for the agency. EBCE has a Local Business Development Plan, which sets their goals for local distributed renewable energy generation, and describes their desires for greater customer access to utility and meter data. The Oakland Clean Energy Initiative is an effort to provide more local clean energy in Alameda County by replacing an aging electricity generator in Oakland's Jack London Square area with a new clean energy source. This effort is in partnership with PG&E and East Bay Community Energy (EBCE).

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, OG&E did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

To our knowledge, Oklahoma City does not participate in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Omaha Public Power District did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2017, OPPD produced 31% of its generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: April 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, OUC did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2017, OUC produced 2% of its generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, PECO did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The city’s Powering Our Future report outlines advocacy opportunities for the City and others around increasing clean energy generation in our regional electricity grid. In addition, the City of Philadelphia is moving forward with a large-scale power purchase agreement that will result in the largest solar generation facility in Pennsylvania.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, APS did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

To our knowledge, the city of Phoenix does not participate in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Duquesne Light did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm if city of Pittsburgh participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Energy Trust of Oregon provided $6,999,654 in incentives for the installation of 16,020 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $437/kW installed. Energy Trust offers a Solar for your Home and for your Business program. In 2017, the residential incentive was $460 per kW and commercial incentive varied by project size to between $200 and $500 per kW. Currently, Portland General Electric residential customers can receive up to $0.45 per watt (up to $3,600) and commercial customers can receive $0.50 per watt for 0–15 kW installations and $0.50–$0.20 per watt for 15–200 kW installations (up to $40,000).

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

Through the City of Portland's Clean Energy program, the City partners with PGE, NW Natural, and Energy Trust of Oregon (among others) to promote energy efficiency and renewable power production through a variety of residential, commercial, and other government initiatives. The city maintains a Solar Map which indicates the location of distributed generation solar resources in the City.

Last Updated: April 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Narragansett Electric did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The city of Providence actively engages with the state to support key policies related to energy efficiency and renewable energy. For example, the City submitted written testimony in support of House bill 5536, which removes unnecessary barriers to allow municipalities to choose the electricity supplier for its residents and businesses to enable community choice aggregation. The City also supported legislation that would expand net metering options to nonprofits, including hospitals and universities.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Duke Energy Progress did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems. In 2018, Duke Energy Progress launched its NC Solar Rebate Program solar, with projects installed in 2019. The program will provide $0.50 per watt incentives for nonresidential installations, $0.60 per watt incentives for residential solar installations, and $0.75 per watt for non-profit customers.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

To our knowledge, the city of Raleigh does not participate in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, NV Energy did provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar and wind systems. We were unable to verify data on the total spending and installed capacity from these programs in 2017. NV Energy’s Solar Incentives program provides $0.45 per watt for low-income and nonprofit installations and $0.20 per watt for residential, commercial, and industrial installations.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2016, the city of Reno participated collectively with other local governments on advocating for net metering regulations.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Dominion Energy did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

Through RVAgreen 2050, the City has started discussions with Dominion Energy regarding the City’s GHG emission reduction goals and opportunities for partnerships or strategies in the areas of energy efficiency and renewable energy. Richmond’s Sustainability Manager is a co-chair of the VA Energy & Sustainability Network (VESPN), a peer network of local government energy & sustainability managers from across Virginia working to advance clean energy and sustainability. VESPN is actively pursuing a number of strategies including net-metering legislation; collaborative purchasing of renewables; and utility partnerships.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, RPU provided $261,422 in incentives for the installation of 907 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $288/kW installed. In 2017, RPU offered an incentive of $0.25 per watt for the construction of new distributed solar and installed 508 residential and commercial rooftop PV systems. RPU discontinued this program as of July 1, 2018.  At this time, RPU does not offer an incentive for the installation of solar PV. However, the RPU continues to offer support and information to customers who may wish to opt for a rooftop solar PV system.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2017, RPU produced 36% of its total generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, RG&E did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm if city of Rochester participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, SMUD provided $690,382 in incentives for the installation of 26,165 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $26/kW installed. SMUD offers the Commercial Retrofit PV Incentive Program, which incentivizes the installation solar installations for commercial customers on their existing facilities. The Residential Retrofits PV program provides incentives for residential retrofit customers to reduce the cost for customer-owned, customer-sited PV systems and seeks to make on-site, solar-generated electricity available to an ever broader cross-section of residential customers.​The Solar Smart EE (New Homes) program aims to work with major builders to design and incorporate energy efficiency (EE) technologies into new home design and construction. SMUD in turn provides at no cost energy consultative services from SMUD’s residential experts, marketing and promotions for homes constructed, and EE incentives. The SolarSmart PV (New Homes) program provides incentives for rooftop PV systems and energy efficiency improvements in new home construction.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2017, SMUD produced 26% of its electricity generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: April 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Xcel Energy did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

Over the past year and a half, St. Paul has participated in Xcel Energy’s Partners in Energy program where the city and utility partner to set energy efficiency targets and determine renewable energy strategies to work toward carbon neutrality by 2050 in the building sector. 

Last Updated: April 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Rocky Mountain Power did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

Salt Lake City was an official signatory on the Net Metering settlement with the Public Service Commission. Salt Lake City is formally collaborating with electric utility through the existing Statement of Cooperation and joint plans to deliver 100% renewable electricity to all customers within city limits by 2032.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, CPS Energy provided $17,973,232 in incentives for the installation of 29,215 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $615/kW installed. CPS Energy offers rebates for both residential and commercial solar systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2017, CPS Energy produced 6,064,100 MWh from renewable sources, which equates to 28% of its total generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, SDG&E provided $655,500 in incentives for the installation of 218.5 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $3,000/kW installed. These incentives were paid for the Single-family Affordable Solar Homes (SASH) program. The SASH program provides one up-front capacity-based incentive of $3 per watt to qualified low-income homeowners for the installation of solar systems. SDG&E plans to launch the Solar on Multifamily Affordable Housing (SOMAH) program is set to in early 2019, which will offer between $0.60 to $3.20 per watt. SOMAH is a statewide program that aims to install 30 MW of generating capacity by 2030, making solar accessible to low-income ratepayers in the state.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

The city of San Diego is engaged in various regulatory proceedings at the California Public Utility Commission. The City advocates on behalf of the City and/or the community to encourage more renewable generation adoption. The City advocated in the Net Energy Metering proceeding for grandfathering of older net metering rates that the City used to calculate its cost-benefit analysis. The City also participated the regulatory process involving exit fees, which are fees charged to customers who buy electricity from government-run community choice programs rather than traditional utilities.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, PG&E provided $14,998,004 in incentives for the installation of 14,238 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $1,039/kW installed. PG&E offered four different solar incentive programs in 2017, including Multifamily Affordable Solar Housing (MASH), Single Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH), New Solar Homes Partnership (NSHP), Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP).

The MASH program is currently closed to new applicants and has been replaced by the Solar on Multifamily Affordable Housing (SOMAH). SOMAH is a statewide program that aims to install 30 MW of generating capacity by 2030, making solar accessible to low-income ratepayers in the state. The SASH program provides one up-front capacity-based incentive of $3 per watt to qualified low-income homeowners for the installation of solar systems. NSHP provided incentives to encourage home builders to construct new, energy efficient solar homes. NSHP is no longer accepting applications, as the program has ended per Senate Bill 83. SGIP provides financial incentives for business and residential customers installing new, qualifying equipment for generating and storing energy, applying to both renewable and non-renewable technologies.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

As of June 2018, San Francisco’s Community Choice Aggregation program, CleanPowerSF, has enrolled more than 108,000 customers. An additional 257,000 customers (e.g. nearly all customers citywide) are anticipated to enroll in CleanPowerSF in 2019. To meet demand, CleanPowerSF has signed multiple electricity procurement contracts with utility scale renewables providers. The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) has developed 7.5MW of local PV capacity, anchored by the 5 MW Sunset Reservoir project. In addition, SFPUC operates 384.5 MW of hydroelectric resources.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, PG&E provided $14,998,004 in incentives for the installation of 14,238 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $1,039/kW installed. PG&E offered four different solar incentive programs in 2017, including Multifamily Affordable Solar Housing (MASH), Single Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH), New Solar Homes Partnership (NSHP), Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP).

The MASH program is currently closed to new applicants and has been replaced by the Solar on Multifamily Affordable Housing (SOMAH). SOMAH is a statewide program that aims to install 30 MW of generating capacity by 2030, making solar accessible to low-income ratepayers in the state. The SASH program provides one up-front capacity-based incentive of $3 per watt to qualified low-income homeowners for the installation of solar systems. NSHP provided incentives to encourage home builders to construct new, energy efficient solar homes. NSHP is no longer accepting applications, as the program has ended per Senate Bill 83. SGIP provides financial incentives for business and residential customers installing new, qualifying equipment for generating and storing energy, applying to both renewable and non-renewable technologies.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

San Jose Clean Energy (SJCE) launched service to city-owned accounts in September 2018 and will launch fully to all residents and businesses in February 2019 with a power mix of 45% renewable, 35% hydroelectric (80% carbon-free), and 20% unspecified system power. SJCE intends to enter into power purchase agreements with developers of wind and solar plants who will build new plants to fulfill the agreements with SJCE. SJCE plans to offer 100% GHG-free power as a base product no later than 2021.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Seattle City Light did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2017, Seattle City Light produced 93% of its electricity generation from renewable sources

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Ameren Missouri did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

To our knowledge, the city of St. Louis does not participate in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Duke Energy Florida did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

St. Petersburg's Clean Energy Roadmap emphasizes Duke Energy Florida's needed role in transitioning towards renewable energy resources, including state and utility-specific recommendations to help them transition to clean energy production.

Last Updated: April 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, TECO did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm if city of Tampa participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, TEP did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm if city of Tucson participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, PSO did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm if city of Tulsa participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Dominion Energy did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm if the city of Virginia participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, DCSEU provided $366,707 in incentives for the installation of 2,244 kW of new distributed solar systems, equating to $163/kW installed. DCSEU offered incentives to both market rate and low-income buildings, with higher incentives for low-income buildings.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

In 2017, PEPCO produced 6% of its electricity generation from renewable sources.

Last Updated: April 2019

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, National Grid did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

At this time, we cannot confirm if city of Worcester participates in activities or strategies to help spur or encourage more utility-scale or distributed renewable energy generation from its local electric utility, such as testifying in public utility commission proceedings related to renewable energy, creating a formal partnership with the electric utility on renewable generation, or participating in utility planning efforts to increase renewable generation.

Last Updated: March 2019