State and Local Policy Database

Policies Targeting Existing Buildings

Existing buildings make up a significant amount of city energy use and emissions. Cities can adopt several policies to drive energy efficiency investments in existing buildings. Some policies, like benchmarking ordinances, seek to reduce information barriers to energy efficiency investments, while more stringent policies, like retrofit mandates, require building owners to take actions that directly reduce building energy use. Cities can also seek to encourage energy efficiency improvements by offering incentives for clean energy projects or creating energy reduction competitions and challenges. This section includes city-specific information on the following building policies:

  • Building performance standards—these policies set phased energy or emissions reductions for existing buildings.
  • Retrofit policies— these policies require building owners to modify existing buildings to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy consumption.
  • Retrocommissioning policies— these policies increase efficiency by improving the operations and maintenance of building systems.
  • Cross-cutting policies— these policies require building owners to choose an energy efficiency action from a menu of options.
  • Benchmarking and disclosure policies— these policies require building owners to measure, report, and disclose building energy use.
  • Rental disclosure policies— these policies require rental properties to disclose energy use information to prospective tenants.
  • Audit policies— these policies require a certified professional to inspect the building and identify potential upgrades.
  • Financial or nonfinancial incentives— these policies provide incentives that encourage building owners to invest in clean energy upgrades including rebates, financing, tax credits and density bonuses.
  • Other innovative policies— these are innovative policies that do not fall into the above categories. For example, New York’s Local Law 33 requires building owners to display an energy efficiency grade at each public entrance of a building.
  • Voluntary programs—these programs seek to encourage energy reduction in buildings through competitive or voluntary means.

We could not find information on whether the city incentivizes or requires energy-saving actions in existing buildings. Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

Through the Green Path Program, projects that exceed energy code minimum requirements receive expedited permit reviews and preliminary plan reviews at no costs.

Bernalillo County also offers commercial building owners access to property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing for energy efficiency and solar energy projects.

Voluntary programs

Albuquerque runs the Mayor's Energy Challenge, a voluntary program that seeks to recruit 40 commercial participants to commit to an energy savings goal of 20% within 5 years. The majority of participants will be small business in underserved communities. 

Last updated: September 2020

We could not find information on whether the city incentivizes or requires energy-saving actions in existing buildings.

Last updated: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

Atlanta requires commercial buildings greater than 25,000 square feet to benchmark energy and water use. The policy covers 87% of commercial buildings and 96% of multifamily buildings. The policy holds a compliance rate of 50%. 

Energy audit requirements

The Commercial Buildings Energy Efficiency Ordinance requires building owners that benchmark and report energy and water data to conduct energy and water audits once every ten years unless the property meets certain efficiency requirements.

Incentives

Atlanta offers commercial and residential property owners access to property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. 

The city grants buildings that meet green development criteria both a density bonus and expedited permitting.

Last updated: September 2020

We could not find information on whether the city incentivizes or requires energy-saving actions in existing buildings.

Last updated: September 2020

We could not find information on whether the city incentivizes or requires energy-saving actions in existing buildings.

Last updated: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

Austin's Energy Conservation and Audit Disclosure Ordinance (ECAD) requires commercial buildings to obtain ENERGY STAR ratings and disclose ratings to prospective buyers. The city adopted the ordinance in November 2008 and it became effective in 2012. Buildings of five or more units are required to comply with the ECAD.  

Austin’s multifamily ECAD requires multifamily property owners and managers to conduct energy audits every ten years and provide the results to current and prospective residents. A qualified ECAD Energy Professional must perform the audits.  

Single-family energy disclosure

The ECAD requires audits of single-family homes prior to a sale and audits of large multifamily buildings. This ordinance was adopted in November 2008 and was implemented in June 2009.  Austin MLS, the multiple listing service serving the Austin region, includes fields for energy efficiency features of homes listed on the market. 

Energy audit requirements

Austin’s Energy Conservation Audit and Disclosure Ordinance requires all homes and multifamily buildings (five or more units) that are ten years and older to have an energy audit performed.

Rental energy disclosure

Home sellers must disclose energy audit results to perspective buyers at the time of sale, and owners of multifamily buildings must disclose the energy guide to prospective renters.  

Other requirements

The city requires multifamily properties to reduce energy use by 20% if the property’s energy use intensity exceeds 150% of the average. These properties must also provide a High Energy Use report to current and prospective residents. 

Incentives

The utility offers low- to moderate-income households rebates for home weatherization and efficiency improvements. The city also offers density bonuses to commercial and residential properties that adhere to green building standards. Austin Energy also offers rebates for a variety of efficiency improvements for residentialmultifamily, and commercial properties. 

Last updated: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

Bakersfield complies with the State of California’s Assembly Bill (AB) 802. Per AB 802, owners of commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet must benchmark energy usage. 

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

Baltimore offers residential, commercial, and multifamily property owners access to property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing for both energy efficiency and solar energy projects.

Baltimore has a $10 million low-interest loan program for energy efficiency for nonprofits and small businesses.

Through the High-Performance Market-Rate Rental Housing ordinance, the city offers a tax credit for buildings that achieve LEED Silver or higher.

Baltimore’s Housing Department assists low-income households with energy efficient improvements through their Energy Conservation Services.

Through the LIGHT program, the city matches household with available services to perform home weatherization and energy efficient upgrades.  

The Retrofit Baltimore initiative provides home energy upgrades to low-income residents at no cost.

Baltimore partnered with Healthy Neighborhoods, a local nonprofit, to provide low-interest loans and grants for energy efficient upgrades to low-income nonprofits and small businesses.

Last updated: September 2020

We could not find information on whether the city incentivizes or requires energy-saving actions in existing buildings.

Last updated: September 2020

We could not find information on whether the city incentivizes or requires energy-saving actions in existing buildings.

Last updated: September 2020

We could not find information on whether the city incentivizes or requires energy-saving actions in existing buildings.

Last updated: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

In April 2013, the city council adopted the Building Energy Reporting and Disclosure Ordinance (BERDO). The ordinance requires owners of commercial buildings (35,000+ square feet) and multifamily buildings (35+ units or 35,000+ square feet) to report their energy and water annually. The city publicly discloses the building-level energy use information on their website annually. The city provides guidance to help owners comply. BERDO covers 86% of both commercial and multifamily buildings within the city. The policy has achieved a compliance rate of 90%. 

Cross-cutting requirements

The city's Building Energy Reporting and Disclosure Ordinance (BERDO) includes an Energy Action and Assessment requirement.  Large residential and commercial buildings have three main compliance pathways: reduce their emissions or energy usage by 15% or more, be certified as a highly efficient building through ENERGY STAR, or else perform an energy audit. Exemptions exist for high-efficiency buildings.

Incentives

The Boston Industrial Development Financing Authority’s Tax-Exempt Lease Program provides non-profit institutions a vehicle to pursue performance-based energy efficiency improvements through a lease financing agreement with a vetted Energy Service Company.

Massachusetts passed commercial PACE-enabling legislation for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. Boston is currently developing guidelines to allow financing to begin in 2019.

The city’s Senior Save Program allows senior citizens earning less than 80% of the area median income to access funds to replace antiquated heating systems. The E+ Green Building program requires buildings generate more energy than it uses. The E+ program requires some units to be designated as affordable housing. Boston Housing Authority (BHA) partnered with the Action for Boston Community Development to install energy efficient equipment and materials in BHA’s public housing developments, ultimately saving $24 million in energy costs.  

Voluntary programs

Boston also has a voluntary effort. The Mayor’s Carbon Cup is a voluntary commitment open to the largest building owners and operators in Boston. These owners and operators with 1 million square feet or more in their portfolio can commit to exceeding the Citywide carbon reduction goal by achieving 35% reduction from 2005 levels by 2020.

Incentives

The city offers a tax exemption incentive for new solar energy installations.

New construction designed to meet LEED standards receive varying FAR bonuses based on their certification level.

Last updated: September 2020

We could not find information on whether the city incentivizes or requires energy-saving actions in existing buildings.

Last updated: September 2020

We could not find information on whether the city incentivizes or requires energy-saving actions in existing buildings.

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

Charlotte grants density bonuses to developments that achieve LEED Gold certification. 

Last updated: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

The Chicago Energy Use Benchmarking Ordinance requires commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet to benchmark using Portfolio Manager and publicly disclose the information. Owners must provide reports annually and have a trained professional verify their data every three years. The city discloses buildings-specific data to the public on their website. The city adopted the ordinance in September 2013 and it became effective in June 2014.

Chicago offers training and guidance to building owners through a help center hotline. Chicago also worked with local utilities to simplify the data collection process by ensuring owners have access to whole-building energy use data for buildings. The Ordinance currently covers 73% of commercial buildings and 67% of multifamily buildings within the city.

Single-family energy disclosure    

Section 5-16-050 of Chicago's Municipal Code requires residential building owners to disclose a building's natural gas and electricity costs for the previous 12 months at the time of sale. 

Rental energy disclosure

Chicago requires building owners to disclose the cost of heating from the previous 12 months to prospective tenants. 

Other requirements

The Chicago Benchmarking Energy Ordinance created the Chicago Energy Rating System. The system assigns all buildings over 50,000 square feet an energy performance rating, which will be required to be posted in a prominent location and shared at time of listing the property for sale or lease. It goes into effect in 2019. 

Incentives

The Retrofit Chicago Residential Partnership offers rebates for energy efficient appliance to residential buildings with no more than four units. The Tax-Increment Financing Neighborhood Improvement Program offers grants to residential building of one to four units for efficiency improvements including air sealing, roof insulation, and boiler or furnace upgrades. The city passed a property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing ordinance that will provide financing to commercial, institutional and residential building owners.

Voluntary programs

The city also have one voluntary program. The Retrofit Chicago Energy Challenge achieved energy savings. As 2017, it enrolled more than 90 buildings that account for 51.3 million square total.  Each participating property commits to reducing their energy consumption by 20% within the first five years after joining, and to tracking their energy and water data with ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager.

Last updated: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

California has a statewide benchmarking and disclosure policy, outlined in Assembly Bill 802. As of June 2018, building owners of commercial buildings greater than 50,000 square feet must report and disclose their energy consumption annually. Starting June 2019, the policy extends these requirements to buildings with 17 or more residential utility accounts. In Chula Vista, the policy covers 49% of commercial buildings and 76% of multifamily buildings.

Incentives

Chula Vista offers free home energy & water checkups for residents to determine opportunities for increased efficiency. The city also expedites permit reviews for projects that are at least 30% more efficient than current California energy efficiency standards. The city streamlined its solar permitting process for residential systems under 10 kW. The city offers commercial and residential properties access to property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing.

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

Cincinnati and the Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance offer residents and business a range of incentives and financing options for home energy efficient improvements and renewable energy upgrades.

Cincinnati also offers the Community Reinvestment Area (RCA) Residential Tax Abatement to city residents, which allows building owners to pay taxes on the pre-improvement value of their property after making efficiency improvements.

The city also offers the CRA Commercial Tax Abatement Program to companies and developers for new construction and renovation of LEED buildings and non-LEED buildings pending a financial gap analysis. 

The city also allows commercial property owners to apply for property assessed clean energy financing for energy efficiency projects.

Voluntary programs

The city runs the Cincinnati 2030 District, a voluntary benchmarking program for commercial buildings. 

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

Cleveland partnered with the Northeast Ohio Advanced Energy District to offer commercial property owners access to property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. The city’s municipal utility, Cleveland Public Power, offers rebates for energy efficiency projects through a partnership with Efficiency Smart.

Through Empower Gas and Electric, the City offers low-cost energy efficiency packages to residential and small commercial building owners.

Cleveland’s Green Building Standard includes energy efficiency and renewable energy provisions that qualify new residential developments for property tax abatement for up to 15 years.

The City also supports commercial properties in the Cleveland 2030 District with financial assistance for energy efficiency, water conservation, and decarbonized transportation projects.

Voluntary programs

The city runs the Cleveland 2030 District, a voluntary benchmarking program for commercial buildings in the downtown area.

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

Colorado Springs Utilities offers rebates for energy efficiency and renewable energy technology to residential and commercial customers.

Last updated: September 2020

We could not find information on whether the city incentivizes or requires energy-saving actions in existing buildings.

Last updated: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

The Energy and Water Benchmarking & Transparency Ordinance requires commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet to benchmark and disclose annual energy and water data. 

Incentives

Columbus offers commercial property owners access to property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. They city also offers tax-increment financing through the Clean Energy Financing program for energy efficiency upgrades and solar projects in small businesses and large commercial/industrial buildings. Additionally, the city offers projects that exceed standard construction and renovation requirements with more favorable incentives. Columbus launched the Community Energy Savers to improve residential and commercial energy efficiency. 

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

The city offers property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing to commercial, industrial, and multifamily residential properties for water conservation, energy-efficiency, and solar installation. The city also offers residential properties rebates for a range of home improvement actions that include energy efficiency upgrades. Dallas’s updated housing policy includes provisions to finance energy efficiency upgrades that bring low-income homes up to current energy codes.

Voluntary programs

Dallas runs a 2030 District to encourage voluntary benchmarking. 

Last updated: September 2020

We could not find information on whether the city incentivizes or requires energy-saving actions in existing buildings.

Last updated: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

In December 2016, Denver city council passed the Energize Denver program that requires commercial and multifamily buildings over 25,000 square feet to report their score. The program covers 85% of commercial and multifamily buildings. 

Cross-cutting requirements

The city requires developments over 25,000 square feet to choose one energy action from a menu of option in accordance with the Green Buildings Ordinance.

Developments may choose one action to achieve compliance: incorporate a green space into the building, install solar panels or purchase renewable energy covering 100% of the building’s electricity needs, achieve LEED Silver certification or better, enroll in Energize Denver’s Energy Program, or pay a fee. If a development chooses to enroll in the Energy Program, it must achieve an ENERGY STAR score of 85 or better or improve energy use intensity by 10% if the development is under 50,000 square feet and by 15% if the develop is over 50,000 square feet within five years.

Incentives

The Nonprofit Energy Efficiency Program provides funding to nonprofit organizations that pursue energy efficiency improvements. Property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing is available for commercial buildings for energy efficiency projects through Colorado’s C-PACE program. Denver also caps solar permitting fees at $50 and offers a $150 credit to any permit choosing the ERI or performance path.

Last updated: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

In 2019, Des Moines adopted the Energy and Water Benchmarking Ordinance, which requires all commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 25,000 square feet to benchmark energy usage.

Voluntary programs

Des Moines runs Energize Des Moines, a voluntary benchmarking program with a goal of reducing energy use 10% by 2020. 

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

Grants and loans are available to commercial and multifamily buildings through Detroit's SmartBuildings Program. The program covers both energy efficient upgrades and renewable energy installation.

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

El Paso County offers commercial and multifamily property owners access to property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing for energy efficiency, renewable energy, and water conservation projects.

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

Tarrant County offers commercial and multifamily property owners access to property assessed clean energy financing for both energy efficiency and renewable energy projects.

Voluntary programs

The city’s Better Buildings program is a voluntary benchmarking program for commercial buildings. 

Last updated: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

Fresno complies with the State of California’s Assembly Bill (AB) 802. Per AB 802, owners of commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet must benchmark energy usage. 

Incentives

Fresno EOC Weatherization Program installs energy conservation measures and provides energy education for limited income families. 

The city offers property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing for residential energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. 

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

Grand Rapids offers commercial and multifamily property owners access to property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing for energy efficiency, renewable energy, and water conservation projects.

The City of Grand Rapids' Community Development Department offers the Housing Rehabilitation Program

Voluntary programs

The city established a voluntary 2030 District, with 14 million square feet committed to the initiative. 

We could not find information on whether the city incentivizes or requires energy-saving actions in existing buildings.

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

Sections 4.3.2.B.(13).C and 4.3.2.B.(13).B grant density bonuses to developments that respectively install a renewable energy system providing at least 25% of energy demand and a combined heat and power system cover 50% of the building’s heating and cooling needs. 

The city also offers commercial property owners access to property assessed clean energy finance for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects.

Hartford also offers residents no- or low-interest loans for housing improvements through the Housing Preservation Loan Fund

Voluntary programs

Hartford runs the Energy Equity Challenge, a voluntary program that seeks to reduce energy use through discounted or free energy audits and weatherization upgrades.

Last updates: September 2020

Incentives

Henderson offers the Weatherization Assistance Program to homeowners and renters. 

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

The Honolulu Solar Loan Program provides income-eligible homeowners with zero-interest loans for the installation of solar hot water heaters and solar photovoltaic systems.

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

Energy efficiency financing is available to commercial and multifamily building owners through PACE Houston. The City of Houston fast-tracks solar panel permits for residential properties. 

Voluntary programs

Houston started a voluntary commercial benchmarking program in partnerships with Better Buildings

Incentives

Indianapolis offers reduced permitting fees for commercial buildings achieving energy efficient criteria through the City's Green Building Incentive Program. The EcoHouse Project is an energy-efficiency loan program for medium and low-income homeowners in Indianapolis. 

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

The city expedites building plan review for developments achieving LEED certification.

JEA, the city’s municipal utility, offers energy efficiency rebates to commercial property owners and rebates for battery energy storage

Last updated: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

Kansas City passed an energy benchmarking/rating and transparency policy for commercial, public, and multifamily residential buildings through the Energy Empowerment Program. The program requires public buildings greater than 10,000 square feet and commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet to benchmark energy data. The policy covers 70% of commercial buildings and 83% of multifamily buildings in the city. 

Incentives

Homeowners may apply for property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing for energy-efficient and water-saving home through the HERO Program. Kansas City's energyworks loan program provides low-interest loans to home and business owners to make energy efficiency upgrades to their buildings. The city also expedites permits for solar energy systems.

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

Residential and commercial property owners may access tax increment financing for retrofits if they qualify. The city favors projects that achieve an energy-savings certification. The city's Community Development Department offers financial assistance for residential improvements through the Blighted Properties Redevelopment Program. The department requires projects that receive funding from the program to achieve ENERGY STAR standards. 

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

Lakeland Electric provides rebates for energy efficiency improvements to residential and commercial customers. The utility also offers the Interest-free Loan Program so residential customers may make energy efficiency improvements to their homes.

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

Las Vegas offers property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing for commercial energy efficiency improvements and solar installations. 

Last updated: September 2020

We could not find information on whether the city incentivizes or requires energy-saving actions in existing buildings.

Last updated: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

Commercial and multifamily buildings comply with the California Energy Commission’s Energy Benchmarking Program. The program covers 53% of commercial and 34% of multifamily building stock in Long Beach. The city does not have its own benchmarking ordinance.

Incentives 

The city offers expedited plan reviews to buildings that meet LEED certification requirements. Long Beach opted into the Los Angeles County Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) program that allows homeowners to finance water conservation, energy efficiency, and renewable energy projects. The city also offers energy efficiency financing to commercial properties through its C-PACE program.

Last updated: September 2020

Retrocommissioning requirements

The Existing Buildings Energy and Water Efficiency Program mandates retrocommissioning requirements for commercial and multifamily buildings. 

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

The State of California adopted Assembly Bill (AB) 802 in October of 2015. AB 802 requires commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet and larger to benchmark energy usage annually. Los Angeles adopted an ordinance that builds upon AB 802 and require all buildings over 20,000 square feet (both commercial and residential) to annually benchmark energy and water usage. The ordinance currently requires buildings over 50,000 square feet to comply with the law. The ordinance takes effect for buildings between 20,000 and 50,000 square feet in June 2019. The ordinance covers 76% of commercial buildings and 50% of multifamily buildings.

Energy audit requirements

In addition to retrocommissioning, the Existing Buildings Energy and Water Efficiency Program mandates energy auditing for commercial and multifamily buildings. 

Incentives

Los Angeles offers Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing for energy efficiency improvements in residential and commercial buildings. The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) offers a range of rebates and incentives for energy efficiency projects. LADWP also runs low-income solar and energy efficiency programs.

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

Louisville offers incentives through the Energy Project Assessment District. The city began offering financing for energy efficiency projects in commercial buildings over a twenty year term. The program is similar to PACE financing programs. Commercial building owners can find energy efficiency incentives through the Louisville Energy Alliance.

Voluntary programs

The Louisville Energy Alliance runs the Kilowatt Crackdown, a voluntary program that encourages building owners to take energy-saving actions. 

Last updated: September 2020

We could not find information on whether the city incentivizes or requires energy-saving actions in existing buildings.

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

Hidalgo County offers commercial and multifamily property owners access to PACE financing for energy efficiency, renewable energy, and water conservation projects.

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

MLGW, the city’s municipal utility, administers the Share the Pennies program to provide low-income homeowners with grants to make energy efficiency improvements.

The utility also runs the Rental Rescue program to provide renters with free energy audits to ensure properties are up to code on energy efficiency standards.

MLGW offers businesses and organizations seeking LEED certification additional incentive funds.

The Downtowm Memphis Commisssion program offers the option of longer tax abatement periods for projects that are LEED certified, attain Net Zero Energy Building certification, or attain MLGW’s EcoBUILD certification.

Last updated: September 2020

We could not find information on whether the city incentivizes energy-saving actions in existing buildings. Mesa is preempted by the state from adopting above-code energy efficiency requirements.

Last updated: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

City of Miami is a partner with Miami Dade County on the Building Efficiency 305 (BE305) initiative which is part of the City Energy Project. The program requires public and private buildings over 20K square feet to report and share publicly their energy usage data via EnergyStar Portfolio Manager. The City plans to launch this program in 2020.

Incentives

Financing is available through the City of Miami PACE programs to residential and commercial building owners making energy efficiency upgrades.

The city offers expedited permitting and density bonuses for residential and commercial building owners implementing green building measures into their buildings.

The city waives and expedites permitting for residents looking to install rooftop solar. 

The Miami Forever Bond allocates $100 million dollars to affordable housing and a portion will go to fund a weatherization program for low-income home owners. 

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

The Milwaukee Energy Efficiency (Me2) program offers rebates to Milwaukee homeowners for energy efficiency upgrades. Me2 also offers commercial PACE funding and rebates for energy efficiency upgrades for small buildings and manufacturing facilities.

Milwaukee's Targeted Investment Neighborhood and low income weatherization programs grant energy efficiency upgrades and weatherization work to low income homes.

Last updated: September 2020

Retrocommissioning requirements

The city’s 2019 expansion to the Commercial Building Energy Benchmarking and Transparency Ordinance requires an ASHRAE level 1 evaluation or an accepted tune-up/recommissioning within the past 5 years for the lowest-performing buildings. This requirement is only enforced if there is an option available at no cost to the owner.

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

Minneapolis requires commercial and multifamily buildings 50,000 square feet and greater to benchmarking energy consumption and report the data to the city. 

Single-family energy disclosure    

The city requires homeowners to disclose their energy consumption at the time of sale.

Rental energy disclosure

Owners of select rental properties are required to disclose energy use information to residential tenants at time of application if applications are provided, or post the information in the property if no applications are provided.

Energy audit requirements

Per the time of sale residential energy disclosure requirement, building owners are required to undergo an energy assessment.

In 2020, the city is requring a pilot group of low-performing commercial properties to recieve energy audits at no cost. The city will use budget money to cover the cost of the audits. 

Incentives

Minneapolis offers density bonuses to residential and commercial construction that aim to achieve a 35% above code energy rating.

Minneapolis offers PACE financing to commercial buildings for solar and energy efficiency improvements. The city offers a two percent loan program to small businesses for energy efficiency improvements. Minneapolis also offers a Commercial Energy Efficiency Loan program

The city’s Green Business Cost Share program provides financial incentives for solar incentives. The program prioritizes commercial and multifamily properties within the bounds of Minneapolis Green Zones or those participating in the 4d Naturally Occurring Affordable Housing Program because they aim to expand energy efficiency and renewable energy installation in low-income areas.

The City pays for free Home Energy Squad visit to homeowners anywhere in the City with incomes below 100% AMI. This program is offered through the city's partner, CEE. 

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

Through the Nashville Energy Works program, city residents may access low-interest loans from $1,000 to $35,000 for energy efficient upgrades.

Nashville offers density bonus for developments in the Central Business District if the projects achieve LEED certification. The density bonus scales with the stringency of the certification.

The city’s Home Energy Savings Program engages volunteers to conduct energy-savings upgrades to homeowners at no-cost to income-eligible households.

The Metro Government, NES, and TVA have launched a home weatherization program called NES Home Energy Uplift for limited-income families who own homes in Davidson County. Energy upgrades may include weatherization, air sealing, high-efficiency heat pumps, high-efficiency air conditioners, duct replacement/repairs, ENERGY STAR windows, building envelope insulation, high-efficiency lighting, crawl space and attic insulation, heat pump water heaters, ENERGY STAR appliances, and/or whole-house ventilation.

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

The City has participated in and promotes the State Green Bank's C-PACE program. 

The City's Liviable Cities Initiative has an Energy Efficiency Rehabilitation Program that offers financial assistance for energy efficiency retrofits. 

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

The New Orleans Redevelopment Authority provides financing for energy efficiency projects in affordable housing units.

Entergy New Orleans’s Energy Smart program offers energy efficiency incentives for commercial and residential building owners. The program also sets aside incentives for income-eligible households.

In 2019, the Finance Authority of New Orleans shifted its model to only provide loans to properties that install EE, solar or green infrastructure resilience upgrades.

Voluntary programs

The city implements a voluntary program, the NOLA Energy Challenge, that engages commercial and multifamily buildings in tracking and lowering their energy use. 

Last updated: September 2020

Building performance standards

Local Law 97 (formerly Intro 1253) of 2019 sets emissions caps for buildings larger than 25,000 square feet, beginning in 2024, which will cut carbon emissions at least 40 percent by 2030 and over 80 percent by 2050 from the affected buildings. Buildings that do not comply will face fines set at $268 per ton of emissions that are in excess of the individual building’s cap in a given year. By 2030, this law is projected to reduce New York City’s carbon emissions by 6 million tons. 

Retrocommissioning requirements

Local Law 87 of 2009 mandates that buildings 50,000 gross square feet or larger undergo periodic retrocommissioning measures.

Retrofit requirements

NYC Local Law 88 of 2009 requiring lighting retrofits to meet current NYCECC standards, and to install electric sub-meters for each tenant space.

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

New York City’s Local Law 84 (LL84) requires commercial buildings larger than 50,000 square feet and groups of buildings on a single tax lot totaling 100,000 square feet or more to benchmark and disclose annual energy data through ENERGY STAR. Local Law 133 expanded LL84 to require buildings 25,000 square feet and greater to benchmark energy usage. 

Energy audit requirements

In addition to retrocommissioning, Local Law 87 of 2009 mandates that buildings 50,000 gross square feet or larger undergo periodic energy audits.

Other requirements

Local Law 33 of 2018 requires building owners subject to the city’s benchmarking ordinance to display an “energy efficiency grade” at each public entrance of the building.

Incentives

The city established a property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing program for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects.  The city also offers a J-51 tax abatement and exemption for energy efficient upgrades in affordable housing projects. The city offers a Solar Electric Generating System (SEGS) tax abatement. 

Voluntary programs

The city also offers a voluntary program, The Carbon Challenge, that is a public-private partnership between the Mayor's Office of Sustainability and leaders in the private, institutional, and non-profit sectors who have committed to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions by 30% or more over ten years. The Mayor's Office provides support, resources, and recognition as participants pursue different energy efficiency improvements, efficient on-site generation, and sustainability initiatives.

Last updated: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

New Jersey's Clean Energy Act of 2018 requires benchmarking by owners and operators of commercial buildings over 25,000 sq. ft. using the USEPA Portfolio Manager tool.

Last updated: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

California adopted Assembly Bill (AB) 802 requiring all buildings 50,000 square feet and more to benchmark. The city does not have a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure program. AB 802 covers 56% of commercial and 44% of multifamily buildings in Oakland.

Incentives

Residential and commercial building owners may access property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing for energy efficiency improvements, renewable energy installation, and water conservation actions. The Oakland Building Maintenance Code includes a streamlined and expedited solar permitting provision.

The Weatherization and Energy Retrofit Revolving Loan Program offers income-eligible property owners 0% interest loans for home improvement projects. The program is only eligible to owner-occupied residential properties with less than 5 units. 

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

The city offers a single incentive for energy efficiency upgrades through the Green Home Loan program, where residents may access a 3% fixed-interest loan within 48 months.

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

Omaha offers commercial property owners access to property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing for renewable energy projects.

Last updated: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

In December 2016, Orlando passed the Building Energy and Water Efficiency Strategy (BEWES), an energy benchmarking and transparency policy. The policy requires existing commercial and multifamily buildings larger than 50,000 square feet to track whole-building energy use. Building owners must report energy use data to the City annually and make their information transparent to the real estate marketplace. The city achieved a compliance rate of 40%. 

Cross-cutting requirements

Starting in May 2020, in accordance with the Building Energy and Water Efficiency Strategy, owners of buildings larger than 50,000 square feet that score under the national ENERGY STAR score of 50 must either perform an energy audit or perform a retro-commission one time every five years. 

Incentives

Residential and commercial property owners may access property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing for both energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy installations. 

The city partners with the non-profit Solar and Energy Loan Fund (SELF) and the municipal Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC) to provide property owners with home energy improvements. The program is far-reaching and provides additional support to low-income homeowners.

Last updated: September 2020

Retrocommissioning requirements

Philadelphia's Building Energy Performance Program requires nonresidential buildings greater than 50,000 square feet to conduct a building tune-up if the building does not meet high energy performance standards. 

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

Bill No. 120428 requires commercial and multifamily residential buildings over 50,000 square feet to benchmark and disclose energy usage data. 

Incentives

Philadelphia grants density bonuses to developments achieving a LEED Gold or higher rating.

The city grants commercial property owners access to PACE financing for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. 

Philadelphia’s EnergyWorks program provides loan opportunities for energy efficiency upgrades in commercial and residential buildings. 

Voluntary programs

Philadelphia is a partner and participant in Green Building United's 2030 District.

Last Updated: September 2020

Incentives

The city covers the cost to register a home under LEED for Homes if it achieves LEED Platinum.

Phoenix’s low income housing rehabilitation program provides a loan covering 75% of home improvements costs, which includes home energy efficiency upgrades, at 0% interest.

Additionally, the $100,000 Sustainable Home Design Competition challenges architects to design a home that uses 80% less energy without rooftop solar systems and costs the same as standard construction. The winning design can be downloaded free online.

The City is working with APS as part of their community solar program to add solar to low income Phoenix housing that will provide a $15 per month credit to low income residents.  The City is adding 1100 units in a LEED Platinum choice neighborhood that will have solar on every roof and $15 per month bill credit to each resident. 

Voluntary programs

The city supports Kilowatt-hour Krackdown, a program created by the Building Owners and Managers Association. The program allows building owners to voluntarily benchmark their energy performance. The city is prohibited by state law to require mandatory benchmarking or energy action requirements.

Last Updated: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

Pittsburgh formally adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure ordinance for commercial buildings over 50,000 square feet. The first compliance deadline was in June 2018, and the corresponding data will be released in 2019. The ordinance covers 67% of commercial buildings. 

Incentives

Pittsburgh expedites solar permitting. The city also offers density bonuses of 20% in height and 20% in floor area to commercial projects that meet LEED efficiency standards. 

Allegheny County offers commercial property assessed clean energy (C-PACE) financing for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. 

Voluntary programs

Pittsburgh runs a 2030 District and participates in the administration of Sustainable Pittsburgh to encourage energy reduction in commercial buildings. 

Last Update: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

The city’s Commercial Building Energy Performance Reporting Ordinance requires buildings of 20,000 square feet and greater to benchmark energy performance. 

Single-family energy disclosure    

Portland adopted the Home Energy Score Policy by unanimous decision in 2016. The Policy requires home sellers to disclose home energy performance scores. The home seller must also disclose associated costs and cost-effective approaches to improving efficiency.

Energy audit requirements

Per the Home Energy Score Policy, home sellers must complete an energy assessment of their homes prior to listing the property for sale.

Incentives

Portland offers a financing option for energy efficiency improvements through its commercial property assessed clean energy (C-PACE) financing program.

The city also grants development bonuses to buildings meeting energy efficiency standards. 

Last Updated: September 2020

Incentives

The city offers commercial property owners access to property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. Residential property owners may also access PACE financing for renewable energy installations only.

Last Updated: September 2020

We could not find information on whether the city incentivizes or requires energy-saving actions in existing buildings.

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

Raleigh offers a single grant incentive for energy efficiency projects through the Building Upfits Grant program.

Last Updated: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

Reno adopted the Energy and Water Efficiency Program in January 2019. The program requires commercial and multifamily buildings 30,000 square feet and greater to benchmark energy and water performace. Building owners must also report the data to the city. The city also created the voluntary ReEnergize Reno program to improve building energy and water efficiency 20% by 2025. Participating buildings must track energy and water data through ENEGRY STAR Portfolio Manager and disclose results to the City of Reno. The city offers technical support to participating properties.

Cross-cutting requirements

Reno's Energy and Water Efficiency Program requires building owners to achieve performance targets twice within seven years of their baseline, or pursue other measures, such as an energy audit, LEED certification, or participation in the utility-sponsored energy efficiency program. 

Incentives

Reno allows commercial building owners access to PACE financing for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. 

Last Update: September 2020

Incentives

Richmond provides expedited permitting for solar PV projects. 

The Green and Healthy Homes Initiative provides comprehensive housing assessments and interventions, integrating the areas of lead hazard reduction, Healthy Homes, weatherization, energy efficiency, and related work to raise housing standards and quality of life for all residents. It will also break down barriers to full employment for low-income residents and promote equity through training and employment efforts.

Last Updated: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

Riverside complies with the State of California’s Assembly Bill (AB) 802. Per AB 802, owners of commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet must benchmark energy usage. 

Incentives

Through the Green Riverside program, commercial and residential building owners may access rebates for energy efficiency upgrades and/or energy-saving designs during the construction phase.

Commercial and residential property owners may also qualify for property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing for energy efficiency improvements, renewable energy installation, and water conservation measures.

Single- and two-family households may also qualify for express solar permitting if the property meets specific standards.

The city’s municipal utility operates the Energy Savings Assistance Program that provides income-eligible applicants with no-cost home energy improvements.

Last Updates: September 2020

Incentives

The city offers home energy improvements through the Sustainable Homes Rochester program. The program received funding from NYSERDA to promote clean heating and cooling technologies. The city aims to prioritize low-income households. The city also offers C-PACE financing. 

Last Update: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

The State of California adopted Assembly Bill (AB) 802 in October of 2015. It will require commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet and larger to benchmark energy usage annually. California requires commercial buildings to obtain and disclose ENERGY STAR ratings to transactional counter parties and the California Energy Commission at the time of a sale, lease, or financing for the entire building through AB 1130.

Incentives

The city offers residential and commercial property owners access to property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing for energy efficiency and solar installation projects.

SMUD, the city’s municipal utility, offers a range of rebates for home energy efficiency improvements. The utility also offers new electric vehicle drivers a free level 2 charger for residential properties. The utility also offers businesses an incentive for installing an electric vehicle charger. SMUD implements efficiency programs for low-income residential customers and non-profits. 

SMUD also runs the All-Electric Smart Homes program offers developers of newly constructed homes grants to install all-electric infrastructure on the property. Through the Home Performance Program, SMUD offers owners of existing home $13,750 for a comprehensive gas-to-electric conversion.

Last updated: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

St. Paul adopted the Energy Benchmarking Ordinance to require commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet to benchmark energy usage. The policy does not require buildings to disclose data. 

Incentives

The city offers commercial property owners access to property assessed clean energy (C-PACE) financing for energy efficiency upgrades and renewable energy installations through the St. Paul Port Authority. 

Additionally, developments receiving more than $200,000 must meet the Minnesota SB 2030 energy standard. 

The city also administers the Energy Smart Home program to offer residents zero-interest loans for energy efficient upgrades. The program is available for all residents, but allows income-eligible participants to borrow 100% of project costs without a match. 

Saint Paul offers commercial and multifamily property owners access to financing for energy efficiency upgrades in new construction and improvements through the Saint Paul Port Authority’s MinnPACE and Trillion BTU programs.

Last Update: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

Salt Lake City passed the Energy Benchmarking & Transparency ordinance. The ordinance requires commercial buildings 50,000 square feet and greater to begin compliance in 2019. Commercial buildings 25,000 to 50,000 square feet will begin compliance in 2020.

Energy audit requirements

Salt Lake City requires buildings owners perform one energy-saving action. Per the Energy Benchmarking & Transparency Ordinance, residential and commercial buildings that score 49 or below in ENERGY STAR must undergo energy audits.

Incentives

Through the Economic Development Loan Fund, the city offers loans to commercial property owners for energy efficiency upgrades and retrofits.

The city provides expedited plan reviews for commercial and residential properties meeting green building standards.

Salt Lake City offers commercial property owners access to property assessed clean energy (C-PACE) financing for energy efficiency and solar installation projects.

Voluntary programs

The city also implements a voluntary program. The city established the Mayor's Skyline Challenge in autumn 2014, a voluntary energy efficiency program open to organizations throughout Salt Lake City. The program challenged property owners, managers and tenants to attend recurring energy efficiency workshops led by the City and local efficiency experts, culminating annually in the Mayor's Skyline Challenge Awards. 

Last Updated: September 2020

Incentives

The city’s STEP program offers residential and commercial property owners incentives for energy efficient upgrades such as weatherization, HVAC replacement, efficient construction etc. 

The municipal utility provides solar PV rebates to residential customers.

The city's Under One Roof program provides funding for energy efficient roof installations to qualified homeowners.

The San Antonio Green & Healthy Home program assists low- to moderate-income households with creating energy-efficient and sustainable homes.

Last Update: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

San Diego's Building Energy Benchmarking Ordinance requires commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet and greater to benchmark energy usage annually. 

Incentives

Through Resolution R-298001, the city offers expedited permitting to residential and commercial projects that meet green building standards outlined in Policy Number 900-14.

Commercial and residential property owners may access property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing for both energy efficiency upgrades and renewable energy installations.

Last Updated: September 2020

Retrofit requirements

San Francisco’s Residential Energy Conservation Ordinance requires a minimum set of retrofits at time-of-sale. This applies to residential properties built before 1978.

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

Chapter 20 of the San Francisco Environment Code requires all commercial buildings 10,000 square feet and greater and multifamily buildings 50,000 square feet and greater to benchmark energy data in ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager. The policy covers 88% of commercial buildings. The city’s compliance rate is 80%. To date, the program has achieved energy savings of 6.1% among buildings that have benchmarked energy data over the past four years.

Cross-cutting requirements

Chapter 20 of the San Francisco Environment Code, the city’s benchmarking ordinance, requires commercial building owners to conduct an energy audit or retrocommissioning every five years.

Incentives

San Francisco provides commercial and residential property owners a range of financing options and incentives for energy efficiency projects through the Energy Watch and BayREN programs.

The city also offers property assessed clean energy financing to both residents and business owners for energy efficiency, renewable energy, and water conservation projects.

San Francisco’s GoSolarSF program offers several incentives for property owners installing solar PV systems. There are additional incentives set aside for income-eligible homeowners. 

Voluntary programs

SF Environment developed the Strategic Energy Assessment, a long-term financial planning approach to managing energy efficiency and carbon emissions. Through the Strategic Energy Assessment (SEA), SFE seeks to improve the capital planning process and output to be more carbon aware for building owners. The SEA has been introduced as a voluntary option, and is accepted as a voluntary alternative to a conventional ASHRAE Level 2 audit or retrocommissioning study required by San Francisco’s Existing Buildings Ordinance.

Last Update: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

California Assembly Bill (AB) 802 requires the owners of buildings over 50,000 square feet to benchmark energy usage. San Jose's Energy and Water Building Performance Ordinance requires all privately owned buildings over 20,000 square feet to benchmark energy usage. 

Cross-cutting requirements

The Energy and Water Building Performance Ordinance requires owners of low-performing buildings greater than 20,000 square feet to conduct an energy audit or to perform retrofitting or retrocommissioning of the building.

Incentives

Commercial and residential property owners may access property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing for energy efficiency improvements and solar installations.

Through the Affordable Housing Investment Plan, the city offers priority financing for developers incorporating green building features into affordable housing units.

Voluntary programs

San Jose runs the Climate Smart Challenge, which aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 10% in 25 large commercial or higher educational buildings totaling at least 5 million square feet.

Last Update: September 2020

Building performance standards

The City of Seattle lobbied actively for WA state bill HB1257, which mandates that existing commercial buildings 50k sq feet or greater meet certain energy use thresholds. The City is also analysing a city-specific requirement that could be based on a carbon metric. This strategy is outlined in the Mayor's Climate Action Plan.

Retrocommissioning requirements

The Seattle Tune-Up Policy (Seattle Municipal Code 22.930) requires the owners of nonresidential buildings over 50,000 square feet to perform building tune-ups to optimize energy and water system performance once every five years.

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

Seattle formally adopted Municipal Code 22.920 that required commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 20,000 square feet to benchmark energy usage. The public may access building data on an open data map. The benchmarking policy covers 83% of commercial and multifamily buildings. The policy has achieved a compliance rate of 100%. 

Energy audit requirements

In addition to tune-ups, the Seattle Tune-Up Policy (Seattle Municipal Code 22.930) requires the owners of nonresidential buildings over 50,000 square feet to perform energy assessments to optimize energy and water system performance once every five years.

Incentives

Seattle offers expedited permitting to green building projects through its Priority Green program. The city runs an incentive zoning program that requires developers to provide public benefits to achieve greater height/density on their building site. Through Seattle's Director's Rule, land use departures (e.g. floor area increases) are allowed for both residential and commercial construction that achieve green standards.

The city provides a rebate for residential households to switch from oil to electric heat pumps. Seattle City Light, the city’s municipal utility, also provides rebates for cost-effective, above-code construction and for existing building efficiency improvements.

Seattle has also partnered with two nonprofits to provide energy efficiency financing and utility repayment plans.

Seattle City Light offers income-eligible customers the opportunity lower electricity bills by 60%.

Seattle City Light awarded three affordable housing projects with solar energy grants as part of the utility’s Green Up program.

Last Updated: September 2020

Incentives

The Low Income Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) provides eligible households with home energy conservation services. Households that are eligible for weatherization services. Homeowners and tenants with their landlord’s permission are eligible.  

Last updated: September 2020

Building performance standards 

Ordinance 71132 requires commercial, multifamily, institutional, and municipal buildings greater than 50,000 square feet to achieve phased energy use reductions. 

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

St. Louis adopted the Building Energy Awareness bill. It requires certain buildings to record annual whole-building energy and water consumption data in ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager. City-owned buildings began benchmarking in the first year under the ordinance in 2017. The city required privately-owned commercial buildings 50,000 square feet to comply starting April 2018. Both city- and privately-owned buildings will be required to report their consumption information each year thereafter. 

Incentives

The City of St. Louis launched the Green HELP program to assist residents with low-interest loans for making energy efficiency upgrades to their homes.

PACE financing is available for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects in residential and commercial buildings.

Last Updated: September 2020

Incentives

Commercial and residential construction permit applications are eligible for partial refund of permit fees if the building receives a green building certification. Residential buildings must meet all requirements of the Green Home Designation Standard of the Florida Green Building Coalition to receive a $300.00 refund. Commercial buildings but meet all requirements of USGBC LEED standard to receive a $1,000 refund. The city has also partnered with Duke Energy who offers free home energy checks and rebates for residents.

Last Update: September 2020

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

The State of California adopted Assembly Bill (AB) 802 in October of 2015. It requires commercial and multifamily buildings greater than 50,000 square feet and larger to benchmark energy usage annually. 

Incentives

Stockton implements one financing program to encourage energy effiency and renewable energy projects. The city allows property owners access to PACE financing for the purchase and installation of infrastructure improvements to their properties with no up-front costs for: renewable energy, energy and water efficiency improvements, water conservation upgrades, and/or electric vehicle charging. 

Last updated: September 2020

Syracuse offers one financing program to encourage energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. The city allows property owners access to PACE finacing for energy efficiency and renewable energy investments. 

Last Update: September 2020

Incentives

Tampa offers expedited plan review for commercial construction that includes provisions for energy efficiency.  Rebates are available to residential and commercial construction achieving the LEED standards. Homes built to the Florida Green Building Coalition standards also receive a rebate.

Last Updated: September 2020

Incentives

Toledo offers one financing program for energy efficiency and renewable energy. Through BetterBuildings, owners of virtually every type of building are eligible for low-cost financing to pay for high-efficiency improvements to their facilities and building systems. 

Last updated: September 2020

We could not find information on whether the city incentivizes energy-saving actions in existing buildings. Tucson is preempted by the state from adopting above-code energy efficiency requirements.

Last updated: September 2020

We could not find information on whether the city incentivizes or requires energy-saving actions in existing buildings.

Last updated: September 2020

Incentives

Residential and commercial buildings may earn tax breaks for achieving energy savings, as verified by a third-part inspection.

Last Updated: September 2020

Building performance standards

The Clean Energy DC Omnibus Act of 2018 requires the implementation of a building energy performance standard (BEPS) starting with privately-owned buildings 50,000 square feet and larger and District-owned or District instrumentality-owned buildings 10,000 square feet and larger in 2021. Privately-owned buildings 25,000 square feet and larger will be covered in 2023, and buildings 10,000 square feet and larger will be covered in 2026. Buildings will demonstrate that they exceed the local median ENERGY STAR score for their building type, or will be required to follow either a performance or prescriptive pathway to achieve compliance.

Commercial and multifamily benchmarking

The Clean and Affordable Energy Act requires commercial buildings and multifamily buildings over 50,000 square feet to benchmark and publicly disclose energy usage data using ENERGY STAR software. This policy was adopted July 2008, and implementation began in 2010. Disclosure must be done annually, and the District publishes data online. Non-compliance results in a fine. The Act currently covers 49% of commercial and multifamily buildings. The Clean Energy DC Omnibus Act of 2018 lowered the building benchmarking requirement size to 25,000 square feet by 2021 and 10,000 square feet by 2026.

Incentives

Commercial property owners may access property assessed clean energy (C-PACE) financing for energy efficiency improvements and onsite renewable energy generation.

The DC Sustainable Energy Utility (DCSEU) offers residential and commercial property owners rebates for energy efficient appliances.

Washington previously administered a low-income home weatherization program that invested $25 million in energy efficiency measures and renewable energy installation.

The Solar for All program seeks to provide 100,000 low-income households with solar energy through direct rooftop installation and community solar farms.

The DC Department of Energy and Environment offers financial assistance for projects seeking net-zero design. 

In addition to these existing programs, the Clean Energy DC Omnibus Act of 2018 carves out 30% of revenues for low-income energy actions.

Last Updated: September 2020

Incentives

The city's municipal utility offers the Water Conservation Rebate Program that provides rebates on water-saving appliances that are also energy efficient like high efficiency dishwashers and clothes washers. 

Last updated: September 2020

We could not find information on whether the city incentivizes or requires energy-saving actions in existing buildings.

Last updated: September 2020

We could not find information on whether the city incentivizes or requires energy-saving actions in existing buildings.

Last updated: September 2020