State and Local Policy Database

Procurement and Construction Policies

Purchasing and construction policies can be designed to factor energy efficiency into every-day government decisions. Policies that specify energy efficiency requirements help to institutionalize energy efficiency across all local government departments. This sub-category includes information on three topic areas:

  • Fleet Efficiency and Vehicle infrastructure Fuel efficiency or fuel-efficient vehicle type requirements for public fleet vehicles; Fleet right-sizing policies or vehicle culling requirements; anti-idling policies for government vehicles or other programs to encourage efficient vehicle behavior.
  • Public Lighting Efficiency requirements or upgrade programs for outdoor lighting (e.g. streetlights); Use of photo sensors or scheduling for outdoor lighting; Adoption of the Illuminating Engineering Society and the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance, participating in DOE’s High Performance Outdoor Lighting Accelerator, or other relevant policy.
  • New Buildings and Equipment Energy efficiency or green buildings requirements for new public buildings or major renovations; Energy efficiency or lifecycle cost considerations integrated into city’s procurement policy.

Fleet Policies and Composition

We were unable to find information on Akron’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition. 

Public Lightng

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficiency outdoor lighting, such as International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We were unable to confirm if Akron has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and Offsite Renewable Systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable systems in Akron. 

Inclusive Procurement

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Albuquerque's Fleet Vehicle Acquisition Policy and Procedures requires that vehicles purchased must be fuel-efficient with the lowest emissions within the vehicle class/type and alternative fuel vehicle or hybrid when available and cost effective. Mayor Keller has also signed and enacted Executive Instruction 34, which mandates that the City commit to developing and implementing a plan to optimize the fuel mix of the fleet of City vehicles by purchasing and, when appropriate, replacing existing traditional vehicles with electric, alternative fuel, and hybrid vehicles, taking into consideration the intended uses of such vehicles and potential for carbon, ozone, and air pollutant reduction. Albuquerque’s fleet is composed of 1.63% efficient vehicles, including hybrid and battery electric vehicles.

Public Lighting 

Albuquerque had adopted the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. The city has converted 100% of streetlights to LED. 

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

Albuquerque has installed 6.6 MW of solar capacity on City facilities. 

Inclusive procurement

While we were unable to verify that the City uses inclusive contracting practices or applies them to energy projects, the City of Albuquerque prioritizes local purchasing whenever possible and states a goal of providing minority, women, and veteran-owned business and small businesses a fair opportunity in the solicitation and contract award process.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

We were unable to find information on Allentown’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition. 

Public Lighting

We were unable to confirm if Allentown has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. Allentown has converted approximately 25% of streetlights to LED, and plans to convert all streetlights to LED by 2023.

Onsite and Offsite Renewable Systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable systems on municipal facilities in Allentown.

Inclusive Procurement

While we were unable to verify that the policy had been applied to energy projects, Allentown's Minority and Women's Business Enterprise Plan includes participation requirements for women-owned and minority-owned businesses. 

Last updated: June 2021

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Arlington’s Equipment Bureau Environmental Fleet Standards outline the county’s fuel efficiency requirements, including a provision stating that hybrid vehicles are the preferred replacements for non-public safety passenger vehicles. Additionally, the county also uses GPS technology to track snow plows and leaf collection trucks for route optimization purposes.  

Public Lighting

The county has a program to replace all existing streetlights with more efficient LED lights and has installed over 6,000 LED streetlights through the program, approximately 85% of all streetlights in the county.  As new LED streetlights are being installed, radio controls are being installed so that the system will be able to use dimming and sensor functions.

New Buildings and Equipment

The Arlington County Infrastructure Design and Construction Standard - Building Design requires energy and water efficient products including lighting, HVAC, and premium-efficient motors.  

Last updated: May 2017

Fleet Policies and Composition

Atlanta has made a commitment to convert 20 percent of its municipal fleet to electric vehicles by 2020, however, the city does not have any fuel efficiency requirements for its public fleet vehicles in place. Additionally, the City has a green fleet policy, and it is reducing the size of its fleet by revoking vehicle take-home policies and undertaking a car share program. The Mayor’s Office of Resilience is currently working with departments to assess and discuss opportunities to consider EVs and charging stations while taking advantage of the DOE SEAFDP grant to cover 40% of the incremental cost of purchasing an EV compared to a standard ICE vehicle. Atlanta’s municipal fleet is composed of 7% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles.

Public Lighting

Atlanta has not adopted the lighting control provisions of the Model Lighting Ordinance and does not have any similar policies in place. Georgia Power’s streetlight conversion program has converted over 50 percent, totaling around 37,000, of their leased streetlights to LEDs. To date 7.2% of the City of Atlanta owned streetlights have been replaced with LEDs. The City is currently in a pilot project to evaluate technologies to upgrade all city-owned lights to LED and include cameras, spot-shutters, and sensors integrated in a network of intelligent nodes that will collect data for distribution to the City's police department, transportation office, and other end users. City-owned streetlight conversions are tracked in the city's GIS system.

Onsite and Offsite Renewable Systems

In October of 2017, the City awarded a contract for the installation of solar panels on City-owned properties, making it the largest municipal program in Georgia. The facilities included in the program have been selected after extensive vetting for solar potential, financial feasibility, and structural integrity. There are 24 project sites comprising mostly of recreation centers and fire stations and represent up to 1.5MW of solar power.

Inclusive Procurement

While we were unable to verify if the policies had been applied to energy projects, Atlanta has developed multiple diversity inclusion strategies for inclusive procurement. The Small Business Opportunity Program and the Equal Business Opportunity Program promote procurement from women and minority businesses, as well as small business enterprises. 

Last updated: May 2021

Fleet policies and composition

We were unable to find information on Augusta’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public lighting 

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We were unable to confirm if Augusta has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite renewable energy systems in Augusta.  

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition 

Aurora’s SmartFleet Action Plan establishes a plan to set goals for replacing convention vehicles with “clean and green vehicles,” but we were unable to find information regarding vehicle type or fuel efficiency requirements in the city. Aurora’s municipal fleet is composed of 0.75% efficient vehicles, including hybrid and plug-in hybrids vehicles.

Public Lighting

We did not find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We were unable to confirm if Aurora has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite renewable systems 

Aurora hosts renewable energy systems at three city facilities: Aurora Municipal Court, Sand Creek Water Reuse Facility, and Facilities North Satellite Campus. We were unable to confirm the installed capacity at these facilities.

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to find information indicating that the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

The city of Austin has a fuel conservation policy in place that promotes the purchase of fuel efficient vehicles, and makes electric/hybrid and alternative fueled vehicles a priority. The current policy of the city is that any vehicle that has a battery electric vehicle option available at the time of purchase and meets the operational need will be purchased. City of Austin Fleet Services also has a GPS fleet management tracking system.  Austin has a plan for fleet electrification, which was driven by Resolution No. 20160505-025. Austin’s light-duty fleet is composed of over 50% hybrid electric and battery electric vehicles.

Public Lighting

Austin Energy has automated all of its 59,000 Austin Energy-owned streetlights and made them Dark-Sky compliant. Austin Energy has converted almost all streetlights to LEDs. Austin requires all exterior lighting to comply with above-code standards, including the International Dark Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance (MLO). 

Onsite renewable systems 

Austin has on-site municipal solar projects totaling over 1400 kW of installed renewable generation capacity.

Inclusive procurement 

While we were unable to verify if the program has been applied to energy projects, the City’s Small & Minority Business Resources Department administers the Minority- Owned, Women-Owned, and Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Procurement Programs for the City of Austin.  SMBR also provides developmental opportunities and resources for small (for-profit) businesses so that they can have affirmative access to City procurement opportunities and show productive growth.  

Last updated: May 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

We were unable to find information on Bakersfield’s fuel efficiency requirements for public fleet. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public Lighting

Bakersfield has a lighting ordinance requiring efficient outdoor lighting. We were unable to confirm if Bakersfield has an outdoor lighting upgrade program, but Pacific Gas and Electric Company and the City upgraded all 12,865 outdoor lights to LEDs.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

Bakersfield has installed onsite renewable energy systems with a capacity of 2.3 MW.

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Baltimore adopted a Transportation Petroleum Goal to reduce petroleum usage 20% by 2017. The City adopted a strategy to reduce vehicle fuel consumption by replacing the average age of the fleet, by aggressively replacing older vehicles with newer and more efficient vehicles. In 2020 and 2021 the City is purchasing 19 battery electric vehicles. In 2020, Baltimore purchased 25 Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV) Ford Escapes and 50 Ford Explore Hybrid Pursuit vehicles. Baltimore's municipal fleet is currently composed of 0.41% efficient vehicles, including hybrid and battery electric vehicles. 

Public Lighting

On December 5, 2011, the Mayor of Baltimore signed an amendment to Baltimore City Code Article 26 § 13-1, titled "Street lamps, etc." This revision added the statement that the "Department of Transportation must…ensure that, on or before June 30th 2013, all city electric street lamps are equipped with energy efficient light emitting diode lights or similar cost-effective technology." The Baltimore Complete Streets Manual, projected to be adopted in 2021, includes lighting guidelines which specify that figure selection should meet the recommendations of CIE 126-1997, Guidelines for Minimizing Sky Glow and specify that programmable lighting should be set so that lights are dimmed or completely extinguished when sufficient daylight is available. All traffic lights have been changed to LEDs. 

In 2012, the city switched the first 11,000 streetlights to LEDs. In 2014, the city conducted an LED light pilot. Although, lights do not have motion sensors, the city’s exterior street, building and sports lighting have photocells and operate only during certain hours. In 2018, Baltimore’s Department of Transportation & Office of Sustainable Energy awarded a contract to replace 12,304 streetlamps with LED fixtures using financing paid by the energy savings. This is projected to save 11,976,100 kWh per year. Baltimore has converted 75% of streetlights to LED.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

The City has installed 13 MW of onsite and offsite renewable energy generation capacity.

Inclusive procurement

Article 5, Subtitle 28 (Minority and Women’s Business Enterprises; Small Local Business Enterprises) of the Baltimore City code requires that the Minority and Women’s Business Opportunity Office (WBOO) establish appropriate MBE and WBE participation goals on each specific City contract, including energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. The City’s most recent energy efficiency project to install LED lights at a Filtration plant had a MBWE requirement of 30%. The City’s current RFP for an off-site renewable power purchasing agreement has an MBWE goal of 30%.

Last updated: May 2021

Fleet policies and composition

We were unable to find information on Baton Rouge’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public lighting

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We were unable to confirm if Baton Rouge has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Baton Rouge.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Since 2017, the City of Birmingham has tried to ensure its municipal fleet was as fuel efficient as possible for the task they had to complete. In 2017 and 2018, the City added Derive Technology to Police Vehicles that causes the engine to run with less fuel during idling; this saved on average 5 to 6 miles per gasoline of fuel.  In 2019, the City added ZeroRPM Technology to ambulances to cut down on particulate matter.  

Public Lighting

Birmingham has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. As of 2019, Birmingham and Alabama Power have upgraded the city's streetlights to LED technology with lighting controls to dim and extinguish lighting during the day.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Birmingham.

Inclusive procurement 

While we were unable to verify if these policies have been applied to energy projects, the city has established a goal of inclusive procurement and contracting processes for city projects and encouraging contractors for these projects to utilize disadvantaged business enterprise qualified businesses. The City of Birmingham has adopted the program guidelines set forth in the Birmingham Plan-Construction Industry Program ("BP-CIP"), which is a Minority Business Enterprise Program/Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Program (MBE/DBE) designated to encourage the participation of MBE/DBEs in construction projects of the city.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet policies and composition 

Boise prioritizes the purchase of alternative fuel or high fuel mileage vehicles. Regulations also set a goal of having at least 25% of vehicles purchased be high efficiency or alternative fuel vehicles. Boise’s municipal fleet is currently composed of 7% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric.

Public lighting 

Boise has adopted a Street Light Policy but does not require provisions similar to the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. Approximately 99% of outdoor lighting owned by the city has been upgraded to LED.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

Boise has installed 100 kW of onsite renewable energy systems at municipal facilities.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to find information indicating that Boise has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Boston has released a Zero Emission Vehicle Roadmap, adopting new goals and strategies to support vehicle electrification. The Roadmap presents a goal that 100% light-duty vehicles be emissions-free by 2035, 100% of medium-duty vehicles by 2050, and 100% of heavy-duty vehicles by 2060. Boston also has established a motor pool, FleetHub, using car-sharing technology, allowing the city to reduce the fleet size and maximize the use of existing stock. Additionally, Boston Public Schools has made significant efforts to increase school bus routing efficiency and replace the oldest, least efficient diesel school buses with cleaner propane vehicles. Collectively, these efforts have led to 2,650,824 fewer miles driven by Boston Public School diesel buses. Boston’s fleet is composed of 14.9% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles.  

Public Lighting

Boston has not yet adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, the Energy Reduction Plan specifies a 40% reduction goal for energy use of streetlights in the city. The City of Boston is currently retrofitting its mercury and sodium vapor lighting to LED luminaires. To date, 76.3% of the City’s 64,000 electric streetlights have been retrofitted. The Public Works Department has installed photocells on streetlights as well. Between 2019 and 2020, streetlight electricity consumption dropped 3%. The city's goal is to replace all of its streetlights with LEDs over the next few years.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

Through the Renew Boston Trust, the City has installed solar systems on municipal facilities through a performance contract.

Inclusive procurement 

The city’s Resident Jobs Policy includes workforce procurement policies for development projects, which may include renewable energy. Former Mayor Marty Walsh signed an Executive Order Establishing Equitable Procurement Goals in Support of Women and Minority-Owned Businesses in February 2021. The EO established aspirational goals of 25% minority and woman-owned business enterprise utilization on discretionary contract and procurement spending with an overall annual aspirational goal of 15% utilization for WBEs and 10% for MBEs. These policies are being applied to an energy savings performance contract to upgrade the city's streetlights and controls, which includes evaluation based on minority and women-owned business hiring goals.

Last updated: May 2021

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

We did not find information on fleet fuel efficiency requirements or implemented anti-idling or right-sizing policies.  Boulder has installed 11 Level electric-vehicle charging stations with four that are available for public use. 

Public Lighting

In 2003, the Boulder City Council approved an outdoor lighting ordinance requiring non-compliant lighting fixtures to be replaced by August 15, 2018.  In its 2016 Capital Improvement Program, the city has allocated funding to replace its outdoor lights with compliant lights..  A new city-owned streetlight system currently under construction will turn on lights at a programmed time and dim them during period of low traffic. 

New Buildings and Equipment

Municipal construction follows local building code requirements which mandate a 30% increase in energy efficiency above the IECC 2006 at minimum.  Also, there is a goal in Boulder’s Master Plan calling for the city's new construction and major reconstruction to achieve at least LEED Silver Certification, but we do not know if this has been implemented.  The city has had an Environmental Purchasing Policy in place since 2002 that requires certain products, such as copy paper and business cards, to be purchased from recycled content.

Last updated: October 2015

Fleet Policies and Composition

We were unable to information on fuel efficiency and fleet procurement requirements in Bridgeport, but the City’s Energy Efficiency and Conservation Plan includes goals and actions to shift fleet to plug-in electric vehicles. Bridgeport’s municipal fleet is composed of approximately 1% efficient vehicles, including hybrid and battery electric vehicles.

Public Lighting

Through a United Illuminating program 83% of streetlight fixtures in Bridgeport have been upgraded to LEDs. We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite and offsite renewable energy systems installed by Bridgeport.

Inclusive procurement

While we were unable to verify that the policy has been applied to energy projects, Bridgeport has a goal to have 15% of each formal city contract value go to Minority-owned Business Enterprises and another 15% of contract value go to Women-owned Business Enterprises.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

We were unable to find information on fleet procurement or fuel efficiency requirements policies adopted by the City. However, Buffalo’s Energy Master Plan includes actions to replace vehicles with high-efficiency and hybrid vehicles, but does not enact such a requirement. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public Lighting

We did not find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. Buffalo is converting all (approximately 32,000) streetlights to LED. The city has converted 2.5% of streetlights so far though an improvement program that aligns outdoor lighting upgrades with ongoing street redesign and streetscape projects. 

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

Buffalo has installed renewable systems on 17 city-owned facilities. These facilities have solar PV arrays with a combined 255kW capacity. 

Inclusive procurement

While we were unable to verify that this policy has been applied to energy projects, Buffalo’s procurement policy requires a demonstrated good faith effort for all service contracts to realize 25% of total dollar value to Minority Owned Business Enterprises and 5% to Woman Owned Business Enterprises.

Last updated: June 2021

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Burlington has installed several electric-vehicle charging stations, but we do not know if they are available to the public.  We did not find information regarding fuel efficiency requirements for the municipal vehicle fleet and we did not find information regarding right-sizing policies or anti-idling policies. 

Public Lighting

We did not find information regarding efficiency requirements for public outdoor lighting, but the city does have a goal in its climate action plan to replace all existing streetlights with LEDs.  All streetlights have photo sensors, so they only operate from dawn to dusk.

New Buildings and Equipment

We did not find information regarding energy efficiency requirements for new public buildings. Burlington has adopted an Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Policy that requires the city to purchase products that meet or exceed ENERGY STAR certification when possible.

Last updated: October 2015

Fleet policies and composition 

We were unable to find information on Cape Coral’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public lighting 

Cape Coral has an ordinance that requires the use of efficient outdoor lighting. We were unable to confirm if Cape Coral has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Cape Coral.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Carrboro has purchased hybrids vehicles for its fleet in recent years, but we could not confirm if the town has formal fuel efficiency requirements or requirements for fuel-efficient vehicle types.  The town has adopted both a right-sizing policy and anti-idling policy for its fleet.  Carrboro does not have town-operated electric vehicle charging stations.

Public Lighting

Carrboro does not have efficiency requirements for public outdoor lighting, but the town has begun an outdoor replacement program and streetlights are scheduled to operate only when needed.

New Buildings and Equipment

While Carrboro does not have formal energy efficiency requirements for new municipal buildings, the town recently constructed its new fire station to LEED silver standards.  The town has built one new building since the first half of the 20th century, with one potential new building in the next decade; therefore, a broad building policy was not adopted.  Carrboro does not have a procurement policy that has provisions for energy efficiency.

Last updated: April 2014

Fleet policies and composition

We were unable to find information on Charleston’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition. 

Public lighting 

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficiency outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We were unable to confirm if Charleston has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

Charleston has 714kW of installed solar capacity on 6 municipal facilities. 

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

In 2020, the City of Charlotte passed a Sustainable and Resilient Fleet policy and an Automatic Vehicle Locator (AVL) policy. The Sustainable and Resilient Fleet policy directs departments to procure the lowest emitting vehicle that meets operational needs. The AVL policy requires all rolling stock to be upfitted with an AVL device to collect data that will be then used to make smart, data-driven decisions about vehicles that could be replaced with EVs, where EV infrastructure would need to be installed to support EVs, fleet right-sizing, idle-reduction, and driver behavior. Additionally, the city aims to replace 100% of light-duty municipal vehicles with electric vehicles by 2030. Charlotte's municipal fleet is currently composed of 2% efficient vehicles, including hybrid and battery electric vehicles. 

Public Lighting

Charlotte has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. The city has a pilot LED streetlight project in Uptown Charlotte and uses LEDs for all new installations. The city estimates that about 18% of streetlights have been converted to LED. All streetlights have photo sensors, so they only operate from dawn to dusk.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

Charlotte's installed on-site renewable generation includes 931kW of solar PV, nine geothermal heat pump HVAC systems, and a solar thermal system.

Inclusive procurement 

The Charlotte Business Inclusion (CBI) Program seeks to enhance competition and participation of small, minority and women owned firms in city contracting and to promote economic growth and development. This program includes the annual determination of citywide minority and women-owned business enterprise utilization goals. This program was applied to a recent utility-scale solar project.

Last updated: June 2021

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

While the fleet manager reviews vehicle purchase requests for vehicle fuel efficiency, we could not confirm if Charlottesville had enacted formal efficiency requirements for the city fleet.  In 2007, the city enacted an anti-idling policy for the municipal vehicle fleet.  Charlottesville has installed electric vehicle charging stations, but they are only for government vehicles.  

Public Lighting

An energy efficiency standard for public lighting is not in place, but Charlottesville has begun an outdoor lighting replacement program for publicly-owned lighting.  The city converted the majority of its traffic signals and streetlights to LEDs and is committed to continuing to do so going forward.  All streetlights have photo sensors, so they only operate from dawn to dusk.

New Buildings and Equipment

In September 2008, the Charlottesville City Council adopted a resolution requiring city construction projects to meet LEED standards, but we could not confirm if the requirement includes any additional specific standards for energy efficiency.  We also could not confirm if the city has energy efficiency provisions in its procurement policy.  

Last updated: October 2015

Fleet Policies and Composition

According to the 2015 Sustainable Chicago Action Plan, the city aims to reduce municipal fossil fuel consumption by 10%, replace 3% of on-road fleet vehicles with cleaner vehicles annually, and reduce the energy intensity of Chicago Transit Authority rail service by 12% from 2011 levels. Additionally, the City’s Fleet and Facilities Management (2FM) Department has a policy to increase the number of non-CPD (Chicago Police Department) leased light-duty vehicles to 366. This policy has reduced the size of the City’s light-duty fleet; lowered the average age of light-duty vehicles being used by the City; and reduced fuel use and maintenance expenses. This city monitors the use of its public fleet through the Fleet Center System, which incorporates GPS technology to increase public fleet efficiency. Additionally, the City has committed to electrifying 25% of its eligible passenger vehicle fleet by 2023 and has obtained a $15M Federal grant to assist in achieving this goal. As part of the City’s fleet electrification grant, it has federal funds to install 20 DC Fast Chargers and 80 Level 2 chargers at the airports.The Chicago Transit Authority has piloted 2 electric buses and awarded a contract for 20 new electric buses in June 2018. 

We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public Lighting

The City of Chicago owns and operates all of the public outdoor lighting. Chicago is working on the procurement of a large scale lighting modernization project that will impact 85% of Chicago’s outdoor lights. The luminaire specification for all LED fixtures included in the Chicago Smart Light Program requires dimmable drivers and receptacles for 7-pin light control devices. The combination of a lighting management system and “smart luminaires” is projected to reduce lighting electric consumption by at least 60%. As of March 2019, the Chicago Smart Lighting Program (CSLP) has installed 100,000 new LED smart streetlight fixtures has part of the four-year modernization program. These upgrades account for about 37% of all streetlights in Chicago.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

Chicago has installed about 800 kW of solar capacity on city facilities.

Inclusive procurements 

Chicago’s PACE program requires large projects to meet Minority Owned Business Enterprises and Woman Owned Business Enterprises contracting goals. MWBE requirements were included in a recent community solar RFP.

Last updated: May 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

The City’s Climate Action Plan and 100% Clean Fleet Policy 2008 state that any replacement vehicles must be high efficiency, hybrid, or alternative fuel vehicles. Chula Vista installed 123 EV charging stations for fleet and employee use within the last 3 years and has recently purchased 44 electric vehicles for city fleet. The new vehicles replace aging, gasoline-powered cars and trucks that are less reliable and cost more to maintain.  For the 2nd round of EV purchases, the city participated in one of the early purchases of the Climate Mayors EV Purchasing Collaborative, a program launched by 20 founding cities of which Chula Vista is one. The program enables the City of Chula Vista to purchase vehicles using competitively solicited contracts from other agencies that meet or exceed city requirements. Chula Vista’s fleet is composed of 15% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric.  

Public Lighting

Chula Vista has adopted California’s 2020 energy efficiency requirements for outdoor lighting. The city has upgraded all streetlights to LED and any future development requires new LED streetlights to be installed. 

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

The City has installed three phases of on-site solar PV panels and three battery storage installations for a total of 4.2 MW.  The City also partnered with SDSU for a grant through the California Energy Commission to install a solar battery storage consisting of repurposed EV batteries. This is a three year project and San Diego State University is in progress of designing the battery storage.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to find information indicating that the City has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Cincinnati committed to 100% clean and renewable fleet by 2035. Cincinnati's fleet is currently composed of 2.6% efficient vehicles, including hybrid and battery electric. 

Public Lighting

Cincinnati has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. Streetlights are scheduled for operation only when needed. The City has upgraded all city-owned and operated streetlights to LED technology through performance contracts.  

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

Cincinnati has installed solar capacity on several city facilities, with a capacity of 25 MW.

Inclusive procurement

While we were unable to confirm that the policy had been applied to recent energy projects, the city’s municipal contracts include a Minority Owned Business Enterprise and Woman Owned Business Enterprise inclusion requirement corresponding to the scope of work.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Cleveland does not have a formal fleet procurement or fuel efficiency policy for its vehicle fleet. However, the City completed a comprehensive fleet analysis to identify opportunities for procurement of energy efficient and alternative fuel vehicles. Cleveland also joined the Climate Mayor’s Electric Vehicle Purchasing Collaboration. Through the Purchasing Collaborative, Cleveland purchased its first electric vehicles in 2019. 

Cleveland’s fleet is composed of 1.4% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles.

Public Lighting

Cleveland has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. The City of Cleveland Public Power (CPP) has begun a comprehensive upgrade of all 61,000 streetlights to LEDs. As of 2021, the city had converted 87% of streetlights to LED. 

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

The city introduced an ordinance in December 2020 to install onsite solar at up to 15 Ctiy facilities through a PPA model.

Inclusive procurement

Through the Office of Equal Opportunity, Cleveland has inclusive procurement and contracting processes for all projects. The city promotes procurement and contacting with small business enterprises, minority business enterprises, and sustainable business enterprises. The policies were applied to a recent solar RFP issued by the City.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet policies and composition 

PlanCOS outlines the city's support of the transition to zero-emissions vehicle fleet as a part of reaching renewable electricity and greenhouse gas reduction goals. Colorado Springs has an Environmentally Preferred Purchasing Policy that includes requirements for alternative fuel vehicle procurement and the city is developing an Electric Vehicle Readiness Plan, which will include plans converting the city fleet to electric and establishing public EV adoption. We were unable to determine the current composition of the city's fleet. 

Public lighting 

Colorado Springs has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance, but the city is currently conducting a pilot to determine the feasibility of dimming streetlights during low-traffice overnight hours. Approximately 10% of streetlights have been converted to LED. 

Onsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Colorado Springs.

Inclusive procurement 

While we were unable to verify if these policies had been applied to energy projects, Colorado Springs promotes municipal procurement and contracting from small, minority, and women-owned businesses. The city established a Small/Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Program to ensure utilization of such businesses. All contracts over $50,000 are reviewed by the Office of Equal Opportunity (OEO) to set minimum contracting goals for minority-owned business enterprises and women-owned business enterprises,

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet policies and composition 

We were unable to find information on city’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. Columbia's fleet is comprised of 6.6% efficient vehicles, including hybrid vehicles.

Public lighting

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. Dominion Energy SC, the local utility, is in the process of converting streetlights to LEDs.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Columbia.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Columbus has an Environmentally Preferable Purchasing policy that Fleet Management references for all purchases. Fleet Management ensures that energy efficient vehicles and equipment is purchased when available. The City has adopted its Green Fleet Action Plan and provides annual progress reports. The plan includes targets to reduce overall fuel use of the city fleet by 2% by 2014, reduce petroleum use by 5% by 2014, and purchase at least 50% "green" light-duty vehicles. It also integrates right-sizing of the fleet and promotion of the anti-idling policy. The plan tracks the City’s reduction in petroleum use. Since 2010, there has been a 27% decrease in use of petroleum. From 2015-2017, Columbus reduced its fleet emissions by 14% by increasing budget for efficient vehicles purchases for both light and heavy-duty vehicles.  Columbus’ fleet is composed of 11% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles. 

Public Lighting

Columbus has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance, but the city has published new streetlight design guidelines. Columbus is in the process of converting all existing streetlights to LED. As of 2020, the City of Columbus has approximately 2,800 LED street lights which represents about 5% of the City's 56,000 street light system. The City expects the full conversion from High Pressure Sodium to LED street lighting to be complete by 2040.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

The City of Columbus has installed approximately 858 kW of solar generating capacity on city facilities.

Inclusive procurement

It is the policy of the City of Columbus to provide business concerns owned by minority and female persons the maximum practiceable opportunity to participate in contracts awarded by the City. The City of Columbus Office of Diversity and Inclusion is responsible for tracking City Department utilization of minority and female business enterprises (M/FBEs) and comparing performance to targets, including for a recent solar power purchase agreement.  The City currently does not currently have a preference for minority- or women-owned businesses. However, the City recently conducted a disparity study. The City is in the process of implementing the findings of these study, which includes recommendations for preferences for minority- or women-owned business in particular scenarios.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Dallas adopted a Clean Fleet Policy in 2012 (revised in 2015). The policy includes requirements for purchase of hybrid, plug-in hybrids, and CNG vehicles, as well as fuel efficiency standards for public fleet vehicles. The City of Dallas is an adoptee of the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NTCOG) Regional Clean Fleet Vehicle Policy. Dallas’ municipal fleet is composed of 4.3% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles. 

Public Lighting

Dallas has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance, but the city uses a lighting control system for some lights. Dallas installs LEDs for all newly constructed streetlights. We were unable to confirm the proportion of streetlights between the City of Dallas, TexasDOT, and Oncor that have been converted to LEDs. 

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

The City's onsite generation capacity is approximately 4,966 kW, which includes six City buildings with rooftop solar panels.  Projects to expand solar capacity are in development as part of CECAP actions.

Inclusive procurement 

While we were unable to verify if the policy has been applied to energy projects, City of Dallas has a minority business inclusion ordinance mandating all the City contracts have reasonable inclusion of minority and women-owned business participation. All Construction projects have minimum minority- and women-owned business participation goals.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet policies and composition 

We were unable to find information on Dayton’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public lighting 

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We were unable to confirm if Dayton has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Dayton.

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Per Executive Order 3 regarding the Motor Vehicle Program for the City and County of Denver, the Acquisition of all Fleet Vehicles is to be done in accordance with Executive Order 123  (EO 123).  EO 123 requires the purchase of hybrids and the most fuel-efficient vehicles available for the light duty fleet wherever cost and reliability are similar. Additionally, Mayor Michael B. Hancock committed the city during the Sustainable Denver Summit on November 14th, 2016 to purchase at least 200 plug-in electric vehicles within the public works and safety departments by the end of 2020. This city monitors the use of its public fleet through the FASTER asset management data base software, which incorporates GPS technology to increase public fleet efficiency. Denver also uses Zonar as a GPS tracking technology within the Public Works, Parks and Facilities fleet. The technology is deployed on about 500 vehicles so far. Denver’s fleet is composed of 7% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles.  Denver’s fleet is composed of 7.0% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric. 

Public Lighting

Denver has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. Streetlights are owned by the electric utility, Xcel Energy. Denver is continuing to work with Xcel to complete a comprehensive LED replacement program for municipal streetlights. The city has completed Cobrahead conversions to LEDs for 27,771 of 44,000 total streetlights in Denver, approximately 63%.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

Denver has installed 1508 kW of onsite solar capacity on city facilities. 

Inclusive procurement 

While we were unable to verify that the policy had been applied to energy projects, Denver's has an inclusive contracting ordinance that sets goals for Minority and Women Business Enterprise contracting in city projects.

Last updated: May 2021

Fleet policies and composition 

We were unable to find information on Des Moines’ fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public lighting

We did not find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We could not confirm if Des Moines has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

The City of Des Moines has two functioning solar systems as of 2020 on a municipal library and parking garage.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

The City does not have purchasing requirements for alternative fuel vehicles. However, it requires bidders to offer alternative fuel equivalents for any vehicle standard they bid on. The Detroit Sustainability Action Agenda also includes a goal to reduce emissions from City operations as well as an action to reduce emissions from city vehicles. Detroit’s municipal fleet is composed of 3% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles. 

Public Lighting

Detroit is a partner of the DOE High Performance Outdoor Lighting Accelerator whose aim is to demonstrate practical and effective best practices to accelerate the adoption of high-efficiency outdoor lighting and impost system-wide replacement processes at the municipal level. Detroit has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. In 2014, the Detroit converted all streetlights to 65,000 LED streetlights. This upgrade has saved the City nearly $3 million in electric bills and 40,000 tons of carbon a year.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Detroit.

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes

Last updated: June 2021

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Dubuque has an anti-idling policy for municipal vehicles (Administrative Policy 7.02) and other policies to consolidate travel (Administrative Policy 7.07).  We did not find information regarding fuel efficiency requirements for the public fleet and we did not identify any city-operated electric vehicle charging stations.

Public Lighting

Current traffic lights standards require the use of LEDs at new or reconstructed intersections.  Streetlights are scheduled to operate only when they are needed.

New Buildings and Equipment

Dubuque does not have energy efficiency requirements for new public buildings and we did not find information regarding energy efficiency procurement policies.

Last updated: October 2013

Fleet Policies and Composition

The General Services Department (GSD) adopted a policy to purchase hybrid or alternative-fuel vehicles whenever those options are available for a given class of vehicles. As a vehicle is phased out or repaired, GSD reassesses the vehicle to make sure that it is the right size for the purpose. The city has also drafted an anti-idling policy for fleet vehicles and is educating new employees about anti-idling, right-sizing, carpooling, and driving efficiently. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public Lighting

El Paso is a partner in the DOE High Performance Outdoor Lighting Accelerator whose aim is to demonstrate practical and effective best practices to accelerate the adoption of high-efficiency outdoor lighting and impose system-wide replacement processes at the municipal level. El Paso adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting in February 2005. El Paso has converted 60% of streetlights to LED. Outdoor lighting is scheduled so it operates only when needed.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

El Paso has installed multiple onsite renewable energy systems in El Paso. The current total installed capacity is 200kW.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

While Fort Worth does not currently have a procurement policy for efficient fleet vehicles, the City has taken steps to address greenhouse gas emissions associated with its fleet by purchasing hybrid, plug-in hybrid, electric, and alternative fuel vehicles, including tier 4-equipped off-road equipment. The City continues to participate actively in North Central Texas Council of Governments’ transportation programming, including the adoption of a Clean Fleet Vehicle Policy and partnering with Dallas-Fort Worth Clean Cities. Fort Worth’s fleet is composed of 1.2% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles.

Public Lighting

Fort Worth has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, the City required all LED fixtures to have a standard 7-pin receptacle so that light output can be adjusted. Fort Worth has adopted facility design standards that require high-efficiency LED lights in new City facilities, both interior and exterior.  Exterior lights must have timers, light sensors, or a building management system to automate the light scheduling. The City’s streetlight maintenance program replaces burned out streetlight fixtures with new LEDs. Fort Worth has converted 30% of streetlights to LED and continues to plan for future LED upgrade projects. 

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite and offsite renewable energy systems installed by Fort Worth.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: March 2020

Fleet policies and composition

We were unable to find information on Fresno’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public lighting

Fresno has a lighting ordinance requiring efficient outdoor lighting. We were unable to confirm if Fresno has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

Fresno has installed solar panels on municipal buildings with a capacity of 22.2 MW.

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Grand Rapids does not have a formal fleet procurement policy, but the city makes efforts to purchase hybrid and electric vehicles for its light duty fleet. Recently we have made a commitment through the Climate Mayors EV Purchasing Collaborative, to purchase 20 electric and plug-in hybrid by the end of 2020. Grand Rapids’ municipal fleet is currently composed of 12.2% efficient vehicles, including hybrid and battery electric. 

Public Lighting

Grand Rapids Outdoor Lighting Ordinance includes provisions of the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance and requires LEDs to use intelligent lighting controls. The City is currently replacing all street lighting fixtures to LED. This upgrade is expected to reduce electricity consumption from street lighting by 35% and provide annual savings of $350,000. The LED replacement is scheduled to end in 2022. Currently approximately 12% of streetlights are LED.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

Grand Rapids has installed 25 kW of solar generation capacity on City facilities.

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet policies and composition 

Greensboro has adopted a policy requiring the purchase of the most fuel efficient vehicle available. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public lighting 

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We were unable to confirm if Greensboro has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Greensboro.

Inclusive procurement 

While we were unable to verify if the policy had been applied to energy projects, Greensboro has a minority and women-owned business enterprise program that establishes goals for inclusive procurement. 

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Hartford’s Climate Action Plan lists converting municipal fleet passenger cars to more efficient vehicles as a goal. Hartford’s updated Plan of Conservation and Development has a goal to convert 100% of municipal fleet passenger cars to more efficient vehicles by 2035. We were unable to find information on the City's fleet composition.

Public Lighting

In the Site Lighting section of the City's Zoning Regulations, which includes International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance considerations, regulations set maximum light levels. Working with Eversource and the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, the City of Hartford received a $5 million state grant to replace local streetlights, park lights, and other exterior lighting with high-efficiency LED models. Both city and utility-owned lights are composed of 100% LEDs. 

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

Hartford has installed 2.2 MW of solar capacity on municipal facilities.

Inclusive procurement 

The City of Hartford has a certification program that permits small contractors, minority and women-owned businesses to participate in the city's set-aside programs. The City of Hartford Energy Improvement District also issued a Supplier Diversity Policy to support local energy innovation and green jobs.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

We were unable to find information on Henderson’s fuel efficiency requirements or fleet procurement policies. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public Lighting

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We were unable to confirm if Henderson has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Henderson.

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

The City and County of Honolulu adopted a Fleet Procurement Policy, which prioritizes the purchase of hybrid, plug-in hybrid, electric, and alternative fuel vehicles. Honolulu does not have a fuel efficiency requirement for public fleet, but it plans to shift its entire fleet to renewable resources by 2035 and procure only zero emission buses after 2025.

Honolulu’s fleet is composed of  0.6% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles.

Public Lighting

Honolulu has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. In 2019, the City completed conversion of all 53,000 street lights to LEDs. This was completed in conjunction with Hawaii Energy who implements the public benefits charge-funded energy efficiency programs in Hawaii. The upgrades are expected to use 60% less energy, equivalent to eliminating 14,400 tons of greenhouse gases each year and save $5 million annually.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

Honolulu has instealled 8MW of onsite renewable energy generation capacity on city facilities.

Inclusive procurement 

The city has not instituted inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Houston’s fleet department requires that at least 25% of non-emergency on-road vehicles purchases after in or after 2020 are low-emission or alternative fuel vehicles. The Houston Climate Action Plan includes a target to convert non-emergency, light-duty municipalfleet to 100% EV, electric or hybrid vehicles, by 2030. Houston’s municipal fleet is currently composed of 5.8% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles. 

Public Lighting

Houston has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance, however the city’s streetlights have photo sensors, so they only operate when needed. Houston and CenterPoint Energy have converted 175,438 streetlights to LEDs, accounting for approximately 98% of the city’s streetlights. 

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

Houston has installed over 106 kW of renewable generation capacity on City facilities.

Inclusive procurement

The City has an MWDBE (minority, women-owned and disadvantaged business enterprises) program to stimulate the growth of MWDBE by encouraging their full participation in procurement activities and by affording fair opportunity to compete in City contracts.  The policy has been applied to the City's electric supply agreement, through which Houston purchases 100% renewable energy.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Executive Order 6 of 2012 calls for all new city vehicles to be electric/hybrid, with the exception of police vehicles, and for the entire fleet to be converted by 2025. The City of Indianapolis’ provider of public transportation (IndyGo) is in the process of electrifying significant parts of the bus fleet. Indianapolis’ fleet is composed of 9% efficient vehicles, including hybrid and battery electric vehicles.

Public Lighting

Indianapolis has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, under the 2015 City of Indianapolis Consolidated Zone/Subdivision Ordinance, Section 744 Article VI provides updated lighting standards including cutoff fixtures, photoelectric switch, motion sensor control, or astronomic time switch. Indianapolis is partnering with IPL on a street light conversion program. Approximately 99.9% of city-operated streetlights have been upgraded to LEDs.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems installed by Indianapolis.

Inclusive procurement

While we were unable to verify that the policy had been applied to energy projects, the city's business utilization plan outlines Indianapolis's inclusive procurement and contracting policy.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Infrastructure

Executive Order 2008-3 established a policy that light-duty vehicles in need of replacement be replaced with hybrids or alternative-fuel vehicles, or the most fuel-efficient and least polluting vehicles available, whenever cost and reliability are similar to traditional vehicles. Jacksonville does not have any other fuel efficiency requirements for its vehicle fleet. The executive order also established an anti-idling policy for the city fleet. Jacksonville is currently developing a right-sizing policy for their fleet as well, but it is not yet in place. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public Lighting

Jacksonville has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. JEA, the municipal electric and water utility, is in the process of conducting a study to determine the feasibility of LED outdoor lighting for the City of Jacksonville.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

We were unable to find information regarding onsite and offsite renewable energy systems in Jacksonville.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Kansas City began developing a new fleet administrative regulation in 2018 at the direction of Resolution No. 181000, which states that the City Manager shall work with other governmental entities to establish an electric vehicle procurement initiative, and ensure at least fifty percent of the City’s new bus and passenger sedan purchases are all-electric or plug-in-hybrid-electric vehicles for calendar years 2021 to 2026. At the direction of the City Manager, the Office of Environmental Quality is to work with Fleet Management to create a Vehicle Electrification Plan.  This is expected to happen in tandem with the City's climate planning process. Kansas City's fleet is made up of 1% efficient vehicles.

Public Lighting

Kansas City has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, there are outdoor lighting standards in place intended to protect the public health and general welfare by controlling the adverse impacts of glare and light trespass associated with poorly shielded or inappropriately directed lighting fixtures. Although Kansas City does not have a written policy for outdoor lighting replacement or upgrade, the City has converted one hundred percent (100%) of Traffic Signals to LED. The City is now working on street light conversion to LED, and 9.8% of streetlights have currently been converted. Streetlights are scheduled, so they only operate when needed.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

Kansas City has installed approximately 1.5 MW of solar on municipal facilities.

Inclusive procurement 

Kansas City’s PACE program encourages increased contracting of MBEs and WBEs in energy projects.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Knoxville’s Green Fleet Policy requires the City to consider fuel efficiency when purchasing new vehicles. The Green Fleet Policy was developed in 2011. Knoxville’s fleet is composed of 1.2% efficient vehicles and included hybrid vehicles. 

Public Lighting

Knoxville has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. The city completed it’s streetlight retrofit in 2019 and all streetlights have been converted to LED.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems  

The City has solar PV arrays onsite at 5 municipal facilities, capable of generating approximately 210 kW.

Inclusive procurement

The City prioritizes diversity in procurement and contracting related to energy use by encouraging Small, Minority-, Women-, Service-Disabled, and Veteran-Owned business participation in the procurement process. In 2017, the City set a goal to conduct 3.33% of its business with minority-owned businesses, 9.21% of its business with women-owned businesses, and 45.5% with small businesses. That year, the City pursued a streetlight retrofit project and named engagement with diversity business enterprises as one of 7 evaluation criteria in the selection of a contractor.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet policies and composition

We were unable to find information on Lakeland’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public lighting

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We were unable to confirm if Lakeland has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Lakeland.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition 

Las Vegas does not currently have an efficiency or fleet procurement policy, but this is a recommendation as a part of the City’s 2050 Master Plan. The City’s fleet is composed of 12% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if Las Vegas as adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, the city has adopted regional standards set forth by the Regional Transportation Commission, which mirror the industry American National Standards Institute/Illuminating Engineering Society of North American (ANSI/IESNA). Currently, 85% of city streetlights are LED. The remaining 15% will be replaced within the next 2 years.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

Las Vegas has installed approximately 6.2 MW of solar systems on forty city facilities.

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to find information indicating that the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Lawrence does not have a vehicle procurement policy that includes energy efficiency requirements, but the city does have installed GPS units in vehicles to improve efficiency in routing.  Lawrence installed one electric-vehicle charging station that can also be used by the public. 

Public Lighting

Lawrence does not have efficiency requirements for public outdoor lighting, but the city has converted all of traffic lights to LEDs and has added LEDs sidewalk lights.  Streetlights are scheduled to operate only when they are needed.

New Buildings and Equipment

Lawrence does not have energy efficiency requirements for new public buildings.  The City Manager’s Office and the Finance Department are in the process of re-writing the city’s environmental procurement policy to incorporate energy-efficiency products.  

Last updated: October 2015

Fleet policies and composition 

We were unable to find information on Little Rock’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public lighting

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We were unable to confirm if Little Rock has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Little Rock.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

The City approved its Battery Electric Vehicle and Infrastructure Policy in May 2018. The policy states that conventionally fueled light-duty vehicles will be replaces by battery electric vehicles whenever possible for all departments and offices. City of Long Beach Fleet Services is currently developing a Sustainable Fleet Policy, which will be approved through Long Beach City Council. As part of the effort to develop the Sustainable Fleet Policy, the City will track the entire Fleet's emissions and fuel efficiency. Long Beach’s fleet is composed of 20% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles.

Public Lighting 

The City of Long Beach has not currently formally adopted the lighting controls provisions of the Model Lighting Ordinance for outdoor and street lighting, or a similar policy requiring lights to be dimmed or completely extinguished when sufficient daylight is available. Sensor installation is ongoing. Long Beach has upgraded all 26,000 streetlights to LEDs. 

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

Long Beach has installed 2.5 MW of solar on city facilities. 

Inclusive procurement 

We could not verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes used in energy projects.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Los Angeles has a policy, started in 2007, to replace fleet vehicles with the most efficient vehicles available at the time of purchase. As of 2014, 87% of the light duty fleet was hybrid or EV. As part of the Los Angeles Clean Cities Program, the city committed to increasing its fleet of alternative fuel vehicles by an average of 15% each year. Under Mayor Garcetti's Executive Directive #25, the municipal fleet is required to follow a zero-emission first procurement policy by 2021. The city is also requiring the bus fleet to be all electric by 2028. Los Angeles’ fleet is composed of 19.3% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles. 

Public Lighting

Los Angeles has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, the City’s Bureau of Street Lighting has been replacing streetlights with LEDs and light sensors since 2008 through the LED Streetlight Replacement Program. Currently, 98% of streetlights have been converted in the city.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

The City of Los Angeles has installed renewable energy systems on city facilities with a total capacity of 18.6 MW.

Inclusive procurement

Los Angeles requires contractors to conduct outreach to certified minority- and women-owned business enterprises, but the City does not have specific inclusive contracting goals or requirements.

Last updated: May 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Louisville does not have a procurement policy that includes a requirement for the purchase of EVs, but tries to replace all of its vehicles with more fuel efficient ones, when possible. We were unable to determine the composition of Louisville’s municipal fleet.

Public Lighting

We did not find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. Louisville is currently working with the local energy utility, LG&E, to develop a strategy for LED conversion.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

Louisville Metro has installed solar on seven municipal buildings.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet policies and composition 

Madison does not currently have a fleet procurement policy but follows recommendations from the 100% Renewable Madison Report by procuring electric vehicles. Madison’s municipal fleet composition is made up of 11.6% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric.

Public lighting

Madison has an ordinance requiring efficient outdoor lighting. Madison is pursuing streetlight upgrades, and 34% of streetlights have been upgraded to LEDs. 

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

Madison has installed multiple onsite renewable energy systems at municipal facilities with a generating capacity of 1 MW.

Inclusive procurement

The city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes including requiring quotes from minority-owned businesses and setting minority and women-owned business targets for contracts. These policies were applied to the recent construction of a LEED Gold certified building.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

We were unable to find information on McAllen’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public Lighting

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We were unable to confirm if McAllen has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in McAllen.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Memphis is considering policies and strategies for transitioning to a more efficient, cleaner fleet with an increased number of electric and alternative fuel vehicles. The City’s fleet is composed of 3.0% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles. 

Public Lighting

Memphis has not yet adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance.  Streetlights are operated by the local electricity utility, MLGW, and are scheduled to operate only during the hours when they are needed. MLGW has implemented two LED streetlight programs and the city’s Climate Action Plan recommends replacing all streetlights to LED by 2030.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Memphis.

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

We were unable to find information on Mesa’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition. 

Public Lighting

Mesa has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting through its Lighting Control Ordinance. Mesa is in the process of replacing older City-owned streetlights with LEDs.  All new streetlights are LEDs.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

Mesa has installed several solar systems on municipal facilities, with a total generating capacity of 1376 kW.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Miami’s Green Fleet Ordinance (City Code Section 22.5) requires fuel efficiency to be considered during city vehicle purchases. The policy also calls for optimizing fleet size by eliminating unnecessary vehicles. As part of the Electrification Coalition, the city will consider electric vehicles for future fleet purchases. and plans to adopt an EV infrastructure and procurement policy to electrify 100% of public vehicle fleet excluding emergency vehicles. Miami’s fleet is composed of 1.5% efficient vehicles, including hybrid vehicles.

Public Lighting

The City has not adopted a lighting ordinance that conforms with the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. In coordination with Florida Power & Light, the City has implemented an ongoing LED Street Light Conversion Program. In 2018, the Department of Resilience and Public Works selected specific boundaries within each District to begin the conversion from high pressure sodium to LED lights. As of March 2019, approximately 20% of lights have been converted to LED.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

Miami has installed a 0.5MW capacity onsite solar system.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Milwaukee has 46 hybrid passenger vehicles in its fleet and is planning to add more hybrid vehicles, but we were unable to confirm if the local government has fuel efficiency requirement in place for its public fleet. Milwaukee has comitted to purchase electric vehicles as part of the Climate Mayors. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public Lighting

Milwaukee has not yet adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. Although there is no formal replacement program in place, Milwaukee has replaced 2% of their streetlights with LEDs. The city won a $10,000 award from the Wisconsin State Energy Office to install 54 LED streetlights which will replace the HPS streetlights currently in use. Streetlights are timed to operate only when necessary.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

Milwaukee has installed multiple onsite renewable energy systems. The city installed 209kW of solar capacity on public libraries in 2019. 

Inclusive procurement

While we could not verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes, Milwaukee has purchasing requirements such as the Resident Preference Program and the Small Business Enterprise requirement. 

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Minneapolis does not have formal fuel efficiency requirements for its vehicles or energy-efficient vehicle procurement policies in place. However, the Green Fleet Policy requires the city to make every effort to reduce GHG emissions from the fleet by 1.5% annually, purchase vehicles with highest available emmissions reduction, and inventory fleet GHG emissions. The City’s fleet is composed of 8% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles.

Public Lighting

Minneapolis has adopted a Street Light Policy standard that requires full cutoff fixtures and complies with the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. As of 2021, 78% of streetlights have been replaced with LEDs. Most streetlights operate on photo sensors.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

Minneapolis has installed onsite renewable systems on municipal facilities. 

Inclusive procurement 

The Minneapolis Renewable Electricity and Energy Efficiency Workforce Assessment provides a summary of the inclusive contracting and procurement policies that the City follows. These policies required local and women- and minority-owned business utilization requirements in a recent RFP for a solar garden project.

Last updated: May 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Montgomery County’s Green Fleet Strategy sets a goal to reduce petroleum consumption 20% by 2020 through management, rightsizing, and use of alternative fuels. The county purchases hybrid vehicles. Montgomery County’s municipal fleet is composed of 5.5% efficient vehicles, including battery electric and hybrid vehicles. 

Public Lighting

Montgomery County Department of Transportation has begun upgrading all 25,600 streetlights to LED. We did not find information regarding the adoption of a policy requirement efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance.

Green Building Requirements

Montgomery County’s Green Building Law of 2006 requires new county buildings to achieve LEED Silver requirements. 

Last updated: December 2019

Fleet Policies and Composition

Nashville recently passed new legislation to electrify the municipal fleet. According to the legislation, the Department of General Services shall establish a fleet electrification program that will require all vehicles to be zero-emission vehicles by 2050. The program will take place in phases. The city plans to have 25% of the municipal fleet be low or zero-emission vehicles by 2025, 50% by 2035, and 75% by 2040, and 90% by 2045. Currently, Nashville municipal fleet is composed 7.7% efficient vehicles, including hybrid and battery electric vehicles.

Public Lighting

Nashville has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. Nashville has partnered with Nashville Electric Service to pilot LED fixtures from several manufacturers and develop an LED upgrade plan.  The city has also installed LED pedestrian streetlights, traffic signals and way finding kiosks throughout the city.   

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

Nashville has installed a total of 1.3MW solar capacity on city facilities. Legislation recently passed the city council to approve a contract between Metro Water and a solar company to construct about 4 MW of solar at three water treatment facilities, to be operational within a year.

Inclusive procurement

Nashville has inclusive procurement and contracting processes. A requirement for minority and women-owned business enterprise participation is set for each contract. For a recent Building Energy Modeling contract for new construction and remodeling, MBE/WBE participation of 22% is required. 

 Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

We could not find information on a formal fleet procurement policy or fuel efficiency requirements. However, New Haven lists in its Climate and Sustainability Framework a goal to improve vehicle efficiency through implementing an ordinance to require the municipal vehicle fleet to meet a municipal efficiency of 30 mpg. We were unable to find data regarding New Haven’s fleet composition. 

Public Lighting

New Haven has a zoning ordinance that addresses excessive light. The City has converted all of its streetlights to LED. 

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems installed by New Haven.

Inclusive procurement

While we could not verify if the City has applied the policy to energy projects, all construction and construction-related contracts over $150,000 are subject to a 25% minority-owned business enterprise goal.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition 

New Orleans does not have fuel efficiency requirements or procurement policies for the municipal fleet. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public Lighting

New Orleans has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. New Orleans has begun an outdoor lighting replacement program for publicly owned lighting and has replaced more than 75% of its streetlights. All streetlights have photo sensors, so they only operate from dawn to dusk.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

As part of a Entergy New Orleans' 5 MG rooftop solar project, New Orleans has installed a 300 kW solar system on the Streetcar Barn. 

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes, however New Orleans has a Disadvantaged Business Enterprise program for suppliers and contractors. 

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

New York City has legislated fuel efficiency for public fleet vehicles, Local Law 38 of 2005 requires that the most fuel efficient vehicles in class for light and medium duty units be purchased; Local Law 76 of 2013 requires the City to achieve specific benchmarks in improving the fuel economy of City owned vehicles;  Local Law 73 of 2013 requires that biodiesel be used in City fleet trucks and also that the City retrofit or replace fleet trucks without diesel particulate filters; and Local Law 75 of 2013 requires the City to report on actual fuel economy for City vehicles, as opposed to the manufacturer’s list fuel economy.   Additionally, as part of the NYC Clean Fleet initiative to reduce GHG emissions by 50% by 2025, this city is planned to operate the largest EV fleet in the country at 2,000+ vehicles. The city has already purchased over 500 EV municipal vehicles. Furthermore, this city implemented a Clean Fleet Transition Policy (CFTP) as part of its published Fleet Management Manual and rules.  The CFTP requires that all vehicle replacements be as or more fuel efficient than the vehicle they will replace and that the Chief Fleet Officer approves any requests to replace any vehicle with a less fuel-efficient version. The City now operates over 1,750 on-road electric vehicles, the largest network for any municipal government. Light-duty fleet vehicles purchased during the most recent fiscal year achieved an average fuel economy equivalent of 100 miles per gallon. Additionally, the city met its goal of having 2,000 electric vehicles in its fleet by 2025 in 2019. The goal has now been adjusted to own 4,000 electric vehicles by 2025. New York City’s municipal fleet is currently composed of 24.99% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles.

Public Lighting

We could not confirm if New York City has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, the city publishes a Street Design Manual, which includes a Lighting Catalogue, outlining options for both new and replacement street and pedestrian lighting for New York City. Additionally, the City of New York provides significant funding for lighting upgrades, including occupancy sensors, daylighting and other controls at City buildings.  To date over $63 million has been allocated for lighting-related upgrades at municipal buildings. The Department of Transportation is currently retrofitting all of New York's streetlights with LEDs. New York has upgraded at least 70% of streetlights to LEDs.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

In the One City, Building to Last plan, New York committed to installing 100 MW of solar capacity on city-owned buildings by 2025. The city currently has 16.1 MW of solar installed on city-owned buildings.

Inclusive procurement 

New York has established a Minority- and Women-owned Business Enterprise program. The city set a goal of having $25 billion go toward M/WBEs by 2025 and raised the M/WBE discretionary spending limits to $500,000. Current energy efficiency and clean energy projects coordinated through the Division of Energy Management have been assigned M/WBE goals.

Last updated: May 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

We were unable to find a current procurement policy or fuel efficiency requirements. However, in the Sustainability Action Plan, the City highlights the prioritization of GHG emissions reduction in fleet management as possible policy changes, as well as an increased focus on fuel efficiency and electric vehicle use. We were unable to find data on the City's fleet composition.

Public Lighting 

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We were unable to confirm if Newark has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite and offsite renewable energy systems in Newark.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Oakland adopted the Green Fleet Resolution of 2003 which details commitments to address the operation, procurement and management of fleet vehicles in order to improve efficiency. Oakland’s Energy and Climate Action Plan includes action items to ensure that over 50% of the City’s fleet uses alternative fuels and 100% of non-emergency vehicle purchases beings zero emissions vehicles by 2030, as well as initiatives to increase electric vehicles charging stations. The city has only acquired only alternative fuel of hybrid non-law enforcement vehicles for the past 10 years. Currently, Oakland’s municipal fleet is currently composed of 9.3% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles. 

Public Lighting

Oakland’s Outdoor Lighting Standards require good lighting design and energy efficiency. The guidelines are in accordance with the Illumination Engineering Society’s lighting guidelines for all facilities. 95% of Oakland’s streetlights have been converted to LEDs.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

Oakland has installed 1 MW of solar electric panels on rooftops of municipal facilities.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the City has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Updated: May 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Oklahoma City does not have formal fuel efficiency requirements for their vehicles or energy-efficient vehicle procurement policies in place. However, the City has vehicle purchasing guidelines that promote cost-effectiveness, fuel efficiency, and low emissions. The City's sustainability plan includes actions related to fleet efficiency. Oklahoma City’s fleet is composed of 0.9% efficient vehicles, including hybrid and battery electric vehicles. 

Public Lighting

Oklahoma City has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. The City is currently working with their investor-owned utility, Oklahoma Gas and Electric Co. (OG&E) to upgrade streetlights.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Oklahoma City.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

We were unable to find information on Omaha’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public Lighting 

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We were unable to confirm if Omaha has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Omaha.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

As part of the Energy Secure Cities Coalition (ESCC), the City of Orlando has made a commitment to transition 100% of city fleet vehicles to alternative fuels by 2030. Since 2013, the city has worked to increase the percentage of fleet vehicles with some form of alternative fuel, including an all-electric city motor pool at City Hall and electric motorcycles for the Orlando Police Department. Currently, Orlando's fleet is composed of 8.75% hybrid, plug-in hybrid, or battery electric vehicles. By 2025, Orlando reported the city would have 440 electric vehicles, 25% of total city fleet. 

Public Lighting

Orlando passed a lighting ordinance in 2014 for public outdoor lighting. As an alternative to the development standard, lighting that conforms to the Joint International Dark-Sky Association and Illuminating Engineering Society Model Lighting Ordinance is also acceptable. Orlando has also installed over 20,000 LED streetlights in the city in collaboration with the utility, Orlando Utilities Commission. The total of 28,735 streetlights converted to LEDs represents 99.5% of streetlights. 

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

The City generates over 4,500,000 kWh of onsite solar energy on city facilities annually. 

Inclusive procurement 

Orlando requires 18% MBE participation and 6% WBE participation for all municipal projects. The city has also expanded its inclusive procurement practices to support LGBTQ+ owned businesses. These policies were applied to contracting processes for recent on-site solar PV installations.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet policies and composition 

We were unable to find information on Oxnard’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public lighting

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting in Oxnard, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We were unable to confirm if Oxnard has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

We were unable to find information regarding onsite renewable energy systems in Oxnard.

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to verify if the City has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

Park City has a policy to review fleet vehicle purchases with the following categories in mind: fuel efficiency, emissions, upfront and lifecycle costs, safety, and operational need.  City staff has developed a tool that uses data from fueleconomy.gov to determine the most appropriate choice in each vehicle class.  Park City also has an anti-idling policy for the municipal vehicle fleet and the same policy dictates that managers are responsible for ensuring efficient driving practices are used by employees.  We did not identify any city-operated electric vehicle charging stations.

Public Lighting

Park City does not have efficiency requirements for public outdoor lighting, but city staff incorporates energy efficient lighting (including LEDs) into lighting replacement and new fixture projects.  Outdoor public lighting in main corridors is operated via a photo sensor so it only operates when needed.

New Buildings and Equipment

Municipal buildings as well as city-funded and managed projects must meet the requirements of the city’s green building policy, but we could not find information indicating that any additional specific standards for energy efficiency are included in the policy.  Park City’s internal purchasing policy requires the city to purchase products and equipment that meet ENERGY STAR certification when possible.

Last updated: October 2015

Fleet Policies and Composition

According to Greenworks, Philadelphia has a goal to increase fuel efficiency generally in its fleet. The city replaced 70% of the police fleet with more fuel-efficient vehicles in 2009 and 2010. The city has reduced its vehicle fleet by 500 vehicles since Greenworks was first established in 2009. The Office of Fleet Management (OFM) is leading efforts to align the City’s Fleet with our clean energy goals by purchasing 17 electric vehicles for the Police Department in 2017 and issuing a bid for a mobile solar charging station in August 2018. OFM and the Office of Sustainability received a Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection grant in spring 2018 to assess options for developing a clean vehicle fleet, and expects to issue a plan for this transition in 2019. Additionally, the city is developing a Municipal Clean Fleet Plan that will outline the municipal fleet transition to EVs and alternative fuel vehicles which will be released in the summer of 2021. Philadelphia’s fleet is composed of 13.2% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles.

Public Lighting

Philadelphia has not yet adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. Philadelphia is in the early stages of a LED streetlight retrofit project. The City currently replaces broken or non-functioning streetlights with LEDs, which account for 2.5% of streetlights. In January 2020, the city released an RFQ for a streetlighting project that will convert HPS fixtures to LED throughout the City. 

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

Philadelphia has installed municipal solar arrays including at the Philadelphia Water Department and the Philadelphia Archives. The city is also in the process of constructing a solar system at the Philadelphia Northeast Airport and is identifying potential buildings for solar installations. Philadelphia is in the process of constructing a 70 MW offsite solar project in Adams County, PA in 2022. 

Inclusive procurement 

The Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) in the Department of Commerce ensures that the City is working with diverse businesses to fulfill its needs for goods and services. Each year, the City aims to reach 35 percent participation from minority, women, and disabled-owned enterprises on its contracts. The multi-million-dollar energy efficiency project at the Philadelphia Museum of Art used inclusive procurement and contracting processes. The total Minority/Women/Disabled Business participation on the project was 36.8%

Last updated: May 2021

Vehicle Fleets and Infrastructure

The 2017 Phoenix’s Sustainable Fleet Strategy included recommendations to modernize the fleet in an effort to reduce GHG emissions. In June 2016, the City Council authorized a contract to conduct a study of the light duty fleet and recommend sustainable vehicle replacement strategies. Phoenix is working on other initiatives to convert fleet vehicles, including waste collection vehicles, to alternative fuels, and to reduce emissions from public transit buses. Phoenix’s municipal fleet is currently composed of 1.9% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric.

Public Lighting

Phoenix has adopted streetlighting guidelines and policies to limit intensity and hours of operation of outdoor lighting. Maricopa County has adopted the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. The city has converted 100% of its streetlights to LED.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

Phoenix has installed 30 MW of solar on city property.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to find information indicating that the City has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

As part of the Climate Action Plan, the city has a goal of converting to a fossil fuel free fleet by 2030. Pittsburgh’s Fleet Acquisition Agency has a Green Vehicle Purchasing Policy since 2008.  This policy specifies that when purchasing a public fleet vehicle, the Board of Directors of the Equipment Leasing Authority shall require that all new vehicles and accessory equipment purchased for municipal use be the safest, most fuel-efficient and “green” vehicle in the applicable class required for the job. Pittsburgh’s fleet is composed of 4.1% efficient vehicles, including hybrid and battery electric vehicles.

Public Lighting

Pittsburgh adopted an ordinance in 2011 that requires efficient outdoor lighting and includes cut-off, uplight, and glare specifications. Additionally, in 2014 changes to the lighting code were made to allow the placement of LEDs in parking garages.  During the first phase of their LED installation program , the city purchased and installed 3,500 new LED streetlights in the business corridor and city operated athletic fields, the second phase of this program has already started and it is planned to finish with the remaining 36,500 lighting replacements in residential corridors. The lighting includes controls to activate and deactivate lighting as needed. Approximately 9% of streetlights have currently been converted to LEDs.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite renewable energy systems in Pittsburgh.

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to find information indicating that the City has active inclusive procurement and contracting processes, but it has established a Roadmap to Inclusive Procurement.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Portland has enacted several policies to encourage efficient vehicle procurement and operation. The city’s fleet service has a policy of purchasing the most efficient vehicle that meets work requirements. The city has also set a goal to convert 20% of the city’s fleet to electric vehicles by 2030. As of July 2016, 20% of EV-eligible vehicles were electric.  Additionally, The City of Portland currently utilizes onboard fuel system telematics and has GPS installed on over 600 vehicles to improve efficiency in their use. Portland’s fleet is composed of 14% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles. 

Public Lighting

Portland has not yet adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, the standard practice in the City has been to install photo-electric relay for all street lights that turn off the lights when sufficient day light is available. Portland's 1990 Energy Policy established the requirement to implement energy measures with simple paybacks of ten years or less, which has led to various roadway and traffic lighting retrofits. Conversion of all Portland streetlights to LEDs is completed. Portland is also a founding member of the DOE-sponsored Municipal Solid State Lighting Consortium to exchange technical data, design, product research, and pricing of LEDs among city owned streetlight systems. 

Onsite renewable systems

Portland has installed 700 kW of solar systems on municipal facilities. Portland Fire and Rescue completed the City’s first solar + battery storage project in 2019.

Inclusive procurement

While we were unable to confirm that they had been applied to energy projects, Portland has procurement policies that incentivize work with firms that are certified as Disadvantaged, Minority-Owned, Women-Owned, Emerging Small Businesses, and Service Disabled Veterans Business Enterprises. The Portland City Council has adopted a Model Community Benefits Agreement for its agencies

Last updated: May 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

In accordance with the City Code (Chapter II, Article I, Sec. 2-12), when the city purchases motor vehicles for its municipal operations, each vehicle purchased must be the most fuel-efficient model available that will fulfill the intended municipal function. In 2019, the city included funding in its Master Lease to procure 15 new EVs and install charging infrastructure, with 3 EVs purchased as of mid-2021. In early 2020, the City leveraged incentives and successfully installed six EV charging stations for municipal and public use at the public safety garage. We were unable to find information on the overall composition of Providence’s fleet. 

Public Lighting

The City has not adopted controls provisions of the Model Lighting Ordinance for outdoor and street lighting. Currently, the City’s new LED streetlighting and controls management company remotely dims about half of the City’s streetlighting by 40% late night to early morning. New recent guidelines enacted by the RI Public Utilities Commission (RIPUC) will allow the City to expand that to 50% dimming for six hours (11pm-5am). All streetlights have photo sensors, so they only operate from dawn to dusk. The City of Providence purchased its roadway lighting in February 2016 from the Utility, National Grid and hired a third party to retrofit the entire system, including floodlighting, to LED technology, and incorporate open-portal controls for dimming. As such, 100% of the City's streetlights are now LEDs.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

Providence had installed 4.75 MW of solar capacity on city facilities.

Inclusive procurement

While we were unable to find information on the policy's application to energy projects, the City has Minority Business Enterprise participation policy that sets a goal of 20% WMBE participation. 

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet policies and composition 

We were unable to find information on Provo’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public lighting 

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We were unable to confirm if Provo has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Provo.

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

In 2007, Raleigh City Council established a goal of reducing fossil fuel consumption by 20 percent from 2006 levels for the city fleet. The City of Raleigh’s policy on purchasing energy efficient vehicles is noted in the City’s Operating Budget Manual. This city considers alternative fueled and hybrid vehicles whenever possible. Raleigh’s fleet is composed of 6.6% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles.

Public Lighting

Raleigh's Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) does not have requirements for automatic lighting controls. However, the city has established light and noise pollution controls that seek to minimize light pollution, glare, light trespass; conserve energy and resources while maintaining nighttime safety, utility, security, and productivity; and curtail the degradation of the night-time visual environment. The City of Raleigh has converted approximately 30,000 of its 35,000 streetlights to LED fixtures. This conversion was completed in 2016 and accounted for approximately 85% of Raleigh's streetlights.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding the capacity of onsite and offsite renewable energy systems in Raleigh.

Inclusive procurement

While we were unable to verify if this has been applied to energy projects, the City’s goal is to contract 15% of the contract amount to Certified MWBEs on construction projects of $300,000 or more (or contracts of $100,000 or more that include any State funding). The goal breakdown is eight percent for minorities and seven percent for non-minority women.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

We were unable to find information on a procurement policy or fuel efficient requirements. However, the Master Plan noted that the city would consider the adoption of a sustainable procurement guidelines, including City fleet vehicles. In addition, the city's Climate Action Plan includes a goal to reduce carbon emissions from the city's fleet 28% by 2025. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition. 

Public Lighting 

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We were unable to confirm if Reno has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite and offsite renewable energy systems in Reno.

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Richmond does not have efficiency requirements for the city fleet, but the city is developing a clean fleet transition plan to move its fleet to lower/zero emission vehicles starting with passenger and light duty vehicles. While the city does not have an official efficiency requirement, Richmond is working with VA Clean Cities to analyze costs and benefits to electrifying the city’s fleet. Richmond’s municipal fleet is composed of 0.1% efficient vehicles, including battery electric vehicles. 

Public Lighting

We were unable to confirm if Richmond has adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, all streetlights in Richmond have photo sensors and only operate from dusk to dawn. Richmond’s Streetlight Utility operates and maintains approximately 37,000 city-owned streetlights. The City has begun a multi-year process to upgrade lights to LEDs.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Richmond, but the city is conducting feasibility studies for solar installations on city facilities. 

Inclusive procurement 

Richmond City Code Section 21.216 establishes requirements for increasing the number of minority business enterprises and emerging small businesses that participate meaningfully in all contracts, which have been applied to LEED building projects.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition 

Riverside’s Green Action Plan targets a 5% reduction in mobile source pollution by 2020 and increase the number of clean fleet vehicles to at least 60%. Riverside regularly purchases alternative fuel vehicles. The City of Riverside fleet is also subject to state regulations, which shape the purchasing model to include alternative fuels such as CNG, EV, and LPG. Riverside’s fleet is composed of 17% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles. 

Public Lighting

Riverside’s City Council adopted an Outdoor Lighting Ordinance that complies with the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. The ordinance became effective in December 2018. The City has begun upgrading all streetlights to LEDs. Currently, 5% of lights have been upgraded and the project is expected to be completed by 2023.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

Riverside has installed 8 MW onsite renewable energy capacity on municipal facilities.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to find information indicating that the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition 

We could not confirm if Rochester has a fleet procurement policy or fuel efficiency requirements. However, the City is adding electric vehicles to its fleet and will continue to replace decommissioned vehicles with more efficient vehicles. Rochester is a part of the Electric Vehicles Purchasing Collaborative. Rochester’s fleet is composed of 2.9% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles.

Public Lighting

We did not find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. The City of Rochester focused on energy efficient LED lighting upgrades as an opportunity to save energy and improve efficiency across 4.4 million-square feet of its building portfolio. The lighting strategies include interior LED fixture upgrades in many facilities; change-out of 25,000 fluorescent tubes with plug and play LED; and upgrades of 15,000 street lights to LED, with integrated cloud-based controls.The City has upgraded over 50% of streetlights to LED.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

Rochester has a Power Purchase Agreement with Solar Liberty to generate renewable energy that powers City Hall and the Central Vehicle Maintenance Facility. The offsite system is a 2MW solar field located in Rochester.

Inclusive procurement 

While we unable to verify that the policy has been applied to energy projects, the City has minority and women-owned business enterprise participation goals in multiple departments.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Sacramento’s City Fleet Sustainability Policy was updated in December 2017 to include a 50% alternative fuel goal and zero-emission vehicle commitments. In December 2017, Sacramento City Council adopted an Electric Vehicle Strategy, which sets targets for transportation electrification by 2025, including 75,000 zero-emission vehicles. Sacramento established a zero-emission vehicle first committment and set requirements for minimum annual light-duty purchases to be 50% ZEV by 2018 and 75% ZEV by 2020. Sacramento’s fleet management has gained national recognition for its green fleet efforts, including high ranking in 100 Best Fleets, Leading Fleets, and Government Green Fleet Awards. Such practices have led to an 18% reduction in total vehicles, 3.69% reduction in total fuel consumption, and 1.97% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions as of 2020. ACEEE could not verify Sacramento’s current fleet composition, but the city has procured 57 zero-emission vehicles.

Public Lighting

We did not find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, California has adopted lighting standards. Sacramento has installed LEDs in all traffic signals. The City has upgraded approximately one-third of the streetlights to LEDs and are planning to complete the rest in the near future, which will save 11 million KWF annually.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

Sacramento operates over 4 MW of solar photovoltaics at city facilities.

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to find information indicating that the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Saint Paul prioritizes replacing vehicles if the replacement are hybrid, electric, or clean diesel. The city’s fleet is composed of 1.5% efficient vehicles, including hybrid and battery electric vehicles.

Public Lighting

Saint Paul has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. However, all streetlights in Saint Paul are controlled by optical sensors that extinguish when sufficient light is available. Through Saint Paul’s outdoor lighting replacement and upgrade program, 38% of streetlights owned by the City have been converted to LEDs. 

Onsite and Offsite Renewable Systems 

Saint Paul has installed approximately 500 kW of solar on city-owned facilities.

Inclusive procurement

The Mayor’s Office has a directive for all city departments to have 20% of all purchases be made from CERT vendors. The CERT Vendor Program includes certification of Minority-Owned Business Enterprise (MBE), Women-Owned Business Enterprise (WBE), and Small Business Enterprise (SBE). The city complying with the CERT requirements as it uses the $5 million Green Energy Revolving Loan Fund to replace all fluorescent and incandescent lamps with LEDs in all city-owned facilities over the next two years.

Last updated: May 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition 

Salt Lake City’s Fleet Procurement Policy states that the city will procure electric and hybrid vehicles when practical. The city also has fuel efficiency requirements and tail pipe emissions reduction plans. Salt Lake City’s fleet is currently composed of 7.4% efficient vehicles, including hybrid and battery electric vehicles.  

Public Lighting

The city has begun a long-term program to convert all streetlights to high efficiency fixtures over the next 15 years. Salt Lake City Public Utilities web page states "The initial capital improvement program for street lighting in 2012 included a metric of converting the City’s entire inventory to high-energy efficiency LED lamps by 2021.” As of 2018, the city had converted 60% of streetlights.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

Salt Lake City has installed 3MW of solar generation capacity on city facilities. 

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify that the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

San Antonio’s environmental fleet policy (City Ordinance 2010-04-15-0335) includes a directive to calculate the total cost of ownership when a vehicle purchase is considered and establishes emissions reductions targets. The city aims to add 25 electric vehicles to the municipal fleet in 2021. San Antonio plans to update the policy soon. San Antonio’s fleet is composed of 11% efficient vehicles, including hybrid and battery electric vehicles.

Public Lighting

San Antonio’s Ordinance 2018-02-08-0079 complies with the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance and applies to the City's Military Lighting Overlay District. The City’s standard procedure is to replace any light with an LED. San Antonio’s municipal utility has entered into an outdoor lighting replacement contract. 79% of streetlights have been converted to LED. Per the Climate Action & Adaptation Plan (CAAP), the city's goal is to convert 100% of the streetlights to LEDs by 2021.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

San Antonio has installed multiple onsite renewable energy sustems and is currently in the process of installing solar on additional buildings. On average, each existing site produces 2,338 kWh per month.
 

Inclusive procurement 

While we were unable to verify that this policy has been applied to energy projects, San Antonio has an ordinance governing its small, minority, and women-owned business program.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Current policy (Administrative Regulation 90.73) calls for all new vehicles to be 50% better than CAFE standards by 2020 and for a 5% reduction in vehicle miles traveled compared to the previous year. The policy also calls for operating all vehicles in a manner that ensures maximum fuel conservation including keeping tires inflated to the recommended pressure, using air conditioning selectively, and minimizing public vehicle idling. Additionally, this policy commits the city to investigate the benefit, availability and use of lower carbon fuels, low emission & zero emission vehicles, including but not limited to Super Ultra Low Emission Vehicles, Partial Zero Emission Vehicles, and Zero Emission Vehicles such as electric vehicles. Additionally, San Diego’s Climate Action Plan sets a goal that 50% of municipal vehicles are zero-emission vehicles by 2020, followed by 90% by 2035. San Diego’s municipal fleet is composed of 8.4% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles. 

Public Lighting

San Diego’s Ordinance 20186 requires efficient outdoor lighting. Approximately 38,000 inefficient fixtures were retrofitted to LEDs in 2012-2013. Phase 1 of the Outdoor Lighting Upgrade and Smart Sensor Installation Project took place from Fall 2018 to Summer 2019 and included 4,792 light fixture retrofits to LED. As such, 63% of the City’s outdoor lighting has been upgraded to LEDs. Phase 2 of the Outdoor Lighting Upgrade and Smart Sensor Installation Project is planned to include another 3,800 outdoor fixture upgrades, bringing the total to 69%.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

San Diego has installed 6,000 kW of solar capacity on city facilities.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to find information regarding inclusive procurement and contracting processes in San Diego.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

San Francisco's Zero Emissions Vehicle Municipal Fleet Ordinance requires 75% of light duty vehicles parked at city facilities (8500 pounds curb weight or less) must be ZEV by 2022. Of this number, no more than 25% can be PHEV.  Additionally, all trolley busses, historic cable cars, and light rail vehicles are electric – and electricity for the entire electric transit fleet is 100% GHG-free, supplied by San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. San Francisco’s 2017 Alternative Fuel Vehicle Readiness Plan set objectives for transitioning to alternative fueled and fuel-efficient vehicles for public fleets. In 2017, San Francisco adopted the Zero Emission Vehicle Municipal Fleet Ordinance, which sets requirements zero-emission vehicle procurement. San Francisco Municipal Transit Agency operates the world’s largest electric trolley fleet. All trolley buses, cable cars, and light rail vehicles are electric. San Francisco’s fleet is composed of 19% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric.

Public Lighting

San Francisco follows California Title 24 Party 6 Energy Standards for outdoor lighting. San Francisco Public Utilities Commission has completed conversion of all 18,500 city-owned streetlights to LEDs. Both prior and updated LED fixtures use photocell controls.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

San Francisco has installed onsite renewable energy systems on municipal facilities. The city has installed over 2.9 MW of solar PV on city facilities, as well as 5 MW of solar on the Sunset Reservoir. 

Inclusive procurement 

The city does not currently have inclusive procurement and contracting processes that target marginalized communities for city energy project contracts.

Last updated: May 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

San Jose’s Green Fleet Policy guides staff through vehicle procurement and requires consideration of alternative fuel options to reduce carbon emissions.  The City’s current plan is to replace internal combustion engine vehicles in the light duty fleet (except PD & Fire) with EVs as they become due for retirement, if a suitable EV solution exists. San Jose’s upcoming Electric Mobility Roadmap proposed to convert 89 of its non-police sedans that are more than 10 years old in the next two years. Doing so would make 98% of the non-police sedans plug-in electric, and 69% fully electric. San Jose’s municipal fleet is composed of 20% efficient vehicles hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles.

Public Lighting

San José’s Department of Transportation follows and references IES’ roadway guide for practice but there is no formal adoption of this or the Model Lighting Ordinance for streetlights or outdoor lighting. The Public Streetlight Design Guide, adopted in February 2011, has a goal to replace 100% of streetlights with zero-emission lighting. Voter approval of Measure T (The Disaster Preparedness, Public Safety and Infrastructure Bond) in November 2018 is allowing the Departments of Transportation (DOT) and Public Works (DPW) to implement a complete conversion of the City’s remaining outdoor lighting inventory to LEDs. In partnership with PG&E, the City’s remaining streetlight inventory of 37,000 lights will be converted by 2021 and the City’s remaining 12,000 outdoor park/facility lights will be converted by 2024. LED lighting and controls upgrades will capture additional energy savings and GHG reductions. This will result in energy savings of more than 50 percent upon completion. As of 2019, approximately 53% of the City's streetlights have been converted to LEDs.

Onsite renewable systems 

San Jose has installed on-site solar systems. The current combined capacity of these systems is 6.5 MW.

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to verify if the City has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: May 2021

Fleet policies and composition 

We were unable to find information on San Juan’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public lighting

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We were unable to confirm if San Juan has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in San Juan.

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

The City of Seattle’s Green Fleet Action Plan requires 50% reduction in greenhouse gas pollution from a 2013 baseline across the municipal fleet by 2025. This action plan prioritizes electric vehicles where possible in addition to biofuels, advanced technology pilots, fleet right-sizing, driver behavior, and anti-idling efforts. Seattle updated the plan in 2019. Additionally, the city is currently reviewing their fleet procurement policies to develop a new Green Fleet Standard. Seattle’s fleet is composed of 5% efficient vehicles, including battery electric vehicles. 

Public Lighting

We did not find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. The City of Seattle was one of the first cities in the nation to embark on a massive city-wide streetlight conversion project that that was part of the DOE LED street lighting consortium project. In 2014 residential conversions were completed and the utility has expanded conversion in other parts of the city including the downtown center. Controls are managed at site and not from a central control center. Fixtures have the ability to extinguish when sufficient daylight is available with photocell sensor. 86% of streetlights in Seattle have been converted to LED.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite renewable energy systems installed by the City of Seattle.

Inclusive procurement

The city has a socially responsible policy for procuring, purchasing, and contracting for all projects, including energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. Seattle City Light, the city's utility, and the Office of Sustainability, have plans and goals for utilization of women- and minority-owned businesses.

Last updated: May 2021

Fleet policies and composition 

We were unable to find information on Springfield’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public lighting

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We were unable to confirm if Springfield has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Springfield.

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

St. Louis does not have fuel efficiency requirements for the public fleet. Executive Order 68 requires the city to prioritize the purchase of low and no emission vehicles over comparable internal combustion engine vehicles. The City has a no-idling ordinance (Ordinance 68137) and telematics devices installed in 475 vehicles to improve efficiency and reduce fuel consumption. The city has used VW Trust funding to acquire 8 EVs and several dual port EVSE.We were unable to find data regarding the city’s fleet composition. 

Public Lighting

The city and county’s lighting regulations require lighting controls and call for automatic extinguishing of streetlights when sufficient day light is available.The city and county’s lighting regulations require lighting controls and call for automatic extinguishing of streetlights when sufficient day light is available. St. Louis has converted approximately 40-50% of streetlights to LED. 

Onsite or offsite renewable systems 

We were unable to find information indicating that the City has installed onsite or offsite renewable energy systems.

Inclusive procurement 

St. Louis has set carveouts for minority and women-owned businesses. The PACE St. Louis program has M/WBE goals.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition 

St. Petersburg has a Green Fleet Policy and the City’s fleet management department states that the fleet now includes hybrid vehicles. We were unable to find data regarding the fleet composition.

Public Lighting 

St. Petersburg's lighting code sets regulations to conserve energy and minimize light pollution. Working with Duke Energy, the city has upgraded all city-leased streetlights to LEDs.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

St. Petersburg has installed 1.186 MW of on-site solar capacity. The city has also entered into a lease agreement with Duke Energy to install solar panels on the City's pier. 

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to verify if the City has inclusive procurement and contracting processes. St. Petersburg is currently conducting a disparity study. 

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet policies and composition 

We were unable to find information on Stockton’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public lighting

Stockton does not have a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We were unable to confirm if Stockton has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

We were unable to find information regarding onsite and offsite renewable energy systems installed by Stockton.

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet policies and composition 

We were unable to find information on Syracuse’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public lighting 

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. Syracuse is in the process upgrading streetlights to LEDs.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Syracuse.

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

We were unable to find information on procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements for fleet vehicles in Tampa. We were unable to find data on the City's fleet composition.  

Public Lighting

Tampa has not yet adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. A policy in Tampa’s Comprehensive Plan (Policy 40.1.7) calls for Tampa to pursue energy-saving options for exterior lighting of municipal buildings. Nevertheless, there are no formal efficiency focused lighting replacement programs in place in this city.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Tampa

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet policies and composition 

We were unable to find information on Toledo’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public lighting

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. We were unable to confirm if Toledo has an outdoor lighting upgrade program.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Toledo.

Inclusive procurement 

While we were unable to verify that the practices had been applied to energy projects, Toledo's Diversified Contractors Accelerator Program encourages increased minority and women-owned businesses participation in public construction projects.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition 

Tucson's Sustainability Plan and other city policies outline the goals for the purchase and use of newer renewable fuels, as well as highly efficient vehicles and equipment. High efficiency vehicles and alternative fuels are the preferred selections when operationally feasible. Tucson's municipal vehicle fleet is composed of 0.1% efficient vehicles, including hybrid and battery electric. Additionally, the city's public transit fleet includes 11 hybrid vehicles.

Public Lighting

Tucson, with Pima County, passed an Outdoor Lighting Code in 1994, which was updated in 2012 in partnership with the International Dark-Sky Association to reduce light pollution which resulted in conversion of outdoor lights to LEDs and dimming in areas of low foot traffic at night. In 2018, 21,563 streetlights were upgraded to LED.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

Tucson has installed onsite renewable systems on city facilities. Currently, the city has 4.7 MW of solar power installed.

Inclusive procurement

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition 

Tulsa's procurement policy states that all replacement vehicles must have a higher fuel efficiency rating than the vehicle it is replacing. Code of Ordinances Title 12 Internal Policies requires the City to promote energy conservation and implement cost-efficient energy savings in all of its activities and operations. The City's policy objectives include goals for the municipal fleet, including emphasizing fuel economy and reducing the number of fleet vehicles. Tulsa's fleet received recognition as a green fleet in 2020. 

Public Lighting 

Tulsa has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance, but most streetlights automatically turn off in daylight conditions. Tulsa's streetlights are owned and maintained by the electric utility. Streetlight conversion is in progress, but we were unable to determine the percentage converted to LED. All new and replacement lights will be LEDs throughout the ity.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Tulsa.

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

Virginia Beach does not have formal fuel efficiency requirements for their vehicles or energy-efficient vehicle procurement policies in place. The city has dedicated funding to installing GPS systems in vehicles to optimize fleet use and performance. We were unable to find data on Virginia Beach’s fleet composition. 

Public Lighting

Virginia Beach's Design Standards require LED lights to be used. All city-owned streetlights have been converted to LED and Dominion Energy streetlights are in the process of being upgraded.

Onsite renewable systems 

Virginia Beach has installed 2.2 MW of solar capacity on city facilities.

Inclusive procurement

While we were unable to verify if the policy had been applied to energy projects, the City sets goals for minority-owned, women-owned, and disabled veteran-owned business utilization in contracts.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition

The Department of Public Works' procurement policy is to require all new sedans be all-electric or PHEV. For other vehicle types, the District has standardized the vehicle makes and models for alternative fuels and requires the most fuel efficiency standards for other ICE engines. The Department of Energy & Environment is leading the development of a Transportation Electrification Roadmap, to meet the goals outlined in the Clean Energy DC Omnibus Act. The Fleet Management Administration recently launched a multi-year effort to install 20 dual-port charging stations to support electrification of the fleet. The District’s Clean Energy DC Omnibus Act (section 502) requires all public buses to be zero-emission vehicles by 2045. Furthermore, it requires the District’s Department of Transportation to submit a plan for achieving 100% replacement of public buses, including school buses, with electric buses upon the end of their useful life, by calendar year 2021. Washington’s fleet is composed of 1% efficient vehicles, including hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles. 

Public Lighting

Washington has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. The District is launching a Streetlight Upgrade and Modernization Project which proposes to convert the street light network of more than 75,000 assets to light-emitting diode (LED) technology with remote monitoring and control capabilities. In addition to conversion, poles will be brought up to a “state of good repair,” meaning that arms, bases, and poles that are in disrepair (i.e., chipped paint, leaning, or broken) will be repaired to and maintained at fair condition. The proposed improvements would occur primarily within the existing right-of-way. The District of Columbia Office of Public-Private Partnerships (OP3) is providing procurement support as the selected bidder is expected to use private financing to develop the project. To date, approximately 11% of public lighting has been upgraded to LEDs

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

DC has installed onsite renewable systems on municipal facilities. The current total installed capacity is 13 MW.

Inclusive procurement

The District has contracting and procurement policies that require spending benefit local, small, and minority businsses. District agencies are required to spend at least 50% of expendable budgets with such businesses, although these do not specifically give preference to minority-owned or women-owned businesses.

Last updated: May 2021

Fleet procurement and composition

We were unable to find information on Wichita’s fleet procurement policies or fuel efficiency requirements. We were unable to find data regarding fleet composition.

Public lighting 

We did not find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. There are currently over 28,400 lights currently occupying public street right-of-way. Evergy, the local utility, owns and maintains approximately 92%, while the City owns and maintains the remaining 8%. In collaboration with Evergy, 100% of streetlights have been converted to LED.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Wichita.

Inclusive procurement

The city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes through its Emerging & Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Program which were applied to a recent renewable energy contract.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet policies and composition 

Winston-Salem does not have a formal fleet procurement policy for efficient vehicles. Winston-Salem’s municipal fleet is currently made up of 0.18% efficient vehicles, including hybrid and battery electric vehicles. 

Public lighting 

We were unable to find information regarding the adoption of a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance. All of the city-owned streetlights have been converted to LED, and Duke Energy is upgrading their portion of streetlights.

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

We were unable to find information regarding onsite or offsite renewable energy systems in Winston-Salem.

Inclusive procurement 

Although the city hasn't undertaken recent energy projects, Winston-Salem has a minority-owned and women-owned business enterprise certification program through its Business Inclusion and Advancement Department.

Last updated: June 2021

Fleet Policies and Composition 

As part of its Green Community designation commitment, the City committed (via an internal Policy document, signed in 2010) to purchasing fuel-efficient vehicles for municipal use whenever such vehicles are commercially available and practicable. We were unable to find data on Worcester’s fleet composition. 

Public Lighting

Worcester has not adopted a policy requiring efficient outdoor lighting, such as the International Dark-Sky Association’s Model Lighting Ordinance, but the City has followed some provisions and best management practices. The City replaced lights it its public garages, parks and parking lots, and all of its streetlights (13,419) with LEDs. The latter are down-facing fixtures causing less light spill than the replaced high-pressure sodium and metal halide light fixtures. All lighting uses a program-based astrological clock to turn lights on and off within 30 minutes of dusk and dawn. Additionally, lights have photocells to turn the lights on in the event that darkness carries past astrological clock dusk and dawn times in order to maintain appropriate light levels. 

Onsite and offsite renewable systems 

Worcester has installed onsite renewables on city facilities. The current total installed capacity is 10.5 MW. The city has completed preliminary engineering efforts for additional solar arrays. 

Inclusive procurement 

We were unable to verify if the city has inclusive procurement and contracting processes.

Last updated: June 2021