State and Local Policy Database

St. Petersburg

City Scorecard Rank

39

St. Petersburg, FL

28.50Scored out of 100Updated 8/2019
Local Government Score:
3.5 out of 9 points
Local Government Climate and Energy Goals List All

The City of St. Petersburg has not adopted a municipal climate or sustainability action plan.

Climate Mitigation Goal

The city set a goal to reduce local government greenhouse gas emissions 20% by 2020, using a 2016 baseline. ACEEE does not project the city will achieve its GHG emissions reduction goal for municipal operations because no data was available to make a projection. 

Energy Reduction Goal

St. Petersburg has a goal to use renewable energy to power 100% of city operations by 2035.

Renewable Energy Goal

We did not find information regarding a municipal renewable energy goal.

Last updated: March 2019

Procurement and Construction List All

Fleet Policies and Composition 

We could not find information on a procurement policy in St. Petersburg but, the City’s fleet management department states that the fleet now includes hybrid vehicles. We were unable to find data regarding the fleet composition.

Public Lighting 

St. Petersburg's lighting code sets regulations to conserve energy and minimize light pollution. We did not find information on outdoor lighting upgrade programs, however the city has been dedicated to transitioning from incandescent outdoor lighting to LED lighting for street lights.

Green Building Requirements

St. Petersburg requires all city-owned and occupied buildings over 10,000 square feet to meet minimum USGBC LEED requirements.

Last updated: June 2019

Asset Management List All

Building Benchmarking and Retrofitting 

We were unable to find information regarding St. Petersburg’s benchmarking practices. Funding was approved by Mayor and City Council in 2016 for energy efficiency retrofits, with projects underway in 2018. According to Sustainability & Resiliency website, a partnership with USF Clean Energy Research Center was created to conduct initial energy efficiency and retrofit analysis to result in immediate retrofit projects.

Public Workfoce Commuting

St. Petersburg allows telework options for all employees. 

Last updated: March 2019

Community-Wide Initiatives
Score: 8.5 out of 16 points
Community-Wide Summary List All

The City of St. Petersburg adopted the Integrated Sustainability Action Plan (ISAP) in April 2019.

Last updated: June 2019

Community-Wide Climate Mitigation and Energy GoalsList All

Climate Mitigation Goal

The ISAP includes a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 80% by 2050, with an interim goal to reduce emissions 20% by 2020. ACEEE does not project the city will achieve its community-wide GHG emissions reduction goal because no data was available to make a projection. 

Energy Reduction Goal

We did not find information regarding a community-wide energy reduction goal for the city.

Renewable Energy Goal

St. Petersburg has adopted a goal to use 100% renewable electricity.

Energy Data Reporting

The city’s 2016 greenhouse gas inventory includes energy data for private buildings, public buildings, and the transportation sector.

Last updated: June 2019

Equity-Driven Approaches to Clean Energy Planning, Implementation, and EvaluationList All

Equity-Driven Community Engagement

We were unable to determine whether permanent city staff have taken a unique and expanded approach in conducting outreach for multiple clean energy initiatives to marginalized groups compared with outreach to other city constituencies.

Equity-Driven Decision-Making

We were unable to determine if the city has created a formal role for marginalized community residents or local organizations representing those communities to participate in decision-making that affects the creation or implementation of a local energy, sustainability, or climate action plan.

Accountability to Equity

We were unable to determine whether the city has adopted specific goals, metrics, or protocols to track how multiple energy, sustainability, or climate action initiatives are affecting local marginalized groups. 

Last updated: June 2019

Clean Distributed Energy SystemsList All

St. Petersburg approved of a biosolids and waste to energy project that includes the use of combined heat and power.

The city also entered into an agreement with Duke Energy for the installation of on-site solar panels on the St. Pete Pier. The city also has a policy to install solar panels on parks department facilities.

Last updated: June 2019

Mitigation of Urban Heat Islands List All

The ISAP includes goals to achieve no net loss of wetlands, streams or shoreline buffers; maintain natural resource acreage at 20 acres per 1,000 residents or 11.5% of total land area; ensure 85% of the city’s population lives within 1/3-mile of green infrastructure.

St. Petersburg has adopted a private tree protection ordinance.

The city also banned any alterations of wetlands, excluding restoration projects. The city requires developments that destroy wetlands to create a new wetland that is at least twice the size of the previous wetland. 

Last updated: June 2019

Buildings Policies
Score: 6 out of 30 points
Buildings Summary List All

The City of St. Petersburg enforces the state’s building energy codes. The city offers several incentives for energy efficiency projects. We could not find information on city mandated benchmarking policies or above-code energy action requirements.

Last Update: March 2019

Building Energy Code AdoptionList All

State of Florida law requires that residential and commercial buildings comply with the 6th Edition Florida Building Code, Energy Conservation. The 6th Edition Florida Building Code, Energy Conservation is based on the 2015 IECC with amendments. The state bars cities from adoption codes more stringent than the state codes. To learn more about Florida’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction must comply with the Florida Building Code. The city’s zEPI score for their commercial energy code is 53.4.

Residential

Residential construction must comply with the Florida Building Code. The city’s zEPI score for their residential energy code is 60.7.

Solar- and EV-ready

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted solar- and/or EV-ready ordinances.

Last Update: March 2019

Building Energy Code Enforcement and ComplianceList All

St. Petersburg requires plan reviews for residential and commercial projects. Developers must perform blower door tests on residential projects. We could not find information on the number of full time employees the city staffs to enforce the energy code. We could not find information regarding upfront support for code compliance.

Last Update: March 2019

Benchmarking, Rating, & Transparency List All

Commercial and multifamily

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for commercial and multifamily buildings.

Single-family    

We could not find information on whether the city has adopted a mandatory benchmarking and disclosure policy for single-family home.

Last Update: March 2019

Incentives and Financing for Efficient Buildings and Renewable EnergyList All

St. Petersburg offers four incentives for energy efficiency projects.

Commercial and residential construction permit applications are eligible for partial refund of permit fees if the building receives a green building certification. Residential buildings must meet all requirements of the Green Home Designation Standard of the Florida Green Building Coalition to receive a $300.00 refund. Commercial buildings but meet all requirements of USGBC LEED standard to receive a $1,000 refund. The city has also partnered with Duke Energy who offers free home energy checks and rebates for residents.

Please note that each incentive/program is tallied based on the building types and energy resources eligible for award. For example, a PACE financing program that offers energy efficiency and renewable energy financing to both residential and commercial property owners is counted as four incentives.

Last Update: March 2019

Required Energy ActionsList All

We could not find information on whether the city requires building owners to conduct additional above-code energy actions.

Last Update: March 2019

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Workforce DevelopmentList All

We could not verify if the city has programs committed to developing a dedicated energy efficiency and/or renewable energy workforce.

Last Update: March 2019

Energy & Water Utilities
Score: 2.5 out of 15 points
Energy & Water Utilities Summary List All

Duke Energy Florida, an investor-owned utility (IOU), is the primary electric utility for the City of St. Petersburg. The primary natural gas supplier for St. Petersburg is TECO Peoples Gas, an IOU. The State of Florida requires its utilities which post sales of 2,000 GWh or more to implement cost-effective energy efficiency programs and to conduct energy efficiency potential studies. Natural gas programs are required by orders and legislation. To learn more about the state-requirements for electric and gas efficiency, please visit the Florida page of the State Database.

The St. Petersburg Water Resources Department is the municipal utility that provides the City of St. Petersburg with drinking water services, wastewater treatment, and stormwater management.

Last Updated: March 2019

Electric & Gas Energy Efficiency Programs and SavingsList All

In 2017, Duke Energy Florida reported 66,081 MWh of net electric savings at the meter, which represents 0.17% of its retail sales. In 2017, TECO Peoples Gas reported no net natural gas savings. These savings figures cover both utilities’ entire service jurisdiction, not just St. Petersburg. Duke Energy Florida offers electric efficiency incentives and technical assistance to residential and business customers. TECO Peoples Gas similarly offers natural gas efficiency programs to residential and business customers.

At this time, the City of St. Petersburg does not have a formal partnership with Duke Energy Florida or TECO Peoples Gas in the form of a jointly-developed or administered energy saving strategy, plan, or agreement.

Last Updated: March 2019

Low-Income & Multifamily EE Programs List All

Low-Income Programs

Duke Energy Florida offers the Neighborhood Energy Saver program. Through this program the utility identifies neighborhoods who meet the income eligibility requirements and installs energy efficiency measures directly in homes. These measures include LED light bulbs, insulation, duct repair, faucet aerators, low flow showerheads, weatherstripping, and HVAC tune-ups.  The utility also partners on the Low Income Weatherization Assistance Program with weatherization agencies and other organizations like Habitat for Humanity to install energy efficiency measures in homes of customers who meet income eligibility requirements.

In 2017, according to Duke Energy Florida, it achieved 8,777 MWh energy savings from its low-income programs while serving 4,643 low-income households.

At this time, TECO Peoples Gas does not provide energy efficiency programs targeted at low-income customers.

Multifamily Programs

Duke Energy Florida offers the Home Energy Check Multifamily Audit program and the Residential Incentive Program. The Incentive Program includes ceiling insulation, heat pumps, and duct repair. In 2017, according to Duke Energy Florida, it achieved 395 MWh energy savings from its multifamily programs while serving 2,126 low-income customers.

At this time, TECO Peoples Gas does not provide programs targeted at multifamily properties.

Last Updated: March 2019

Provision of Energy Data by UtilitiesList All

Neither TECO Peoples Gas nor Duke Energy Florida provides building managers with automated benchmarking data through ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager. The City of St. Petersburg does not advocate for better access to utility data for ratepayers or the establishment of data-sharing agreements between the city and its utilities.

Last Updated: March 2019

Renewable Energy Efforts of Energy UtilitiesList All

Renewable Energy Incentives

In 2017, Duke Energy Florida did not provide renewable energy incentives for the construction of new distributed solar or wind systems.

City-Led Efforts to Decarbonize the Electric Grid

St. Petersburg's Clean Energy Roadmap emphasizes Duke Energy Florida's needed role in transitioning towards renewable energy resources, including state and utility-specific recommendations to help them transition to clean energy production.

Last Updated: April 2019

Efficiency Efforts in Water ServicesList All

City-wide water efficiency and goals

The energy and water utilities do not offer joint energy and water efficiency programs. At this point, the City of St. Petersburg has not established a water savings target or goal. However, it does offer some suggestions for conserving water and offers a water saving program.

Water plant efficiency and self-generation

St. Petersburg Water Resources Department has not set specific energy efficiency targets or strategies. However, it is part of the Better Buildings Initiative. The city’s water system does not self-generate its own energy.

Last Updated: May 2019

Transportation
Score: 8 out of 30 points
Sustainable Transportation Planning List All

Sustainable Transportation Plan

St. Petersburg's Comprehensive Plan, last updated in 2016, includes strategies to reduce GHG emissions from transportation.

VMT/GHG Targets and Stringency

St. Petersburg does not have a VMT/GHG target in place for the transportation sector.

Progress Achieved Toward VMT/GHG Targets

St. Petersburg does not track progress towards a VMT/GHG target.

Last Updated: March 2019

Location Efficiency List All

Location Efficient Zoning Codes

St. Petersburg zoning code promotes the creation of mixed use development throughout the city.

Residential Parking Policies

The city’s parking code requires 1 space for units with up to 2 bedrooms; plus 0.5 for each additional bedroom.

Location Efficiency Incentives and Disclosure

We could not confirm if St. Petersburg has location efficiency incentives or disclosure requirements.

Last Updated: March 2019

Mode Shift List All

Mode Shift Targets

The city’s modal share targets specify a maximum for drive alone travel of 60%, a minimum of 25% for bike,  walk, and Transit minimum: 25%.

Progress Achieved Toward Mode Shift Targets

St. Petersburg does not track progress towards their mode shift target.

Complete Streets

St. Petersburg’s complete streets policy scored an 80.0 out of 100 according to the National Complete Streets Coalition.

Car Sharing

We could not confirm if St. Petersburg has a parking policy in place for car sharing vehicles.

Bike Sharing

The city has 113.96 docked bike share bikes per 100,000 people.

Last Updated: May 2019

Transit List All

Transportation Funding

St. Petersburg spends an average of $10.22 per capita on transit.

Access to Transit Services

The city has an All Transit Performance score of 4.9 out of 10.

Last Updated: March 2019

Efficient VehiclesList All

Vehicle Purchase Incentives

We could not confirm if St. Petersburg offers incentives for citizens to purchase hybrid, plug-in, or EV vehicles.

Vehicle Infrastructure Incentives

We could not confirm if St. Petersburg offers incentives for the installing of EV charging infrastructure.

EV Charging Locations

St. Petersburg has 12.16 publicly available EV charging locations per 100,000 people.

Renewable Charging Incentives

We could not confirm if St Petersburg has any incentives for renewable EV charging infrastructure installation.

Last Updated: March 2019

Freight System EfficiencyList All

St. Petersburg does not have a sustainable freight transportation plan in place nor does it have any policies that address freight efficiency.

Last Updated: March 2019

Clean, Efficient Transportation for Low-Income CommunitiesList All

Affordable New TOD Housing Policy

St. Petersburg does not have any requirements or incentives in place to encourage the development or preservation of affordable housing in transit-served areas.

Connecting Existing Affordable Housing Stock to Efficient Transportation Options

St. Petersburg does not provide any subsidies for efficient transportation options to low-income residents.

Low-Income Access to High Quality Transit

0% of low-income households (those that earn less than $50k annually) are located near high-quality, all-day transit in St. Petersburg.     

Last Updated: March 2019