State and Local Policy Database

Energy Code Stringency

Mandatory building energy codes are a foundational mechanism for improving the efficiency of new buildings and buildings undergoing significant remodeling. National model codes are adopted by at the state or local level through legislative or regulatory action. Some states may set the building code standard for all of the local jurisdictions within the state, while, in other “home rule” states, municipalities are able to adopt their own building codes. Some states encourage adoption of more stringent building codes or alternative compliance paths by local jurisdictions. This sub-category includes city-specific information on the two major building energy codes:

  • Commercial The commercial energy code authority available to the local jurisdiction under state law; the jurisdiction’s use its available authority; the commercial building code in place in the jurisdiction and its IECC/ASHRAE edition equivalency; commercial energy code-related advocacy by the jurisdiction at the state-level.
  • Residential – The residential energy code authority available to the local jurisdiction under state law; the jurisdiction’s use its available authority; the residential building code in place in the jurisdiction and its IECC edition equivalency; residential energy code-related advocacy by the jurisdiction at the state-level.

The State of Virginia requires its local jurisdictions to follow the 2012 Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code (USBC) for residential and commercial construction. As of July 14, 2014, the USBC was updated to reference the 2012 IECC and 2012 IRC. Residential buildings must comply with the 2012 IRC, while commercial buildings must comply with 2012 IECC standards with reference to ASHRAE 90.1-2010. To learn more, please see the Virginia page of the State Policy Database.  

Commercial

Commercial construction in Arlington County complies with the Virginia USBC. Arlington's Chief Code Official serves as Vice Chair of the IECC Commercial Committee and advocates for more stringent commercial building energy codes.

Residential

Residential construction in Arlington County complies with the Virginia USBC. Arlington works with site plan multifamily projects to voluntarily build beyond code.

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of Georgia is a home rule state in which jurisdictions may set their own building energy codes. The state has made two optional building codes available to any jurisdiction to adopt, the 2011 Georgia State Minimum Standard Energy Code and the 2011 Georgia State Minimum Residential Green Building Standard. The residential section of this code is based on the 2009 IECC, and the commercial section is based on ASHRAE 90.1-2007. To learn more about the Georgia building codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Although local authority is permitted, Atlanta has not made any amendments to the state building codes with respect to commercial buildings.

Residential

Although local authority is permitted, Atlanta has not made any amendments to the state building codes with respect to residential buildings.

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of Texas allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes more stringent than the Texas Building Energy Code. The minimum state standard for single-family residential construction must comply with the 2015 International Residential Code (IRC). All other residential and commercial building construction must comply with the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). State-funded building construction must comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2013. To learn more about the building energy code requirements for the State of Texas, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

In February 2007, the city council passed the Austin Climate Protection Plan, calling for the drafting of new building codes consistent with reducing energy use in all new buildings by 75%.  The 2015 City of Austin Energy Code is based on the 2015 IECC with amendments according to program targets. It took effect in September 2016. The city council adopted Resolution 20081106-048 in November 2008 setting a series of energy efficiency improvement goals for the city's existing residential and commercial buildings.

Residential

In February 2007, the city council passed the Austin Climate Protection Plan, calling for the drafting of new building codes consistent with reducing energy used in single-family homes by 65% by 2015. The 2015 Austin Energy Code is based on the 2015 IECC with amendments according to program targets. It took effect in September 2016.

Last Updated: February 2017

The State of Maryland is a home rule state and allows local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes that are more stringent than the minimum state requirements, or to suit their local conditions. Maryland requires that at a minimum, residential and commercial construction must comply with the 2015 Maryland Building Performance Standards, which are equally as stringent as the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). To learn more about the required building codes for the State of Maryland, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

In Maryland, local authority to adopt and amend codes is permitted. Baltimore has adopted the 2015 Maryland Building Performance Standards for commercial construction into the Baltimore County Building Code with local amendments.

Residential

Baltimore has adopted the 2015 Maryland Building Performance Standards for residential construction into the Baltimore County Building Code with local amendments.

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of Alabama allows local jurisdictions to adopt more stringent codes than the state mandated energy codes. The 2015 Alabama Residential Energy Code references to the 2015 IECC, however, state-specific amendments weaken it significantly. The 2015 Alabama Commercial Energy Code is based ASHRAE 90.1-2013. To learn more about the building energy codes in Alabama, please view the State Policy Database

Commercial

Although local authority is permitted, no stretch code has been adopted. Birmingham has adopted the Alabama Commercial Energy Code, effective January 1, 2016.

Residential

Although local authority is permitted, no stretch code has been adopted. Birmingham has adopted the Alabama Residential Energy Code, effective October 1, 2016.

Last Updated: January 2017

The Massachusetts law requires statewide adoption of each new International Energy Conservation Code edition within one year of its publication. Massachusetts has adopted the 2015 IECC for commercial and residential buildings. Massachusetts also allows its local jurisdictions to upgrade their energy codes with a state-determined stretch code. To learn more about state policies regarding building energy codes in Massachusetts, visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Boston has adopted the Massachusetts Stretch Energy code, which requires new buildings to exceed the base energy code by 20%. The City advocates at the state-level for more stringent codes.

Residential

Boston has adopted the Massachusetts Stretch Energy code, which requires new buildings to exceed the base energy code by 20%. The City advocates at the state-level for more stringent codes.

Last updated: January 2017

The State of Colorado is a home rule state meaning local jurisdictions may set their own building codes for both residential and commercial construction. Localities which choose to set a building code must comply with the 2003 IECC at a minimum. To learn more about the building energy codes for the State of Colorado, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

The City of Boulder has established the IECC 2012/ASHRAE 90.1-2010 as the required commercial building energy code. The city amended the code to require a 30% increase in performance requirements. At this time, Boulder has not begun to advocate at the state level for increased stringency in building energy codes.

Residential

The City of Boulder has established the 2012 IECC along with the Green Building Green Points Program as the required residential building energy code. At this time, Boulder has not begun to advocate at the state level for increased stringency in building energy codes.

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of Vermont requires local jurisdictions to follow the state-mandated building energy codes. Residential construction must follow the 2015 Residential Building Energy Standards (RBES), which references the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code with amendments. Commercial construction must follow the 2015 Commercial Building Energy Standards (CBES) which references the 2015 IECC with amendments. The CBES also allows an alternative compliance path of ASHRAE 90.1 2013 with Vermont specific amendments. To learn more about Vermont’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial buildings in Burlington comply with the 2015 CBES. The City of Burlington has not yet begun to advocate to the state for increased stringency in commercial building energy codes.

Residential

Residential buildings in Burlington comply with the 2015 RBES. The City of Burlington has not yet begun to advocate to the state for increased stringency in residential building energy codes.

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of North Carolina requires local jurisdictions to comply with the state mandated building energy codes. All buildings must comply with the 2012 North Carolina Energy Conservation Code, which is more stringent than the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and the ASHRAE 90.1-2010. To learn more about the building codes and requirements for the State of North Carolina, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Carrboro complies with the North Carolina Energy Conservation Code. We did not find information regarding Carrboro’s advocacy for increased stringency in commercial building energy codes.

Residential

Residential construction in Carrboro complies with the North Carolina Energy Conservation Code. We did not find information regarding Carrboro’s advocacy for increased stringency in residential building energy codes.

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of North Carolina requires local jurisdictions to comply with the state mandated building energy codes. All buildings must comply with the 2012 North Carolina Energy Conservation Code, which is more stringent than the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and the ASHRAE 90.1-2010. To learn more about the building codes and requirements for the State of North Carolina, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Charlotte complies with the North Carolina Energy Conservation Code. Charlotte has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in commercial building energy codes.

Residential

Residential construction in Charlotte complies with the North Carolina Energy Conservation Code. Charlotte has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in residential building energy codes.

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of Virginia requires its local jurisdictions to follow the 2012 Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code (USBC) for residential and commercial construction. As of July 14, 2014, the USBC was updated to reference the 2012 IECC and 2012 IRC. Residential buildings must comply with the 2012 IRC, while commercial buildings must meet 2012 IECC standards with reference to ASHRAE 90.1-2010. To learn more, please see the Virginia page of the State Policy Database.  

Commercial

Commercial construction in Charlottesville complies with the Virginia USBC.  Charlottesville submitted public comments in support of commercial building energy codes upgrades during the code change rulemaking-process.

Residential

Residential construction in Charlottesville complies with the Virginia USBC. Charlottesville submitted public comments in support of residential building energy codes upgrades during the code change rulemaking-process.

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of Illinois allows local jurisdictions to adopt building codes that are more stringent than the Illinois Energy Conservation Code. The Illinois Energy Conservation Code is as stringent as the 2015 IECC for commercial buildings and 2012 IECC for residential. The Chicago Energy Conservation Code includes a cool roof requirement for commercial buildings. To learn more about building energy codes in Illinois, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Chicago complies with the Illinois Energy Conservation Code as of January 2016. The City of Chicago has added a cool roof requirement in the Energy Conservation Code for commercial buildings making it more stringent than the 2015 IECC.

Residential

Chicago complies with the Illinois Energy Conservation Code as of January 2016. The City of Chicago amended the Energy Conservation Code for residential buildings, making it as stringent as the 2012 IECC.

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of Ohio has set mandatory building energy codes statewide. The Ohio Board of Building Standards adopted the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and ASHRAE 90.1-2010 with amendments for commercial buildings, effective January 1, 2017. Ohio's energy code for residential buildings is based on the 2009 IECC. To learn more about Ohio’s building energy code requirements, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial buildings in Cincinnati comply with the state mandated codes. The city actively monitors state level discussions concerning building codes, advocates for improvements and participates in the 2018 IECC voting process.

Residential

Residential buildings in Cincinnati comply with the state mandated codes. The city actively monitors state level discussions concerning building codes, advocates for improvements and participates in the 2018 IECC voting process.

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of Ohio has set mandatory building energy codes statewide. The Ohio Board of Building Standards adopted the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and ASHRAE 90.1-2010 with amendments for commercial buildings, effective January 1, 2017. Ohio's energy code for residential buildings is based on the 2009 IECC. To learn more about Ohio’s building energy code requirements, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial buildings in Cleveland comply with the state mandated codes. The city has begun advocating at the state level for more stringent commercial building energy codes. Several community organizations and volunteer groups, including Environmental Health Watch and the Green Building Coalition advocate for more stringent building energy codes as well. Cleveland participates in the 2018 IECC voting process.

Residential

Residential buildings in Cleveland comply with the state mandated codes. The city has begun advocating at the state level for more stringent residential building energy codes. Several community organizations and volunteer groups, including Environmental Health Watch and the Green Building Coalition advocate for more stringent building energy codes as well. Cleveland participates in the 2018 IECC voting process.

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of Ohio has set mandatory building energy codes statewide. The Ohio Board of Building Standards adopted the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and ASHRAE 90.1-2010 with amendments for commercial buildings, effective January 1, 2017. Ohio's energy code for residential buildings is based on the 2009 IECC. To learn more about Ohio’s building energy code requirements, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial buildings in Columbus comply with the state mandated codes. The City of Columbus advocates at the state level for increased stringency in the commercial building energy codes and participates in the 2018 IECC voting process.

Residential

Residential buildings in Columbus comply with the state mandated codes. The City of Columbus advocates at the state level for increased stringency in the residential building energy codes and participates in the 2018 IECC voting process.

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of Texas allows its local jurisdictions to adopt and amend the Texas Building Energy Code.  All residential and commercial building construction must comply with the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). State-funded building construction must comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2013. To learn more about the building energy code requirements for the State of Texas, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

The Dallas Energy Conservation Code incorporated the 2015 IECC or ASHRAE 90.1-2013 for commercial buildings effective September 2016. In March 2017, Dallas amended the code to include an alternative compliance path for buildings meeting ENERGY STAR program certification.  

Residential

The Dallas Energy Conservation Code incorporated the 2015 IECC for residential construction effective September 2016. In March 2017, Dallas amended the code to include an alternative compliance path for buildings meeting ENERGY STAR program certification.  

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of Colorado is a home rule state meaning local jurisdictions may set their own building codes, if they choose to, for both residential and commercial construction. Localities which choose to set a building code must comply with the 2003 IECC at a minimum. The 2016 Denver Building Code includes the 2015 IECC with city-specific amendments. Denver participated in the ICC voting process for the 2018 IECC.

To learn more about the building energy codes for the State of Colorado, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Denver has adopted the 2015 IECC with local amendments.

Residential

Denver has adopted the 2015 IECC with local amendments.

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of Michigan requires its local jurisdictions to comply with the 2015 Michigan Energy Code. The Michigan Residential Code is based on the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings. However, the state amended the 2015 IECC, weakening it to 2012 IECC levels.

The State of Michigan currently requires commercial buildings to comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2007 standards. However, the state has begun the process of updating the Michigan Uniform Energy Code, applicable to commercial buildings, to ASHRAE 90.1-2013. The standard is expected to go into effect early 2017. To learn more about Michigan’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Detroit complies with the state mandated energy codes for commercial buildings. Detroit has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in commercial building energy codes.

Residential

Detroit complies with the state mandated energy codes for residential buildings. Detroit has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in residential building energy codes.

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of Iowa has set mandatory building energy codes for its local jurisdictions, but also allows loyalties to adopt stretch-codes that are more stringent than the mandated state codes. All residential construction must at least comply with the 2012 IECC. Commercial construction must at least comply with the 2012 IECC and the ASHRAE90.1-2007. To learn more about Iowa’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database

Commercial

Although local permitting is allowed, Dubuque uses the minimum commercial building energy codes set by the state.

Residential

Although local permitting is allowed, Dubuque uses the minimum commercial building energy codes set by the state.

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of Texas allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes more stringent than the Texas Building Energy Code. The minimum state standard for single-family residential construction must comply with the 2015 International Residential Code (IRC). All other residential and commercial building construction must comply with the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). State-funded building construction must comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2013. To learn more about the building energy code requirements for the State of Texas, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

El Paso's Energy Conservation Code for commercial buildings is based on the 2015 IECC, effective May 2016.

Residential

El Paso's Energy Conservation Code for residential buildings is based on the 2015 IECC, with perfromance testing amendments. The code became effective May 2016.

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of Texas allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes that are at least as stringent as the Texas Building Energy Code. The minimum state standard for single-family residential construction must comply with the 2015 International Residential Code (IRC). All other residential and commercial building construction must comply with the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). State-funded building construction must comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2013. To learn more about the building energy code requirements for the State of Texas, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Fort Worth's Energy Code for commercial buildings is based on the 2015 IECC with amendments. The Code permits ENERGY STAR certification as an alternative complaince option. The code went into effect on January 1, 2017.

Residential

Fort Worth's Energy Code for residential buildings is based on the 2015 IECC with amendments. The Code permits ENERGY STAR certification as an alternative complaince option. The code went into effect on January 1, 2017.

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of Connecticut requires residential and commercial buildings to comply with the Connecticut State Building Code which references the 2012 IECC. To learn more about the required building codes for the State of Connecticut, please visit the State Policy Database

Commercial

Commercial construction in Hartford complies with the Connecticut State Building Code. The city has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in commercial building energy codes.

Residential

Residential construction in Hartford complies with the Connecticut State Building Code. The city has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in residential building energy codes.

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of Texas allows its local jurisdictions to adopt and amend building energy codes that are at least as stringent as the Texas Building Energy Code. The minimum state standard for single-family residential construction must comply with the 2015 International Residential Code (IRC). All other residential and commercial building construction must comply with the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). State-funded building construction must comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2013. To learn more about the building energy code requirements for the State of Texas, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Houston adopted the 2015 IECC for commercial buildings with amendments, effective December 2016. The city also adopted ASHRAE 90.1-2013 with amendments, effective December 2016. 

Residential

Houston adopted the 2015 IECC for residential buildings with amendments, effective October 2016. 

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of Indiana has established mandatory building energy codes for commercial and residential construction. The Indiana Energy Conservation Code, updated in 2011, references the 2009 IRC and 2009 IECC for residential construction. The commercial construction codes are as stringent as the ASHRAE 90.1-2007 standard. Commercial construction must also achieve LEED silver certification. To learn more about the building energy codes for Indiana, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Indianapolis complies with the Indiana Energy Conservation Code. Indianapolis has not yet begun advocating to the state for increased stringency in commercial building energy codes.

Residential

Residential construction in Indianapolis complies with the Indiana Energy Conservation Code. Indianapolis has not yet begun advocating to the state for increased stringency in residential building energy codes.

Last Updated: January 2017

Effective June 30, 2015, Florida law requires that residential and commercial buildings comply with the 5th Edition (2014) Florida Building Code, Energy Conservation. The 5th Edition (2014) Florida Building Code, Energy Conservation based on the 2012 IECC with amendments. The 6th Edition (2017) is on schedule to take effect on December 31, 2017. Cities are not permitted to adopt codes more stringent than the state codes. To learn more about Florida’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Jacksonville complies with the Florida building energy codes. Jacksonville has not yet begun to advocate to the state level for increased stringency in commercial building codes.

Residential

Residential construction in Jacksonville complies with the Florida building energy codes. Jacksonville has not yet begun to advocate to the state level for increased stringency in residential building codes.

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of Missouri is home-ruled and allows local jurisdictions to set their own building codes. The State of Missouri has not adopted statewide energy codes or statewide building codes. To learn more about Missouri’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Kansas City has the authority to set its own building codes. The city council adopted the 2012 IECC with amendments

Residential

Kansas City has the authority to set its own building codes. The city council adopted the 2012 IECC with amendments. 

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of Tennessee is home-ruled and allows local jurisdictions to adopt their own building codes. To learn more about the building energy codes in Tennessee, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

The City of Knoxville has adopted the 2012 IECC for commercial construction.

Residential

The City of Knoxville has adopted the 2012 IECC for residential construction.

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of Nevada is a home rule state and allows local governments to adopt building energy codes for their own jurisdiction. Effective July 2015, the 2012 IECC with state specific amendments for residential buildings and ASHRAE 90.1-2010 for commercial buildings were adopted by the State of Nevada.

Commercial

Las Vegas is located in Clark County; the County is responsible for adopting and enforcing the energy code at the local level. The 2012 IECC is required for commercial construction. Las Vegas has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in commercial building energy codes.

Residential

Las Vegas is located in Clark County; the County is responsible for adopting and enforcing the energy code at the local level. The 2012 IECC is required for residential construction. Las Vegas has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in residential building energy codes.

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of Kansas is a home-ruled state, and there are no statewide building energy codes. No jurisdiction is required to adopt building codes, but they may adopt the applicable 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) standards. To learn more about Kansas’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

The City of Lawrence has adopted the 2015 IECC with amendments for commercial construction, effective July 2016

Residential

The City of Lawrence has adopted the 2015 IECC with amendments for residential construction, effective July 2016

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of California allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes that are more stringent than the mandatory state codes. Title 24 outlines all California building codes. Title 24, Part 6 includes the California Energy Code and the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards (BEES). Title 24, Part 11 includes the California Green Building Code. The California Energy Code, BEES and California Green Building Codes have been updated in 2016 and are effective January 1, 2017. The 2016 codes exceed the 2015 IECC standards and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2013. To learn more about California’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Although local authority is permitted, no stretch code has been adopted. Los Angeles adheres to the 2016 BEES and the 2016 California Green Buildings Code.

Residential

Although local authority is permitted, no stretch code has been adopted. Los Angeles adheres to the 2016 BEES and the 2016 California Green Buildings Code.

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of Kentucky requires its local jurisdictions to follow the 2013 Kentucky Building Code (KBC). The KBC references the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for commercial buildings and the 2009 IECC for residential buildings. To learn more about the required building codes for the State of Kentucky, please visit the State Policy Database

Commercial

Commercial buildings in Louisville must comply with the 2013 KBC. Louisville has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in commercial building energy codes.

Residential

Residential buildings in Louisville must comply with the 2013 KBC. Louisville has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in residential building energy codes.

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of Wisconsin requires local jurisdictions to follow the state building codes. Residential construction must follow the Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code, which references the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Commercial construction must follow the Wisconsin Commercial Building Code, which references the 2009 IECC. To learn more about Wisconsin’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Madison complies with the Wisconsin Commercial Building Code. The City of Madison advocates for more stringent energy codes. The City of Madison’s Building Inspection Unit has a representative that sits on the State Building Code and State Energy Code committees. The City also lobbies through Code Council groups to provide feedback on potential changes.

Residential

Residential construction in Madison complies with the Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code. The City of Madison advocates for more stringent energy codes. The City of Madison, Building Inspection Unit has a representative that sits on the State Building Code and State Energy Code committees. The City also lobbies through Code Council groups to provide feedback on potential changes.

Last Updated: January 2017

Tennessee is a home rule state, in which codes are adopted and enforced at the jurisdictional level. To learn more about the building energy codes in Tennessee, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

The City of Memphis adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for new commercial construction in 2012.

Residential

The City of Memphis adopted the 2009 IECC for new residential construction in 2012.

Last Updated: January 2017

Effective June 30, 2015, Florida law requires that residential and commercial buildings comply with the 5th Edition (2014) Florida Building Code, Energy Conservation. The 5th Edition (2014) Florida Building Code, Energy Conservation based on the 2012 IECC with amendments. The 6th Edition (2017) is on schedule to take effect on December 31, 2017. Cities are not permitted to adopt codes more stringent than the state codes. To learn more about Florida’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Miami complies with the Florida building energy codes. Miami has not yet begun to advocate to the state level for increased stringency in commercial building codes.

Residential

Residential construction in Miami complies with the Florida building energy codes. Miami has not yet begun to advocate to the state level for increased stringency in residential building codes.

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of Wisconsin requires local jurisdictions to follow the state building codes. Residential construction must follow the Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code. The Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code incorporates the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Commercial construction must follow the Wisconsin Commercial Building Code, which is based on the 2009 IECC. To learn more about Wisconsin’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Milwaukee complies with the Wisconsin Commercial Building Code. The City of Milwaukee advocates for more stringent energy codes and against efforts to weaken local energy efficiency codes. 

Residential

Residential construction in Milwaukee complies with the Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code. The City of Milwaukee advocates for more stringent energy codes and against efforts to weaken local energy efficiency codes. 

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of Minnesota currently requires local jurisdictions to comply with the 2015 Minnesota Energy Code. The 2015 Minnesota Energy code is based on the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for both residential and commercial codes. To learn more about the Minnesota building energy code requirements, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Minneapolis adopted the 2015 Minnesota Energy Code effective June 2015. Minneapolis does not have the authority to set building energy codes, but is actively lobbying the state Department of Commerce to increase the stringency of the building energy codes.

Residential

Minneapolis has adopted the 2015 Minnesota Energy Code. Minneapolis does not have the authority to set building energy codes, but is actively lobbying the state Department of Commerce to increase the stringency of the building energy codes. 

Last Updated: January 2017

Tennessee is a home rule state, in which codes are adopted and enforced at the jurisdictional level. To learn more about the building energy codes in Tennessee, please visit the State Policy Database.

 Commercial

The City of Nashville adopted the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for commercial buildings, effective August 2016.  

Residential

The City of Nashville adopted the 2012 IECC for residential buildings, effective August 2016.  

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of Louisiana is a home rule state and allows local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes which are more stringent than the minimum state requirements, or to suit their local conditions. At this time, the minimum state standard requires residential buildings to comply with the 2009 IRC with reference to the 2009 IECC. Commercial buildings must comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2007.

Commercial

Although local authority is permitted, New Orleans has not adopted amendments or stretch codes regarding commercial buildings.

Residential

Although local authority is permitted, New Orleans has not adopted amendments or stretch codes regarding residential buildings.

Last Updated: February 2017

The State of New York allows local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes that are more stringent than the minimum state standards. The 2016 Energy Conservation Construction Code of New York (2016 ECCCNYS) is the minimum mandatory code for residential and commercial buildings. ECCCNYS 2016 is as stringent as the 2015 IECC for residential buildings and ASHRAE 90.1-2013 for commercial buildings. To learn more about the building energy codes required in the State of New York, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

New York city has adopted the 2016 New York City Energy Conservation Code (NYCECC) which is based on the 2016 New York State energy code with strengthening amendments. The 2016 NYCECC is more stringent than the ASHRAE 90.1-2013 and went into effect in October 2016. New York City advocates for more stringent building codes at the state level through the NYC Green Codes Task Force, which recommends specific amendments to the state code.

Residential

Residential construction must comply to the 2016 NYCECC, which is more stringent than the 2015 IECC. New York City advocates for more stringent building codes at the state level through the NYC Green Codes Task Force, which recommends specific amendments to the state code.

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of California allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes more stringent than the mandatory state codes. Title 24 outlines all California building codes. Title 24, Part 6 includes the California Energy Code and the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards (BEES). Title 24, Part 11 includes the California Green Building Code. The California Energy Code, BEES and California Green Building Codes have been updated in 2016 and are effective January 1, 2017. The 2016 codes exceed the 2015 IECC standards and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2013. To learn more about California’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Although local authority is permitted, no stretch code has been adopted. Oakland adheres to the 2016 California codes.

Residential

Although local authority is permitted, no stretch code has been adopted. Oakland adheres to the 2016 California codes.

Updated: March 2017

The State of Oklahoma allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes other than the state standards. Oklahoma adopted the 2015 International Residential Code (IRC) with amendments that require cities to comply with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Oklahoma adopted the 2015 International Building Code with amendments that require cities to comply with the 2006 IECC. To learn more, please visit the Oklahoma page on the State Policy Database

Commercial

Oklahoma city complies with the 2006 IECC for commercial buildings.

Residential

Oklahoma city complies with the 2009 IECC for residential buildings.

Last Updated: January 2017

Effective June 30, 2015, Florida law requires that residential and commercial buildings comply with the 5th Edition (2014) Florida Building Code, Energy Conservation. The 5th Edition (2014) Florida Building Code, Energy Conservation based on the 2012 IECC with amendments. The 6th Edition (2017) is on schedule to take effect on December 31, 2017. Cities are not permitted to adopt codes more stringent than the state codes. To learn more about Florida’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Orlando complies with the Florida building energy codes. Orlando has not yet begun to advocate to the state level for increased stringency in commercial building codes.

Residential

Residential construction in Orlando complies with the Florida building energy codes. Orlando has not yet begun to advocate to the state level for increased stringency in residential building codes.

Last Updated: January 2017

Utah’s Uniform Building Code (UUBC) for residential and commercial building energy codes is mandatory statewide. The UUBC is based on the 2015 IECC with weakening amendments. While localities may adopt stretch codes, it is a difficult process to do so. To learn more about Utah’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database

Commercial

Park City adopted the UUBC. The city does not currently advocate for more stringent standards at the state level. 

Residential

Park City adopted the UUBC. The city does not currently advocate for more stringent standards at the state level. 

Last Updated: January 2017

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania requires its local jurisdictions to comply with state-mandated building energy codes. Residential construction must comply with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), although several residential provisions from the 2015 IECC have been adopted by the state as of January 1, 2016. Commercial construction must comply with the 2009 IECC and ASHRAE 90.1-2007. To learn more about the required building energy codes for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Philadelphia complies with the state mandated codes. A representative of Philadelphia, City Councilperson Bobby Henon, serves on the advisory committee responsible for statewide building codes. Henon has subsequently introduced a resolution into City Council calling for the state to allow the City to adopt its own building code, and several city agencies are currently working on a strategy to adopt more stringent codes. The City of Philadelphia also continues to vote on triennial updates to the IECC to prioritize energy efficiency.

Residential

Residential construction in Philadelphia complies with the state mandated codes. A representative of Philadelphia, City Councilperson Bobby Henon, serves on the advisory committee responsible for statewide building codes. Henon has subsequently introduced a resolution into City Council calling for the state to allow the City to adopt its own building code, and several city agencies are currently working on a strategy to adopt more stringent codes. The City of Philadelphia also continues to vote on triennial updates to the IECC to prioritize energy efficiency.

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of Arizona is a home rule state which allows local jurisdictions to set their own building energy codes. The city of Phoenix participated in the ICC voting process for the 2018 IECC.

To learn more about the requirements for building energy codes for the State of Arizona, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

The City of Phoenix adopted the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for commercial construction.

Residential

The City of Phoenix adopted the 2012 IECC for residential construction. The City amended the code to require a minimum HERS of 64 for single family home construction using the performance path.

Last Updated: March 2017

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania requires its local jurisdictions to comply with state-mandated building energy codes. Residential construction must comply with the 2009 IECC, although several residential provisions from the 2015 IECC were adopted by the state January 1, 2016. Commercial construction must comply with the 2009 IECC and ASHRAE 90.1-2007. To learn more about the required building energy codes for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Pittsburgh complies with the state mandated codes. Pittsburgh has developed a working group with the assistance of Green Building Alliance to improve city Codes for Pittsburgh and are working with partner cities to try to improve energy codes statewide. 

Residential

Residential construction in Pittsburgh complies with the state mandated codes. Pittsburgh has developed a working group with the assistance of Green Building Alliance to improve city Codes for Pittsburgh and are working with partner cities to try to improve energy codes statewide. 

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of Oregon requires its local jurisdictions to follow the 2014 Oregon Energy Efficiency Specialty Code for residential and commercial construction. The 2014 Oregon Energy Efficiency Specialty Code is more stringent than the 2009 IECC for residential buildings and is more stringent than the ASHRAE 90.1-2010 for commercial buildings. To learn more about the building energy codes for the State of Oregon, please visit the State Policy Database

Commercial

Portland has adopted the 2014 Oregon Energy Efficiency Specialty Code. Portland incentivizes construction above code, but may not require above code construction, due to state law. Portland actively advocates at the state level for increased building codes by routinely participating in the code revision process, including the reach code.

Residential

Portland has adopted the 2014 Oregon Energy Efficiency Specialty Code. Portland incentivizes construction above code, but may not require above code construction, due to state law. Portland actively advocates at the state level for increased building codes by routinely participating in the code revision process, including the reach code.

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of Rhode Island requires its local jurisdictions to follow the revised edition of the SBC-8 State Energy Conservation Code, SBC-8-2013 in residential and commercial construction. The code requires residential and commercial construction to comply with the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code. To learn more about Rhode Island’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Providence complies with the State Energy Conservation Code. Providence has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in commercial building energy codes.

Residential

Residential construction in Providence complies with the State Energy Conservation Code. Providence has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in residential building energy codes.

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of North Carolina requires local jurisdictions to comply with the state mandated building energy codes. All buildings must comply with the 2012 North Carolina Energy Conservation Code, which is more stringent than the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and the ASHRAE 90.1-2010. To learn more about the building codes and requirements for the State of North Carolina, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Commercial construction in Raleigh complies with the North Carolina Codes. Raleigh has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in commercial building energy codes.

Residential

Residential construction in Raleigh complies with the North Carolina Codes. Raleigh has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in residential building energy codes.

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of Virginia requires its local jurisdictions to follow the 2012 Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code (USBC) for residential and commercial construction. As of July 14, 2014, the USBC was updated to reference the 2012 IECC and 2012 IRC. Residential buildings must comply with the 2012 IRC, while commercial buildings must meet 2012 IECC standards with reference to ASHRAE 90.1-2010. To learn more, please see the Virginia page of the State Policy Database.  

Commercial

Commercial construction in Richmond complies with the 2012 Virginia USBC. The city is a member of the Virginia Energy Efficiency Council (VAEEC) which advocates for higher energy standards.

Residential

Residential construction in Richmond complies with the 2012 Virginia USBC. The city is a member of the Virginia Energy Efficiency Council (VAEEC) which advocates for higher energy standards.

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of California allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes more stringent than the mandatory state codes. Title 24 outlines all California building codes. Title 24, Part 6 includes the California Energy Code and the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards (BEES). Title 24, Part 11 includes the California Green Building Code. The California Energy Code, BEES and California Green Building Codes have been updated in 2016 and are effective January 1, 2017. The 2016 codes exceed the 2015 IECC standards and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2013. To learn more about California’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Although local authority is permitted, no stretch code has been adopted. Riverside adheres to the 2016 California codes.

Residential

Although local authority is permitted, no stretch code has been adopted. Riverside adheres to the 2016 California codes.

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of California allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes more stringent than the mandatory state codes. Title 24 outlines all California building codes. Title 24, Part 6 includes the California Energy Code and the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards (BEES). Title 24, Part 11 includes the California Green Building Code. The California Energy Code, BEES and California Green Building Codes have been updated in 2016 and are effective January 1, 2017. The 2016 codes exceed the 2015 IECC standards and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2013. To learn more about California’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Although local authority is permitted, no stretch code has been adopted. Sacramento adheres to the 2016 California codes.

Residential

Although local authority is permitted, no stretch code has been adopted. Sacramento adheres to the 2016 California codes.

Last Updated: March 2017

Utah’s Uniform Building Code (UUBC) for residential and commercial building energy codes is mandatory statewide. The UUBC is based on the 2015 IECC with weakening amendments. While localities may adopt stretch codes, it is a difficult process to do so. Salt Lake City participated in the ICC voting process for the 2018 IECC.

To learn more about Utah’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database

Commercial

Commercial construction in Salt Lake City complies with the Utah Codes. Salt Lake City actively lobbies the state to increase the stringency of building energy codes. Most recently, the mayor advocated for more stringent codes in the 2014 State of the City Address.

Residential

Residential construction in Salt Lake City complies with the Utah Codes. Salt Lake City actively lobbies the state to increase the stringency of building energy codes. Most recently, the mayor advocated for more stringent codes in the 2014 State of the City Address.

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of Texas allows its local jurisdictions to adopt and amend building energy codes that are at least as stringent as the Texas Building Energy Code. The minimum state standard for single-family residential construction must comply with the 2015 International Residential Code (IRC). All other residential and commercial building construction must comply with the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). State-funded building construction must comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2013. To learn more about the building energy code requirements for the State of Texas, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

San Antonio has adopted the 2015 IECC for commercial buildings with local amendments, effective July 2015. 

Residential

San Antonio has adopted the 2015 IECC for residential buildings with local amendments, effective July 2015. 

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of California allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes more stringent than the mandatory state codes. Title 24 outlines all California building codes. Title 24, Part 6 includes the California Energy Code and the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards (BEES). Title 24, Part 11 includes the California Green Building Code. The California Building Code, BEES and California Green Building Codes have been updated in 2016 and are effective January 1, 2017. The 2016 codes exceed the 2015 IECC standards and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2013. To learn more about California’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Although local authority is permitted, no stretch code has been adopted. San Diego adheres to the 2016 California codes.

Residential

Although local authority is permitted, no stretch code has been adopted. San Diego adheres to the 2016 California codes.

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of California allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes that are more stringent than the mandatory state codes. Title 24 outlines all California building codes. Title 24, Part 6 includes the California Energy Code and the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards (BEES). Title 24, Part 11 includes the California Green Building Code. The California Energy Code, BEES and California Green Building Codes have been updated in 2016 and are effective January 1, 2017. The 2016 codes exceed the 2015 IECC and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2013. To learn more about California’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

San Francisco has developed the San Francisco Building Code (SFBC) Chapter 13C (Green Building Ordinance) which requires all new commercial buildings be 10% more efficient than the minimum state required codes. Additionally, SFBC 13C.5.103.1.5 requires new commercial buildings of 25,000 square feet or larger to achieve LEED Gold.

Residential

San Francisco has developed the San Francisco Building Code (SFBC) Chapter 13C (Green Building Ordinance) which requires all new residential buildings to be 10% more efficient than the minimum state required codes.

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of California allows its local jurisdictions to adopt building energy codes that are more stringent than the mandatory state codes. Title 24 outlines all California building codes. Title 24, Part 6 includes the California Energy Code and the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards (BEES). Title 24, Part 11 includes the California Green Building Code. The California Energy Code, BEES and California Green Building Codes have been updated in 2016 and are effective January 1, 2017. The 2016 codes exceed the 2015 IECC standards and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2013. To learn more about California’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Although local authority is permitted, no stretch code has been adopted. San Jose adheres to the 2016 California codes.

Residential

Although local authority is permitted, no stretch code has been adopted. San Jose adheres to the 2016 California codes.

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of Washington requires all local jurisdictions to comply with the state mandated residential building energy codes, but permits local jurisdictions to have more stringent commercial codes. The 2015 Washington State Energy Code is a state-developed code that is mandatory statewide. As of July 1, 2016, the 2015 versions of the residential and commercial codes include standards more stringent than the 2015 IECC and ASHRAE 90.1-2013. To learn more about the building energy codes required in the State of Washington, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Seattle has adopted the 2015 Seattle Energy Code, which is based on the Washington State Energy Code with amendments. The 2015 Seattle Energy Code is 20% more stringent than ASHRAE 90.1-2013. The code became effective January 1, 2017.

Residential

Seattle has adopted the Washington State Energy Code, effective January 1, 2017. The city is an active participant in energy code advocacy at the state level. 

Last Updated: March 2017

The State of Missouri is home-ruled, and allows local jurisdictions to set their own building codes. To learn more about Missouri’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

The Energy Conservation Code of the City of St. Louis is based on the 2009 IECC for commercial buildings.

Residential

The Energy Conservation Code of the City of St. Louis is based on the 2009 IECC for residential buildings.

Last Updated: March 2017

Effective June 30, 2015, Florida law requires that residential and commercial buildings comply with the 5th Edition (2014) Florida Building Code, Energy Conservation. The 5th Edition (2014) Florida Building Code, Energy Conservation based on the 2012 IECC with amendments. The 6th Edition (2017) is on schedule to take effect on December 31, 2017. Cities are not permitted to adopt codes more stringent than the state codes. To learn more about Florida’s building energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database

Commercial

Commercial construction in Tampa complies with the Florida codes. Tampa has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in commercial building energy codes.

Residential

Residential construction in Tampa complies with the Florida codes. Tampa has not yet begun advocating for increased stringency in residential building energy codes.

Last Updated: January 2017

The State of Virginia requires its local jurisdictions to follow the 2012 Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code (USBC) for residential and commerical construction. As of July 14, 2014, the USBC was updated to reference the 2012 IECC and 2012 IRC. Residential buildings must comply with the 2012 IRC, while commercial buildings must meet 2012 IECC standards with reference to ASHRAE 90.1-2010. To learn more, please see the Virginia page of the State Policy Database.  

Commercial

Commercial construction in Virginia Beach complies with the 2012 Virginia USBC. The city is a member of the Virginia Energy Efficiency Council (VAEEC) which advocates for higher energy standards.

Residential

Residential construction in Virginia Beach complies with the 2012 Virginia USBC. The city is a member of the Virginia Energy Efficiency Council (VAEEC) which advocates for higher energy standards.

Last Updated: January 2017

Washington D.C.’s energy codes are mandatory across the District. Residential and commercial construction must comply with the 2013 D.C. Construction Code. The D.C. Construction Code includes the Energy Conservation Code which is more stringent than the 2012 IECC and ASHRAE 90.1-2010. The Construction Code also includes the Green Construction Code which is based on the 2012 International Green Construction Code. To learn more about the District of Columbia’s required energy codes, please visit the State Policy Database.

Commercial

Washington D.C. complies with 2013 D.C. Construction Code. 

Residential

Washington D.C. complies with 2013 D.C. Construction Code

Last Updated: January 2017